Anyone worried?

Frank Rast

New Member
First Name
Frank
Joined
May 6, 2020
Messages
1
Reaction score
1
Location
Anchorage
First Name
Frank
Vehicles
2012 Mini Countryman, 2004 F-150
Occupation
Retired professional engineer
So I am in no means a wealthy person, not saying I am poor or even close to that, but paying for my 2018 f 150 was a decent chunk for me. My biggest worry here is I am planning to sell my very established ( and awesome 3.5 eco boost ) to get a BEV which considering is a new technology and one that is constantly going to evolve at a rapid pace. Also shelling out more money for a BEV truck company that is also brand new and no offense to anyone here but unproven. Not saying anything bad about any of the new companies coming out but until they have their products out of the streets and work out the kinks, there will be kinks, there is no knowing how reliable they are. Does anyone know how the process was owning the first released Tesla’s? I believe that will have a close representation of what it could be to own a Rivian or any other newer BEV company. How do you get around issues and maintenance? And the biggest worry I have is how do you jump into the unknown of something new when there’s a good chance there will be initial issues with these vehicles ? And like I said above with the battery technology always changing and improving, how do we buy an early BEV vehicle when there’s bound to be a much better battery right around the corner?
My F-150 is 16 years old and I am buying an R1T for one last truck. My advice is to enjoy your new truck for a few years and then consider a BEV.
 
Last edited:
OP
Jehorton

Jehorton

Well-Known Member
First Name
James
Joined
Jun 27, 2020
Messages
108
Reaction score
44
Location
Stuart Florida
First Name
James
Vehicles
2018 Ford F-150
Occupation
Firefighter
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #122
My F-150 is 16 years old and I am buying an R1T for one last truck. My advice is to enjoy your new truck for a few years and then consider a BEV.
Considering I wouldn’t even be able to buy one until 2023 with the projections on releases and I have yet to buy a spot in line. Hopefully by then some kinks will be ironed out
 

Coast2Coast

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Feb 17, 2020
Messages
253
Reaction score
201
Location
Santa Cruz, Ca./Odawara, Jpn
First Name
Mark
Vehicles
1981 Volvo wagon; 2006 Tacoma SR5; 2009 Toyota Prius
It's frustrating to wait so long - and it keeps getting longer and longer - but I'm relieved that Rivian isn't rushing to market and using us as beta test rats. That would seriously irk me if I'd plunked down $70-75 grand and had new problems to iron out every week, if I could even get someone out to my place in the woods to take a look.

I've only had Toyotas for 40 years (the Volvo in my profile was a family car) and driven them well over a half-million miles without a major mechanical failure. Not one. I don't expect that level of reliability with Rivians, but wouldn't it great if RJ and crew surprise us with great quality and reliability and, when service is needed, Cox & Privet know what they're doing and get it done right!

In other words, I don't mind waiting if the product is worth waiting for. Go Rivian!
 

ajdelange

Well-Known Member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
545
Reaction score
221
Location
Virginia/Quebec
First Name
A. J.
Vehicles
Tesla X Extended Range Plus 2019, Lexus, Landcruiser, SR5
Occupation
EE Retired
Anyone with experience with high tech equipment knows that you don't want a low serial number. There is an art to building this kind of gear and that art isn't acquired over night or by reading a book. Therefore, if dealing with the kinks and bumps of a new product line is going to bother you more than having a really nifty piece of technology at your disposal delights you it would probably be best for you to defer ordering.

I, and I expect everyone else here, fully expects that Rivian will do everything within its power to produce a solid vehicle and will take care of all the problems that arise but it is only reasonable to expect some bumpd until they get the hang of production level manufacturing.
 

gombater

New Member
First Name
Rick
Joined
Nov 23, 2019
Messages
2
Reaction score
1
Location
Illinois
First Name
Rick
Vehicles
F150
First of all let's be clear. When people on this forum say "the investors will not let them build a bad product" they are out of touch with reality. There are many companies where the investors lost everything as the company had unforeseen problems and went bankrupt. Fiskar Automotive in 2013 for example. Tesla may not be a good comparison to Rivian. Tesla had stores, superchargers and service centers set up when they launched. And as a first Tesla Model X owner I can tell you there were several issues, the worst was inability to get parts in a timely manner. This caused me to sell my X. Now as a Y owner I know that problem has been resolved for the most part. I canceled my R1T order because I did not want to go through this again. I still may buy one but not until a one year customer feedback file has been established. I would recommend you get the new 2021 F150 which is a game changer and then get a Rivian in 2024 if they are meeting everyone's expectations.
I have recently been seriously considering this option. I am just not sure the RiT meets my needs relative to towing/size of bed. Getting the 2021 F150 could be a good option while Rivian/CT/Electric F150/Hummer EV play out....
 

Dark-Fx

New Member
First Name
Brian
Joined
Jul 15, 2020
Messages
3
Reaction score
10
Location
Michigan
First Name
Brian
Vehicles
Bolt EV, Volt
Occupation
Engineering
5. Rivian has empty warehouses, you don't think Tesls knows how to spin up a factory? Look what they did in China
I did work on a paint shop for SGMW in China. The road to the plant was dirt, the inside of the plant was dirt, there were no working bathrooms for the first two months of our project there. The area that held our equipment was a little bit more finished but we had to be careful about tracking stuff in every day. That would never fly in the US for various reasons.
 

diegova11

New Member
First Name
D
Joined
Jul 29, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
2
Location
Virginia
First Name
D
Vehicles
Model S
i have a 2013 model s...still runs great, no major issues like other horror stories i'm hearing. I'm genuinely glad i bought mine earlier, even if it's missing A LOT of the bells and whistles...Tesla could not maintain their quality or customer service with the drastic take up. They also had almost ZERO ability to repair early on (took me 6 weeks to get front bumper replaced). I'm looking forward to Ford's involvement to help with the parts/repair aspect-which will be needed along with the pre-orders from Amazon.

I'm also hoping that with all the testing, road trips, etc. they'll have worked out most of the kinks.

So little information...most of what's out there is from those of interested sharing what they hear/learn about auto show events...not because Rivian is doing a great job communicating. But yes, i'm concerned and still toying with idea of pulling my deposit...but then everyone behind me moves up a spot!
 

ja_kub_sz

Member
First Name
Jacob
Joined
Aug 4, 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
11
Location
Central Illinois
First Name
Jacob
Vehicles
Land Rover Discovery
Occupation
Anesthesia
When I first got my Model S (2015) I ordered it without ever even driving it, setting foot in a showroom, or having any real understanding or comprehension of what owning an EV would entail. I simply was so excited about all that I had read and heard about Tesla that I was convinced I had to have one. My fully loaded F-150 was a great vehicle, but no better than any other truck on the market. My Lincoln MKZ Hybrid opened my eyes to what advantages and pleasantries a more fuel-efficient car could offer me. But at no point in time did I have that feeling of complete desire and elation when thinking about the prospects of getting behind the wheel of one as I did my Tesla.

Rivian is quite the same for me. Automobiles are an emotional purchase, which I believe is a great thing. The utility which these vehicles provide is unquestionably essential to our current way of life and is kind of ubiquitous. After all, point A to point B and the box is pretty much checked across the board when it comes to a car. The balance between these two ideas, emotion, and practicality is tenuous to say the least at times. A fully loaded F-150 back when I had mine was around 68k, my MKZ 52k, and wealth aside these cars not only for myself but I am guessing 99% of us is a significant expense. Yet we do it willingly and look back at these cars as if they were our most trusted companions or worse yet archenemies. Cars really do mean a lot when you look at them both ways, rationally and emotionally.

These risks, these emotional vehicles, these vital objects are all a big deal. I cannot say it enough, everything you think about when you contemplate your next truck or SUV purchase RJ and the people at Rivian are doing the exact same, and then some. It’s like if you put yourself in their position, you'd have all those same questions to answer, and concerns to address, and you know they would be crucial things on potential owners’ minds. RJ and Rivian are car people just like us, end users and consumers, and they are thinking about the risks versus rewards of ownership, the true cost driving a Rivian and the overall experience their vehicle will provide. They know they have some strong selling points and some absolute product barrier's ahead of them. And just like Tesla and Ford, there are the good and the bad moments of owning any vehicle and those moments differ depending on auto manufacturer and are more unforgivable to some then others, but those moments define the ownership experience.

With my Fords I felt the customer service was okay, the minor faults with the vehicles no more or less annoying then anything I experienced before, and my ownership experience was enjoyable. But as for my Tesla... It was a revelation. The purchases experience was easy, the car brilliant, the drive otherworldly, and every time I jumped in the driver seat I was truly and honestly surprised at just how emotional cars can be. It was something special and of value to me. I feel that's exactly why Tesla has done so well for itself and Elon knows that dynamic not only exist but should exist more so as the capabilities of vehicles become more and more indistinguishable over time.

My ownership experience with my Tesla was actually great, no problems or hiccups to report back on other than going through tires a little quicker than I'd like, but again I did drive it around a lot. However, there were some big learning moments and things that when compared to my previous cars I never would have ever anticipated or expected, none of which good. So, I say "actually great*" with an asterix when recalling my ownership experience for my Tesla. Range is a serious issue with electric cars. Spending 100k, 70k or even 30k for an EV that at some point in time you can't even drive because you don't have enough range or are worried about charging it is just infuriating. This happened a lot to me, and even forced me into some really bad positions when a charger was down. Secondly, I did get into an accident and saw the true inadequacies of a fledgling auto company regarding repairing and servicing its vehicles, which was miserable. I got in one accident with what to me was a drivable car and next thing you know I am leasing a new vehicle and never got my Model S back after it was gone for over 8 months... Yes 8 months, and it was drivable! Tesla did reimburse me 6 months of payments, but it honestly was the worst way to end my ownership experience with Tesla.

This left me in a strange place, I knew I loved the car, but I was now having to ask myself was it worth it?

Is a Rivian worth it? Is it the exception, or the rule that matters most to you?

70k is a ton of money, something not to be taken lightly and making the jump from a legacy auto manufacturer to an EV startup is a big leap of faith. But I am bias and know the way my mind works and think a great number of us can agree. The exceptional moments in our lives are the ones we look back at with great fondness and longing. The "rule" is we typically forget the mundane moments as the fade off into obscurity.

I am all in on my Rivian R1T. I could not think of a better 40th B-day gift to myself come June next year. I am a super introspective and analytical person and was Rivian event hopping last year and speaking with RJ and Brian Gase in person whenever they had a free moment to talk all things cars and better yet all things Rivian. And after a couple of talks, a shared Uber ride and a meal, I can honestly say the experience of just having a preorder for a Rivian has been the best car experience of my life!

Good luck with your decision @Jehorton, there is no right or wrong with this one I feel. Happy you made the first step with your preorder and are enjoying the community thus far.

Take care
 

ajdelange

Well-Known Member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
545
Reaction score
221
Location
Virginia/Quebec
First Name
A. J.
Vehicles
Tesla X Extended Range Plus 2019, Lexus, Landcruiser, SR5
Occupation
EE Retired
... for an EV that at some point in time you can't even drive because you don't have enough range or are worried about charging it is just infuriating. This happened a lot to me, and even forced me into some really bad positions when a charger was down.
As the purpose of this thread is to give prospective Rivian owners a realistic picture as to whether there is any aspects of ownership they should be worried about I would like to ask you whether you feel that you would be likely to experience this kind of problem today or whether you think it was because the charging network was not sufficiently evolved at the time you were operating this car.

However you answer (assuming you will) I'll point out that my experience with Tesla is exactly the opposite of what you experienced. Charging has never been a problem for me and is, in fact, no more bothersome to me than driving a petrol fueled car is. BUT my initial introduction to BEVs/Tesla came appreciably later than yours: January 2019. I guess the real question is "Do you feel the system has improved to the point where you would be comfortable with a BEV/Tesla?"
 

Coast2Coast

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mark
Joined
Feb 17, 2020
Messages
253
Reaction score
201
Location
Santa Cruz, Ca./Odawara, Jpn
First Name
Mark
Vehicles
1981 Volvo wagon; 2006 Tacoma SR5; 2009 Toyota Prius
There's a related issue to range anxiety, vehicle reliability, service availability and the like which I don't believe has been addressed. It is - do you go all-in, without a backup vehicle, or do you have a backup vehicle even though you'd prefer not to?

I live alone; there's no other vehicle around as a matter of course. I have 3 vehicles, and 2 hardly ever get used. I'd prefer to trade in all of them and put all of my eggs in a Rivian basket. I want a Cox Auto car carrier to pull up, off-load my Rivian (unless I do a factory pickup), and take away my three old-timer vehicles.

But is that wise? I live 35 miles from San Jose where Rivian has a major facility. I'm well within white glove territory, but even so, am I willing to put up with an endless stream of minor and occasional major repairs from an auto startup? Think of the tens of thousands things that can go wrong. Most of the OEMs have figured out how to build cars with fairly high levels of reliability and, if something goes wrong, multiple dealerships are within a few miles. Not so with Rivian.

So, my question for forum members is: go all-in and, by that, I mean no backup vehicle or, be sensible, of course you keep a backup vehicle?
 

jjwolf120

Well-Known Member
First Name
John
Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
74
Reaction score
43
Location
Arcadia
First Name
John
Vehicles
Toyota Highlander Hybrid
Occupation
TPA
So, my question for forum members is: go all-in and, by that, I mean no backup vehicle or, be sensible, of course you keep a backup vehicle?
Because you live in a developed area, the likely result of repairs being needed to your Rivian would result in you getting a loaner car while your Rivian was being repaired. In a really terrible situation you would need to rent a car or use a ride service, which is also not that difficult. I would say that unless you have a specific use case for one of your other vehicles, that you should get rid of them. If, however, keeping one of them gives you peace of mind, then by all means keep one.
 
OP
Jehorton

Jehorton

Well-Known Member
First Name
James
Joined
Jun 27, 2020
Messages
108
Reaction score
44
Location
Stuart Florida
First Name
James
Vehicles
2018 Ford F-150
Occupation
Firefighter
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #132
Because you live in a developed area, the likely result of repairs being needed to your Rivian would result in you getting a loaner car while your Rivian was being repaired. In a really terrible situation you would need to rent a car or use a ride service, which is also not that difficult. I would say that unless you have a specific use case for one of your other vehicles, that you should get rid of them. If, however, keeping one of them gives you peace of mind, then by all means keep one.
I have the luxury of having a back up and if you could why not? I’d keep the most reliable ICE you have if you can afford to. You never know when you’ll need it.
 

thrill

Well-Known Member
First Name
billy
Joined
Jan 14, 2020
Messages
51
Reaction score
29
Location
South Carolina
First Name
billy
Vehicles
i3s, z4m, hp4, (r1t)
I no longer have my Z4M (except on paper) as my young daughter "borrowed the convertible" months ago :) Half-assed retired, I work from home, my wife drives the i3s, and I just take a Lyft whenever I go anywhere (or make arrangements with my wife). Not having a vehicle here is no problem at all, but that's circumstantial and wouldn't work if I was really remote. The R1T is mostly a "because I want it" deal. If it breaks for long periods it'll be an inconvenience but not worth keeping another car around, IMO. I really don't expect significant issues, but will find them if so because I plan to work from the truck overlooking the local mountains and parks and lakes, etc. maybe with a fishing pole if I need to do some deep thinking.
 

azbill

Well-Known Member
First Name
Bill
Joined
Jun 8, 2020
Messages
57
Reaction score
28
Location
Arizona
First Name
Bill
Vehicles
GMC Sierra, Bolt, Sky
Occupation
Engineer
There's a related issue to range anxiety, vehicle reliability, service availability and the like which I don't believe has been addressed. It is - do you go all-in, without a backup vehicle, or do you have a backup vehicle even though you'd prefer not to?

I live alone; there's no other vehicle around as a matter of course. I have 3 vehicles, and 2 hardly ever get used. I'd prefer to trade in all of them and put all of my eggs in a Rivian basket. I want a Cox Auto car carrier to pull up, off-load my Rivian (unless I do a factory pickup), and take away my three old-timer vehicles.

But is that wise? I live 35 miles from San Jose where Rivian has a major facility. I'm well within white glove territory, but even so, am I willing to put up with an endless stream of minor and occasional major repairs from an auto startup? Think of the tens of thousands things that can go wrong. Most of the OEMs have figured out how to build cars with fairly high levels of reliability and, if something goes wrong, multiple dealerships are within a few miles. Not so with Rivian.

So, my question for forum members is: go all-in and, by that, I mean no backup vehicle or, be sensible, of course you keep a backup vehicle?
I currently have 3 vehicles, one is a Bolt, a GMC pickup (2008) and a Saturn Sky that hardly ever gets out of the garage. The GMC and Sky are both paid off, so I am thinking I will just keep the GMC as a backup for towing, since the cost is very low. Thus I will end up with 4 vehicles, which is what I actually had a couple of years ago. I tend to drive all of my vehicles until they are unusable, and I never do a lease,
 

ja_kub_sz

Member
First Name
Jacob
Joined
Aug 4, 2020
Messages
11
Reaction score
11
Location
Central Illinois
First Name
Jacob
Vehicles
Land Rover Discovery
Occupation
Anesthesia
And yes I live in a more rural area and travel to other rural areas. So my previous 270 mile rated 90D really pushed the limits. Now driving even more I could not have done it. But I know from experience a 400+ mile range would have solved that problem and with the ever growing charging infrastructure I believe even people like me (30-40k miles per year drivers) would be just fine only owning an EV.

I am in a two car household and it will be a three car once the R1T comes.
 
Top