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All electric household?

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As a fellow Nashvillian, I would make sure you have enough power service to your area(NES said our transformer can handle it, but told me to make sure to let them know before adding another EV to the block). And in my area, the service is pretty old, lots of mature trees, aka lots of occasional outages. So you might want to look into a battery backup or some sort of backup power plan to charge.

Otherwise, go for it! And I'll wave when I pass you.
Excellent thoughts. We plan on getting a battery backup in a year or two (my neighborhood is kinda new so not much older trees yet but I am a bit concerned due to the power outtage debacle about a month ago).
I'll definitely be waving at you when I get mine (if you see anyone waving frantically at you from a honda accord between now and June, that'll probably be me :D.
By the way, did we ever come up with a rivian 👋? If not, I suggest tank-turns ( if/when enabled :CWL:)
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Gas stations are closed during power outages
Gas stations near your house may be out if you don't have power, but if you drive a little further to a station fed from a different distribution circuit/feeder, you are more likely to find a gas station with power. And you can call ahead and ask them if they have power. Isolated instance, but when Hurricane Sandy hit NJ, areas were without power for days, or almost a week. I had family in NJ that would drive west, into Pennsylvania, to get gas for their portable generators. Sure, if they had a BEV back then, they could use that as a power source, until it ran out. And someone could also argue against gasoline based on the Colonial Pipeline hack for the southeast in May 2021.

For the time being, I like having an ICE and the EV. It provides energy diversity for transportation, so I don't have to rely on only one source. I still enjoy driving my 2 door soft top Wrangler. It isn't great for road trips, but I still like it, and it can do road trips if the EV infrastructure isn't great in an area. Plus the top comes down. If a BEV Wrangler/Bronco competitor was made, I would consider replacing it with that, but I think range would be a problem on a short wheelbase.
 

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I'd keep the Honda and see how it goes over a year or so.......We're two EV's (both long range) and a Hybrid Lexus. YMMV
 

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After getting the R1 my wife is on board with becoming a full electric family, and the Y makes so much sense because we love to road trip, but she refuses to get a Tesla :swear:
I have a Y and R1T. I believe your wife is making a decision on based on the personality of Elon Musk, not the vehicle itself. The Y is a terrific EV with the best technology and charging network. If I had to give up one or the other, it would be the R1T.
 

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Gas stations near your house may be out if you don't have power, but if you drive a little further to a station fed from a different distribution circuit/feeder, you are more likely to find a gas station with power. And you can call ahead and ask them if they have power. Isolated instance, but when Hurricane Sandy hit NJ, areas were without power for days, or almost a week. I had family in NJ that would drive west, into Pennsylvania, to get gas for their portable generators. Sure, if they had a BEV back then, they could use that as a power source, until it ran out. And someone could also argue against gasoline based on the Colonial Pipeline hack for the southeast in May 2021.

For the time being, I like having an ICE and the EV. It provides energy diversity for transportation, so I don't have to rely on only one source. I still enjoy driving my 2 door soft top Wrangler. It isn't great for road trips, but I still like it, and it can do road trips if the EV infrastructure isn't great in an area. Plus the top comes down. If a BEV Wrangler/Bronco competitor was made, I would consider replacing it with that, but I think range would be a problem on a short wheelbase.
Same can be said about BEVs. We drove thru northern CA the morning of the 6.5 earthquake. All gas station islands were wrapped with yellow caution tape. The Eureka and Fortuna DCFCs weren't working. Had to continue to the One Tree EA to charge.
 

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I have a Y and R1T. I believe your wife is making a decision on based on the personality of Elon Musk, not the vehicle itself. The Y is a terrific EV with the best technology and charging network. If I had to give up one or the other, it would be the R1T.
Lol yes, I am aware what is motivating her decision, and I support her.
 

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1. Is it possible and advisable to go all in and become a full ev household? (No cold feet about the rivian, as I plan on taking delivery and enjoying the heck out of it). The conventional wisdom is to keep one ice car.
Being all-EV is easy. As long as you’re not going anywhere that is really, really far from a charger for an extended period of time (eg >150 miles from a charger and need to plan for vampire drain while camping), then it’s totally doable.

We’ve been all-EV since the Rivian came (I sold my Tundra and, later, BMW 135). Have an eGolf (daughter’s commuter) and i3 (wife’s runabout and commuter). The Rivian is my commuter and the family/road-trip car.

There isn’t anything insurmountable. Worst case is if I want to go somewhere way, way off-grid … I’ll just rent a 4Runner from Toyota. Even then - planning an overlanding trip in Utah next summer in the Rivian.
 
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Gas stations near your house may be out if you don't have power, but if you drive a little further to a station fed from a different distribution circuit/feeder, you are more likely to find a gas station with power. And you can call ahead and ask them if they have power. Isolated instance, but when Hurricane Sandy hit NJ, areas were without power for days, or almost a week. I had family in NJ that would drive west, into Pennsylvania, to get gas for their portable generators. Sure, if they had a BEV back then, they could use that as a power source, until it ran out. And someone could also argue against gasoline based on the Colonial Pipeline hack for the southeast in May 2021.

For the time being, I like having an ICE and the EV. It provides energy diversity for transportation, so I don't have to rely on only one source. I still enjoy driving my 2 door soft top Wrangler. It isn't great for road trips, but I still like it, and it can do road trips if the EV infrastructure isn't great in an area. Plus the top comes down. If a BEV Wrangler/Bronco competitor was made, I would consider replacing it with that, but I think range would be a problem on a short wheelbase.
Great thoughts. Thanks for the input and for making my decision that much difficult :D
 
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I'd keep the Honda and see how it goes over a year or so.......We're two EV's (both long range) and a Hybrid Lexus. YMMV
Thanks for sharing your thoughts 🙏
 
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Being all-EV is easy. As long as you’re not going anywhere that is really, really far from a charger for an extended period of time (eg >150 miles from a charger and need to plan for vampire drain while camping), then it’s totally doable.

We’ve been all-EV since the Rivian came (I sold my Tundra and, later, BMW 135). Have an eGolf (daughter’s commuter) and i3 (wife’s runabout and commuter). The Rivian is my commuter and the family/road-trip car.

There isn’t anything insurmountable. Worst case is if I want to go somewhere way, way off-grid … I’ll just rent a 4Runner from Toyota. Even then - planning an overlanding trip in Utah next summer in the Rivian.
Thanks for sharing your thoughts 🙏
 

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Longtime lurker (1.5 years), first post. Would really appreciate any advice from more experienced folks.
Missed the pre-March prices, sulked for about a month and finally placed an order for the R1S in April 2022 (that's how much I believe in Rivian) knowing it'll be a long wait. Wife placed an order for vw id4 in August, and because we live a few hours from Chattanooga, picked her car up in October (2023 id4). I currently drive a Honda accord (but can't seem to not drive the ev. It's so exciting).

After the new delivery window update, I was moved from Jan-Dec 2024 to May-June 2023 (sorry about folks whose delivery window was pushed back. I can imagine the pain. Not gloating, as this is not the intention of this post). In all honesty, I am conditioning my mind for a delivery window of Sept-Dec, because, this is Rivian. I'll rather be surprised than disappointed.

I am thinking about trading in or selling the accord (2018) since I don't see myself driving it after the Rivian arrives. Also, the kids are young (3 years old and a 4 month old).

Here are my questions;

1. Is it possible and advisable to go all in and become a full ev household? (No cold feet about the rivian, as I plan on taking delivery and enjoying the heck out of it). The conventional wisdom is to keep one ice car.

2. How convenient would this option of an all ev household be?

3. Anything I should consider that I might be overlooking due to my excitement over evs?

We hardly take roadtrips, and we have a level 2 evse installed at home. I live only about 10 miles from work and my wife has a 100 mile round trip to work daily.

Any advice will be appreciated.

Cheers.

P.S. the accord has been fully paid off, so no loans there to worry about.
We are all EV with a Mini SE (a Little Short on Range) and I got my R1S in December. I don’t think we’ll ever go back especially with a $0.06 EV tariff at night. Considering to get an ID Buzz when they arrive in the states for my wife and we’ll keep the Mini as the fun town car until the kids need it as their first car.
 

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Thanks for the suggestion.
Our panel is maxed out right now. I guess we'll have to see how things go when the R1S arrives. Since I only drive about 30 miles round-trip daily, I may be able to get away with charging the R1S during the weekends or getting a splitter of some sort.
Good point, if you're putting less than 50 miles on the R1S on a typical day, you may be fine splitting a single circuit for overnight charging.
 

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Longtime lurker (1.5 years), first post. Would really appreciate any advice from more experienced folks.
Missed the pre-March prices, sulked for about a month and finally placed an order for the R1S in April 2022 (that's how much I believe in Rivian) knowing it'll be a long wait. Wife placed an order for vw id4 in August, and because we live a few hours from Chattanooga, picked her car up in October (2023 id4). I currently drive a Honda accord (but can't seem to not drive the ev. It's so exciting).

After the new delivery window update, I was moved from Jan-Dec 2024 to May-June 2023 (sorry about folks whose delivery window was pushed back. I can imagine the pain. Not gloating, as this is not the intention of this post). In all honesty, I am conditioning my mind for a delivery window of Sept-Dec, because, this is Rivian. I'll rather be surprised than disappointed.

I am thinking about trading in or selling the accord (2018) since I don't see myself driving it after the Rivian arrives. Also, the kids are young (3 years old and a 4 month old).

Here are my questions;

1. Is it possible and advisable to go all in and become a full ev household? (No cold feet about the rivian, as I plan on taking delivery and enjoying the heck out of it). The conventional wisdom is to keep one ice car.

2. How convenient would this option of an all ev household be?

3. Anything I should consider that I might be overlooking due to my excitement over evs?

We hardly take roadtrips, and we have a level 2 evse installed at home. I live only about 10 miles from work and my wife has a 100 mile round trip to work daily.

Any advice will be appreciated.

Cheers.

P.S. the accord has been fully paid off, so no loans there to worry about.
Ease into it. We were an all electric household from 2016-2021, and back to one again now. It’s not hard at all, but you have to get used to an EV first in general.

We do take road trips, and it becomes just another normal thing. From 2021-2022, going back to gas was just as hard as it was going to EV. It’s a habit thing
 
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Ease into it. We were an all electric household from 2016-2021, and back to one again now. It’s not hard at all, but you have to get used to an EV first in general.

We do take road trips, and it becomes just another normal thing. From 2021-2022, going back to gas was just as hard as it was going to EV. It’s a habit thing
Thanks for the tip.
 

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I have a Y and R1T. I believe your wife is making a decision on based on the personality of Elon Musk, not the vehicle itself. The Y is a terrific EV with the best technology and charging network. If I had to give up one or the other, it would be the R1T.
Disagree. We have a MYP. I really don’t like it. It’s fine for going from point a to b. But, that’s about it. Storage capacity sucks because of the sloped back, fsd isn’t worth it at all, suspension/ride comfort is rough, and rattles a lot inside (even after trying to patch them in the door panels). The one thing it’s good for is on occasional road trips, superchargers right now are more convenient. But this is going to change over the next few years.
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