Debaser949

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so the Rivian charger will probably be a 48amp ?





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Mysta

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I have to ask. You seem to be pretty enamored with the Taycan. Why aren't you buying one of those?
I just think it's a good standard for a non Tesla. Also not sure you know how much charge you may use 'adventuring' in an EV, but you will possibly want to charge to 100% in those cases. Obviously a lot of this relies on information we simply don't know yet. It's okay for me to be interested and critical. After all, nothing we're saying here likely matters in the end, it's just a statement of my standards moving forward.
 

mkennedy1996

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I just think it's a good standard for a non Tesla. Also not sure you know how much charge you may use 'adventuring' in an EV, but you will possibly want to charge to 100% in those cases. Obviously a lot of this relies on information we simply don't know yet. It's okay for me to be interested and critical. After all, nothing we're saying here likely matters in the end, it's just a statement of my standards moving forward.
I was not judging. I was just curious based upon your Taycan comments. The Taycan is a solid car. If I was in the market for a sedan, it would probably be at the top of my list.

We are pretty active in our Teslas. I wish you could have seen our X last weekend climbing a trail in the North Georgia mountains. It took me 4 hours to get the mud off of it.
 

SANZC02

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so the Rivian charger will probably be a 48amp ?
I asked CS today. The Rivian wall charger needs a 60 amp circuit and will charge at 48 amps delivering 11.5 kw per hour.

Interesting that when they say 26 miles an hour charge Rate that is 442 watts per mile They are using for their calculation. That puts a 135kw battery pack at 305 miles. That is right in between what I heard the R1T was 300 and R1S was 310 in the projections.

That same charger would do a Tesla Model S at about 39 miles an hour.
 

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Interesting that when they say 26 miles an hour charge Rate that is 442 watts per mile They are using for their calculation. That puts a 135kw battery pack at 305 miles. That is right in between what I heard the R1T was 300 and R1S was 310 in the projections.
You are forgetting to factor in charging losses. Only ~90% of the 11.5 kW makes it into the battery. Closer to 400 watts/mile by that method. And they have stated the large pack will be "a little smaller than 135 kW". No indication if that is nominal or useable energy.
 

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That is true, the difference is it was tied to the original owner and not the car. Pre 2017 it is tied to the car so when you sell the 2012-2016 cars, new owner gets that benefit as well.

They also had some incentive programs where they were doing 400KW a year free and charging after to facilitate at least a portion of a road trip.
Thanks for clarifying.
 

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This will be my first electric vehicle so pardon my ignorance/confusion but question for you guys... I was looking at the Chargepoint Flex vs the Rivian charger and charge point offers it as low as 16 AMP all the way up to 50 amps. What is the Rivian supposed to be and can a common electrical panel even support something as high as 50?
You likely already have 50amp breakers in your breaker box for a dryer, AC and potentially an electric range. The question is do you have room and enough rated service power coming into the box to add another 50 amp or 60 amp breaker and associated load. You’d likely want to have an electrician check that for you.
 

SANZC02

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You are forgetting to factor in charging losses. Only ~90% of the 11.5 kW makes it into the battery. Closer to 400 watts/mile by that method. And they have stated the large pack will be "a little smaller than 135 kW". No indication if that is nominal or useable energy.
I am very interested to see what I get in the R1S, I average 324 w/mi in a Model S so would be stoked if I can get 400 w/mi in the R1S. Maybe if I buy some lighter shoes....

Sadly the realist in me thinks 450 w/mi will be closer to my reality.
 

mkennedy1996

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I asked CS today. The Rivian wall charger needs a 60 amp circuit and will charge at 48 amps delivering 11.5 kw per hour.

Interesting that when they say 26 miles an hour charge Rate that is 442 watts per mile They are using for their calculation. That puts a 135kw battery pack at 305 miles. That is right in between what I heard the R1T was 300 and R1S was 310 in the projections.

That same charger would do a Tesla Model S at about 39 miles an hour.
They publish charging speeds for two different chargers. They do not specify which vehicle these are for, nor do they give specifics on the wheel configuration, which can have an impact on range.

The mobile charger provides 7.68kW of power and adds 16 miles per hour of range.
You have to deduct a percentage of that power that is lost during the charging process in order to come to the power available to add range. In this case I use a charging loss of 8% and 10%.

At a 10% charging inefficiency loss, you have 6,912 watts available to add range. Their spec indicates this would add 16 miles of range (with rounding this could be 15.51 to 16.49):
432Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (419 to 446Wh/mile)

At an 8% charging inefficiency loss, you have 7,066 watts available to add range. Their spec indicates this would add 16 miles of range (with rounding this could be 15.51 to 16.49):
442Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (428 to 456Wh/mile)

The hard wired charger provides 11.5kW of power and adds 25 miles per hour of range.

At a 10% charging inefficiency loss, you have 10,350 watts available to add range. Their spec indicates this would add 25 miles of range (with rounding this could be 24.51 to 25.49):
414Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (406 to 422Wh/mile)

At an 8% charging inefficiency loss, you have 10,580 watts available to add range. Their spec indicates this would add 25 miles of range (with rounding this could be 24.51 to 25.49):
423Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (415 to 432Wh/mile)

This at those scenarios:
432Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (419 to 446Wh/mile)
442Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (428 to 456Wh/mile)
414Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (406 to 422Wh/mile)
423Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (415 to 432Wh/mile)
The average of these comes to 428Wh/mile or between (417 to 439Wh/mile)

Based upon available data, that is my best guess.
 

DuckTruck

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They publish charging speeds for two different chargers. They do not specify which vehicle these are for, nor do they give specifics on the wheel configuration, which can have an impact on range.

The mobile charger provides 7.68kW of power and adds 16 miles per hour of range.
You have to deduct a percentage of that power that is lost during the charging process in order to come to the power available to add range. In this case I use a charging loss of 8% and 10%.

At a 10% charging inefficiency loss, you have 6,912 watts available to add range. Their spec indicates this would add 16 miles of range (with rounding this could be 15.51 to 16.49):
432Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (419 to 446Wh/mile)

At an 8% charging inefficiency loss, you have 7,066 watts available to add range. Their spec indicates this would add 16 miles of range (with rounding this could be 15.51 to 16.49):
442Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (428 to 456Wh/mile)

The hard wired charger provides 11.5kW of power and adds 25 miles per hour of range.

At a 10% charging inefficiency loss, you have 10,350 watts available to add range. Their spec indicates this would add 25 miles of range (with rounding this could be 24.51 to 25.49):
414Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (406 to 422Wh/mile)

At an 8% charging inefficiency loss, you have 10,580 watts available to add range. Their spec indicates this would add 25 miles of range (with rounding this could be 24.51 to 25.49):
423Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (415 to 432Wh/mile)

This at those scenarios:
432Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (419 to 446Wh/mile)
442Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (428 to 456Wh/mile)
414Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (406 to 422Wh/mile)
423Wh/mile - with rounding this could be between (415 to 432Wh/mile)
The average of these comes to 428Wh/mile or between (417 to 439Wh/mile)

Based upon available data, that is my best guess.
Man, Moving forward, I hope to learn even a fraction of what you guys know about these charging rates, capabilities and the do's and dont's around this subject! The last math lesson I remember was that "Five out of four people suck at fractions." Well, I guess I know which 30% I'm in. 🤔
 
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Ladiver

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Can I just drive my R1T and plug it in when it’s down to 20-30%, letting it charge overnight?

If an EV ain’t that simple, adoption is still a LONG ways away.
 

CommodoreAmiga

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Can I just drive my R1T and plug it in when it’s down to 20-30%, letting it charge overnight?

If an EV ain’t that simple, adoption is still a LONG ways away.
Yes, you can do that. You don't want to charge up to 100% regularly, but you should be able to configure either your EVSE or your R1 to "stop" at a safe limit (could be 80%-95%, depending on what Rivian says).
 

Mjhirsch78

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Can I just drive my R1T and plug it in when it’s down to 20-30%, letting it charge overnight?

If an EV ain’t that simple, adoption is still a LONG ways away.
Yup.

Unexpectedly (okay semi-expectedly) had to replace one of our old gals this week and got a Tesla. This is my first EV. I plug my Model Y into the standard wall socket with the cord/charger that came with the car every night. We are good to go every morning. When we drove it home the first night, we arrived at less than 50% charge. So that night, we popped the adaptor in and plugged it into the dryer socket. Bam done. No need to be an electrician. These fine folks on the forum have taught me the math, but don’t need it to use the car (With the exception of lowering amperage if you use an adaptor for plugging into RV/camper plugs).

Hope that helps.
 

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