Trandall

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Can I just drive my R1T and plug it in when it’s down to 20-30%, letting it charge overnight?

If an EV ain’t that simple, adoption is still a LONG ways away.
Yes, thankfully nerding out on Batt. Management systems (BMS) and charge strategy as we enjoy doing isn't necessary for non technofiles. The info discussed in these threads is built into the software the chargers and map routing Tesla, a better route planner, and presumably Rivian uses.





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Gshenderson

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Can I just drive my R1T and plug it in when it’s down to 20-30%, letting it charge overnight?

If an EV ain’t that simple, adoption is still a LONG ways away.
I think people do need to understand charger output in order to have a good EV experience. Refill time is a factor that ICE owners don’t have to worry about. Plugging into a std wall outlet takes days to charge. Plugging into a dryer outlet or using a home charger takes over night. J-1772 is about the same or slower than dryer outlet / home charger. 50kW DCFC will take an hour or more. 150kW DCFC more like 30 mins. 200-300kW under 30 mins. Folks will just need to learn these different charging options so they know what to expect as it relates to how long they will need to charge and how to find chargers that meet their needs.
 

Mysta

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So etron is 496 wh/mi at 75 mph so I imagine the real hwy range(at 70/80) of Rivian to be 260 which isn't bad, unless there's a buffer then maybe 240 or so(assuming 10kwh buffer). Which isn't terrible considering maybe when hauling flat it won't be so detrimental to range since the Rivian is already factoring in a lot of that aerodynamic loss. Excited to see someone get their hands on one.
 
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DuckTruck

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To come back to the RAN locations around the U.S. and Canada, I'm impressed by the coverage we'll have, even if it may take a couple of years to complete this first round. I'm especially pleased to know that Californians will never have to experience Range Anxiety. After carefully examining and overlaying location maps from several corporate websites using an old cartography app, it appears that Rivian was able to succefully partner with Starbucks, Home Depot, and 7-11, in addition to Whole Foods. There may be many more RAN locations than all of those stores combined, but my app upgrade is still downloading. Regardless, congratulations are in order!

Because of the small scale of Rivian's map and their large markers, even with my map app I was unable to get beyond the fourth layer of all of those spots in SoCal. With the number of stations already identified, in a drive from Tijuana to the Oregon border, you might have to endure the pressure of watching your SOC percentage plummet into the low 80s on some of those "remote" stretches. I'm guessing if you also keep your speed down to the low 80s, you'll make it to Ashland with some juice to spare

My app is quite powerful, but it failed to detect the RAN outposts that clearly must exist to cross and play in the panhandle of Texas, namely around Amarillo and Lubbock. Also, the Ozarks/Bull Shoals region of North Central Arkansas could use some love. Eureka Springs comes to mind.

I've said it elsewhere, but hey, I'm not shy. Burns Oregon would open up Steens Mountain (yes, thats the correct spelling and punctuation), the Kiger Gorge, Alvord Desert, and the rest of Central and Southeast Oregon, and McCall, Idaho would open up the Eastern side of Hells Canyon.

Again, nice job in getting the RAN rolling. Can't wait to see what's next!
 

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I really hope they support plug-and-charge on EA, like Ford. This kind of implies they won't.

I have just heard that the at home Rivian Wall Charger will come in both Plug-In and Hard Wire options. At this point we just don't know about pricing or all abilities.
 

PoorPilot

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I think people do need to understand charger output in order to have a good EV experience. Refill time is a factor that ICE owners don’t have to worry about. Plugging into a std wall outlet takes days to charge. Plugging into a dryer outlet or using a home charger takes over night. J-1772 is about the same or slower than dryer outlet / home charger. 50kW DCFC will take an hour or more. 150kW DCFC more like 30 mins. 200-300kW under 30 mins. Folks will just need to learn these different charging options so they know what to expect as it relates to how long they will need to charge and how to find chargers that meet their needs.
My experience with new or non-EV owners is the “unrealistic” thought that the vehicles have to be charged to 100% every night and the time involved in completing this. I’ve had to explain to multiple people that “charging“ is based on needs. It’s not a phone or tablet which typically requires 100% charge on a daily basis. I keep our X between 70-80% which is more than enough for our daily, even multi-day use.
I agree with you that people need to have a very basic understanding of the different charging levels and the times involved, but a more in-depth explanation regarding how it works could solve a lot of range anxiety - whether it be on a road trip or daily driving.
 

Mjhirsch78

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My experience with new or non-EV owners is the “unrealistic” thought that the vehicles have to be charged to 100% every night and the time involved in completing this. I’ve had to explain to multiple people that “charging“ is based on needs. It’s not a phone or tablet which typically requires 100% charge on a daily basis. I keep our X between 70-80% which is more than enough for our daily, even multi-day use.
I agree with you that people need to have a very basic understanding of the different charging levels and the times involved, but a more in-depth explanation regarding how it works could solve a lot of range anxiety - whether it be on a road trip or daily driving.
All of this. Having watched a ton of videos on EVs and charging, it still shocked me how many folks on these youtube channels still overplayed charging speed needs. For the first two weeks of owning our first EV we charged from a 110 and were fine. We have now owned the car a month and have a charger installed at home. We will have hit, after tomorrow’s adventure, roughly 1600 miles in 4 weeks. We could have done the vast majority of our charging off a 110, though the faster home charger is nice. We did have to use Superchargers to get up a mountain last week and will again to get to the rainforest and back tomorrow. That is where the RAN will be sweet. However, every other mile could have been slow charged (even double the power needed for a Rivian would have done the job during the week) and we could have left the car at no more than 80% charge.

As EVs become more ubiquitous, a lot of this will calm. We get to be the guides as our friends and family transition. Adventures come in many forms. 🙂
 

DucRider

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All of this. Having watched a ton of videos on EVs and charging, it still shocked me how many folks on these youtube channels still overplayed charging speed needs. For the first two weeks of owning our first EV we charged from a 110 and were fine. We have now owned the car a month and have a charger installed at home. We will have hit, after tomorrow’s adventure, roughly 1600 miles in 4 weeks. We could have done the vast majority of our charging off a 110, though the faster home charger is nice. We did have to use Superchargers to get up a mountain last week and will again to get to the rainforest and back tomorrow. That is where the RAN will be sweet. However, every other mile could have been slow charged (even double the power needed for a Rivian would have done the job during the week) and we could have left the car at no more than 80% charge.

As EVs become more ubiquitous, a lot of this will calm. We get to be the guides as our friends and family transition. Adventures come in many forms. 🙂
One advantage to installing L2 at home is preconditioning. Many EVs will not do that from 120.

Also, those that have TOU often have a shorter window to charge and L1 may not get them the charge they need.

Also need to watch your outlet closely - aging outlets are potential fire hazards, and if the charge cord puts weight on the connection it can magnify a loose connection.

I currently have two EVSEs installed in my garage. The 32A Leviton was included in the lease of our Fit EV, and the 48A ChargePoint was essentially free after a $500 utility rebate and the 30% tax credit.

I can't honestly say if it would be worth it to me to pay $1K to purchase/install a 240V EVSE. installed
 

Gshenderson

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All of this. Having watched a ton of videos on EVs and charging, it still shocked me how many folks on these youtube channels still overplayed charging speed needs. For the first two weeks of owning our first EV we charged from a 110 and were fine. We have now owned the car a month and have a charger installed at home. We will have hit, after tomorrow’s adventure, roughly 1600 miles in 4 weeks. We could have done the vast majority of our charging off a 110, though the faster home charger is nice. We did have to use Superchargers to get up a mountain last week and will again to get to the rainforest and back tomorrow. That is where the RAN will be sweet. However, every other mile could have been slow charged (even double the power needed for a Rivian would have done the job during the week) and we could have left the car at no more than 80% charge.

As EVs become more ubiquitous, a lot of this will calm. We get to be the guides as our friends and family transition. Adventures come in many forms. 🙂
Having done at least a half dozen 4,000-5,000 mile cross country round trips in my Tesla, I’ll say that charging speed is important for folks that are doing trips at or above 300 miles on a somewhat regular basis. If you just doing daily commutes or shorter trips, then no big deal. I’m still leaning towards LE with smaller pack even though it’ll be a huge inconvenience for me to get to my WY cabin and back since that can’t happen on a single charge. But the LE freebie on the wheels and $10k less for smaller pack, not to mention earlier delivery, outweigh the near term inconvenience. I’m still hopeful, that somebody will put a DCFC in Evanston, WY sooner rather than later although it’s not currently on either Rivian or EA plans.
 

azbill

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Hopefully Rivian is getting things rolling in Moab, there are already long lines at the ChargePoint DFDC there.

EVs-Moab.jpg
 

SANZC02

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Hopefully Rivian is getting things rolling in Moab, there are already long lines at the ChargePoint DFDC there.

EVs-Moab.jpg
I am impressed that they are out testing in public without worrying about the trim details that would not really impact how the vehicles work in the wild.

Kind of makes me think they are settings the priorities for the project to ensure success.
 

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