Not liking one pedal driving

bhopkins

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I am not talking about physically decelerating I am talking about the brake lights being illuminated.

I have owned several EVs. My plug in Pacifica had a mode that felt like a slightly lower gear. Pulling off the accelerator never activated the brake lights but it also had a nice subtle deceleration. It was never jarring to pull off the gas.

Based on the responses here I guess maybe I'm just weird but I don't want anyone thinking I'm brake checking them or constantly pressing the brakes.
Some of this is driven by federal regulations that require the brake lights to be illuminated at certain rates of deceleration. It appears both Tesla and Rivian have these implemented…can’t comment on what newer ICE cars do under significant deceleration occurring without use of a brake pedal (letting off of the accelerator while going uphill).

 

rodhx

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I just don't understand why they don't blend regen into the friction brake pedal.
EVs do blend regen with the friction brakes. Going with stronger regen or “one pedal driving” allows you to do just what it says…use only one pedal…while trying to maximize energy capture.
 

luriaj

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I honestly don't understand. Either something is wrong or you haven't figured it out yet. It took a couple days to master it, but the only time I step on the brake is to put the car in reverse or drive. I find that OPD is infinitely smoother than using a brake pedal. Zero jerkiness. Day one it was kinda jumpy until you get it, but now...max regen and not a lurch to be felt. To each their own I guess.
 

mindstormsguy

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EVs do blend regen with the friction brakes. Going with stronger regen or “one pedal driving” allows you to do just what it says…use only one pedal…while trying to maximize energy capture.
Most EVs do. But I believe both Rivians and Teslas do not. If you reduce 1 pedal driving regen strength, that is lost forever, burned in the friction brakes.

I prefer what many other manufacturers (like Audi and BMW) do, where even if you choose to *not* use 1-pedal driving, your brake pedal will be regen first, and only blend friction brakes in when needed for additional stopping force.

My biggest complaint with Rivian is this. I really wish they would have done brake by wire, so they could give the option of proper regen using the brake pedal. I know some people prefer 1 pedal driving, but I do not. At least not *all* the time. I much rather have the option to easily toggle 1 pedal on and off. As a previous poster said, sometimes I just want to coast. Sometimes I just want to hover over the brake. It’s nice to have an option where neutral input from me means a neutral intent on the drivetrain. No accel or decel.
 

Dark-Fx

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Everyone has nailed it with their comments. You can’t simply pull your foot of the accelerator pedal and you must simply learn to adjust your pressure on the pedal to slow down.
Not true. You can learn to time it where you completely lift off to stop at just the right point.
 


SANZC02

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I will admit when I first got the Tesla it took a few minutes to adjust going between that and the Jeep GC but after a month it was second nature.

Once you adjust to using the accelerator as a throttle instead of a gas pedal it really enhances the driving experience, especially with spirited driving on a windy road.

When I did my test drive back in December, it seems like the low setting on Rivian was a little stronger than the high setting on the Model S, the high setting was quite a bit stronger but only took me a couple of minutes to adjust to the Rivian.

Looking forward to getting my R1S to take down a couple of my favorite windy roads.

Pretty sure once the R1S comes my life with ICE vehicles will be behind me, as well ever having to replace brake pads as the left peddle will see very little activity.
 

bd5400

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Some of this is driven by federal regulations that require the brake lights to be illuminated at certain rates of deceleration. It appears both Tesla and Rivian have these implemented…can’t comment on what newer ICE cars do under significant deceleration occurring without use of a brake pedal (letting off of the accelerator while going uphill).
While I can't comment on uphill, any ICE vehicle I've owned that has allowed for manual shifting an automatic will illuminate the brake lights if you downshift far enough that engine braking crosses a deceleration threshold.
 

bd5400

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There should be a setting that allows some light regen but not enough to activate the brake lights.
This is what our Model X does and I presume it is what the R1T does (someone who has taken delivery can perhaps correct me). You can decelerate with regen and not trigger the brake lights so long as the deceleration isn't heavy. Once it crosses a certain rate of deceleration, the brake lights will illuminate.
 

Dark-Fx

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I decided against getting a Taycan because Porsche thinks they know better and don't have one pedal driving. I'm glad Rivian has reasonable settings, but after driving EVs from two different manufacturers that would blend brakes in when the battery had limitations for Regen, I wish Rivian supported it.
 

Gshenderson

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Is this safer than using traditional brakes in the winter on snowy/icy road?
I would say yes, but others might argue otherwise. So long as you feather the pressure off of the accelerator vs. completely lifting your foot. The latter would have a similar effect as hitting the breaks.
 


ERguy

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Most EVs do. But I believe both Rivians and Teslas do not. If you reduce 1 pedal driving regen strength, that is lost forever, burned in the
Ford has a blended braking system too, and it works incredibly smoothly on the Mach e. I think Rivian missed the boat here if they aren't doing this.
 
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blturner

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I would say yes, but others might argue otherwise. So long as you feather the pressure off of the accelerator vs. completely lifting your foot. The latter would have a similar effect as hitting the breaks.
I would go guess it is not a clear yes or no. As long as the traction control is up to the task then it does not matter. But when you get into those corner conditions where traction control does not know what to do, then I doubt you can control the wheels either. There is no feedback as to if the wheels are spinning, rolling or sliding. You can't lightly press the gas or brake. Coasting on a sheet of ice gives the best lateral stability.
 
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blturner

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I did not know that the R1T can't do regen on the brake pedal. That would be wasteful to not do regen at all. But at least let us turn it way down while we get used to it. Every driver has to make it through a dangerous period while they learn. Not a good plan to force the issue.

Someone suggested that it was the speed of the throttle changes rather than the absolute position. Not sure how anyone would get used to that. I will do some testing and see if that is what my R1T is doing. I hope it is absolute position based.

BTW. My niece opted for a Volvo XC90 PHV over a model Y because she did not like the OPD when she test drove the Model Y. I told her that I thought it could be disabled. But it looks like I was wrong.
 

nukem384

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I haven't driven an R1T, but are you fully releasing the pedal each time you are trying to stop instead of gradually backing off? In our Teslas, you can modulate the amount of regenerative braking by how far you back off the pedal. It's pretty easy to get it to be fairly smooth and once you're used to it its second nature. You shouldn't be limited to full regeneration or none at all.

I will say, however, that it can be a little disorienting getting back into an ICE vehicle after you've been driving an EV for a while because of the lack of regeneration and single pedal driving.
Exactly what I was thinking too. To adjust to regen like you're braking in an ICE car, you need to gradually let off the accelerator, not fully at once. Even sometimes press the accel if you let off too much. With regen, esp. in these Rivian's which I've heard the regen is really strong, it'd be like slamming on the brakes essentially.

I always find it funny when I see other Tesla's around who don't know how to use regen correctly. You can tell because their brake lights will go a bit crazy (algorithm) because they are letting fully off the accel, and then pushing it again to adjust instead of just keep your foot on the accel and incrementally adjusting off and on.
 

No.92

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I am not liking OPD in my new Rivian. I wish I could turn it off. I know that it saves energy but for me it is dangerous and annoying.
I have about 1200 miles and 2 weeks in my Rivian. The OPD will really throw you forward in your seat if you let all the way up while doing 25 mph or so. I breaks so hard that I worry about the car behind me hitting me. If I let up while looking to the left to clear for a merge it makes my head bob and is very disorienting.
It makes my passengers have a much less smooth ride. I am the smoothest driver in my family and seldom make anyone motion sick on the curvy roads to our lake cabin. But not with OPD, I just about made myself sick last weekend.
When I get back in a normal vehicle I get surprised the first stop I come to before I switch my mind back to normal driving. There are so many new things to get used in a new vehicle this just makes it that much harder.

I figured I would get used to it but I don't seem to be making any progress.

I am thinking of calling my guide and putting in a feature request but though I would get some feedback here first.
Do you like paying a lot of money for brakes?
 

 
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