$80 to Fast Charge Your Rivian!

SANZC02

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Not sure I understand how changing to the EV rate defeats purpose of solar.
You get credit based on the rate when you generate the excess. If you go to an EV plan the non-prime rates are lower so your credits are lower, you lose a lot more kw credits during peak time.

If you had battery storage to use during the peak times it would make sense to go to the EV rates. I may add a battery system to my solar this year, I wanted to see how it was with just solar first to see if the battery storage made sense or not for my use case.
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Eeyore

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I agree with all you said about the good folks up there. While I love B.C., the people I've met in visits to Alberta were great, as well. Do yourself a favor and visit Banff and Lake Louise sometime when the crowds aren't there.

When you cross the Continental Divide from Radium Hot Springs, B.C. to get over the top to Banff, you'll be amazed by the views pretty much the entire way. When at Lake Louise, it's worth the extra drive S.W. to Moraine Lake and/or North to Jasper to see The Icefields. You'll need to hit the Ranger Station just up the hill from Radium H.S. for a Park Pass, as most all of the trip from Radium H.S. on is in Provincial Parks, and they have no sense of humor about not having a pass, and also for speeding. Check out Canmore and Banff for places to stay.
Gorgeous photos. I want to go there, in my R1T. I'm not scheduled to get it until July (hopefully). That will be perfect for a fall trip.

As an aside, I saw Gordon Lightfoot in concert about 5 years ago. He looked old as dirt then, but he still could sing. Good show.
 

DuckTruck

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Gorgeous photos. I want to go there, in my R1T. I'm not scheduled to get it until July (hopefully). That will be perfect for a fall trip.

As an aside, I saw Gordon Lightfoot in concert about 5 years ago. He looked old as dirt then, but he still could sing. Good show.
I'm envious! I'd love to have seen Gordon in his prime, but would pay top dollar to see him tomorrow, as well. From the time I was a kid, I've loved his music and his stories. In later years, I also became a really huge fan of John Prine. It wasn't until John's passing at the beginning of this pandemic that I caught this video from the House of Strombo. While the music is all John's, at the 6:45 and 24:30 marks, he gives tribute to Gordon Lightfoot, who's in attendance.

John's but one of the few greats I've heard praise Gordon for his influence on better than a generation of artists. If you're not yet a fan of John's music, you might be by the end of this intimate concert. There's no denying they're both world class storytellers, and It's nice to know Gordon influenced John, and was a friend til the end.

R.I.P. John.

 

AllInev

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Just be glad you don't live in SoCal and have So Cal Edison. Our "cheap rates" are 30c per khr and go up to 49c during peak hours. Kind of makes getting an EV not worth it.
If you want to buy and EV to save money on fuel and transportation costs, an R1 is not a good choice. The R1 is one of the least efficient EVs on the market. Not a criticism, just a fact. It's big, heavy, and not aerodynamic.

NoCal electricity costs are not much better than SoCal. I just downloaded my KWh usage from PG&E for the past 12 months and, on average (rates are different throughout the day) was charged $0.32/KWh.

So fully charging my R1 (135KWh pack) at home is going to be about $45. If I get 315 miles of range, that's a cost $0.14/mile. My current ICE/hybrid car gets 40MPG with a 10 gallon tank. With a 400 mile range, it costs me $50 dollars to fill at $5/gallon. So that's $0.12/mile.

R1T - $0.14/mile
ICE/Hybrid - $0.12/mile

With the EV, they say I'll save on things like oil changes, spark plugs, air filters, etc and other maintenance. Fingers crossed.

However, I'll be spending a one-time big chunk of change upgrading my electric panels and getting a charger installed. Electric panel upgrades, $1500-$2000 are current estimates I'm getting and about the same for getting a charger installed + $500 for the charger. So could be up to $5,000 to have the ability to charge at home.

I'm also expecting the tires (expensive tires) on the R1 to not last as long because of the heavy-heavy truck.

Insurance for the Rivian also be costing me at least $200 more a year.

The R1 will not be a cost saver for me. If I wanted to go all-in-EV AND save money I would probably be buying a used Nissan Leaf or some equivalently efficient and inexpensive EV.

In short, I'm buying the R1 because I want a super-fun and really nice EV.
 

TT97

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My current ICE/hybrid car gets 40MPG with a 10 gallon tank. With a 400 mile range, it costs me $50 dollars to fill at $5/gallon. So that's $0.12/mile.
Your F-150 gets 40 MPG? Naturally, if you are replacing a compact hybrid with the R1T you are not achieving any savings, however, you need to compare a similar ICE truck with 900 lb-ft of torque for savings.
 

Dbeglor

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Your F-150 gets 40 MPG? Naturally, if you are replacing a compact hybrid with the R1T you are not achieving any savings, however, you need to compare a similar ICE truck with 900 lb-ft of torque for savings.
A TRX gets 10/14mpg, a Raptor 15/18. Conversely, people shouldn't expect savings on a Rivian when a bicycle is free to power.
 

Bullitt

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I think this is a tough conversation to compare against each other on. I’m in SoCal and have SCEs TOU-D Prime plan and I charge my Tesla M3 after 9p when the rate is .12 per KWh. It’s probably costing me around $6 for a full charge (I charge to 100% every time, unless on a roadtrip). When I charge at my local Supercharger its usually .48 per KWh And about $24 for a full charge, though I only go there when absolutely necessary and rarely charge to 100% on DCFC.

While I recognize the R1T is the opposite end of the efficiency spectrum, based on my SCE rates my assumption is a full charge will be in the neighborhood of $20 when charging off-peak at home and to the OPs point DCFC will be around $62. The R1T will most definitely save a lot in gas for me as my GX470 costs around $95 to fill locally and gets about 275 miles per tank (16 MPG).

I also have never paid tax on charging at DCFCs, so Im not sure if that differs state to state.
 

HalfFullGirl

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You get credit based on the rate when you generate the excess. If you go to an EV plan the non-prime rates are lower so your credits are lower, you lose a lot more kw credits during peak time.

If you had battery storage to use during the peak times it would make sense to go to the EV rates. I may add a battery system to my solar this year, I wanted to see how it was with just solar first to see if the battery storage made sense or not for my use case.
Understood

As I understood it in principle, net net over generating with rooftop doesn't pencil out as the sell back price is so low compared to a panel. I've always heard the best fit is to get to an annual zero cost. If that's true, then shifting to off peak use should benefit.

Again, all in theory and as many smart people on here have noted, the energy market is changing so rapidly, one needs to pencil out their specific situation with real numbers and not go on principle.

I wish I could afford a bank. Wish I'd listened back when they had better incentives (and were available even!)
 

SANZC02

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Understood

As I understood it in principle, net net over generating with rooftop doesn't pencil out as the sell back price is so low compared to a panel. I've always heard the best fit is to get to an annual zero cost. If that's true, then shifting to off peak use should benefit.

Again, all in theory and as many smart people on here have noted, the energy market is changing so rapidly, one needs to pencil out their specific situation with real numbers and not go on principle.

I wish I could afford a bank. Wish I'd listened back when they had better incentives (and were available even!)
It is hard to find how the California NEM credits work, but you can read about it here.

Essentially when offsetting your usage you get retail credit for the time of use it is generated. Whatever is left after your 12 month period is over is credited back at a much lower wholesale rate then you start building it up again.

This is for NEM 2, it Chipped away some of the original NEM benefits. They are trying to pass a NEM 3 which will chip away even more and make it much harder to get any ROI for installing solar.
 

Riv240

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Yeah, the whole NEM is getting worse which makes the whole adoption worse.

as far as the SCE plans are, you really have to crunch the numbers between let’s say the TOU 4-9, TOU prime and that regular tiered pricing. Aside from their usage rate charges (peak, non peak), there are daily charge rates which are different between the plans as well as the baseline credits (doesn’t apply to the non ev regular tiered plan). All of which are worse than the retired grandfather plans
 

hilld

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And this ignores their installation costs and the costs for them to by electricity assuming your local area had demand pricing.

Even without demand pricing, do some back math to figure out how long a station would take to make up the installation costs for a large DC fast charging station. It's a hell of a long time at a profit of $0.30/kwh.
Don't forget other items such as rent for the space, insurance, paying their employees to handle customer calls, employees for maintenance, etc.
 

hilld

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That's exactly the most important point. I think some people assume because they are being an EV its going to be cheap and efficient, but it's an 8000 lb Truck. It's not an efficient people mover.

With my Tesla, I charge 99% at home (with more solar than we use) but I think I'll charge more on the road with the Rivian and I expect rates will continue to go up.
One thing to keep in mind, the amount of DCFC is probably minimal for most users, it is needed for those longer road trips. (assuming you have a place to charge at home of course). You need to average the charging cost for the entire month/year. At home I pay 12 cents kWh and my home charger was essentially free ($500 rebate from the utility on a $530 charger). So the cost per mile will be significantly less unless you are exclusively DCFC or live in SoCal where the electric rates are sky high.
 

ironpig

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One thing to keep in mind, the amount of DCFC is probably minimal for most users, it is needed for those longer road trips. (assuming you have a place to charge at home of course). You need to average the charging cost for the entire month/year. At home I pay 12 cents kWh and my home charger was essentially free ($500 rebate from the utility on a $530 charger). So the cost per mile will be significantly less unless you are exclusively DCFC or live in SoCal where the electric rates are sky high.
Yep - I would not have an EV as my main daily driver if I wasn't able to charge at home. I produce more energy with our large solar panel set up than I use most of the year. I've only charged my Model S at super chargers a handful of times since 2014.
 

SeaGeo

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Don't forget other items such as rent for the space, insurance, paying their employees to handle customer calls, employees for maintenance, etc.
Agreed. Just showing that even without their overhead costs, it's not cheap.
 

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180kwh x 0.43 + tax? = $80
So let's say you have an ICE truck that get 20 MPG. Here in CA gas is $4.85-$5.10 per gallon. For easy math, I'll use $5.00/ gallon which works out to $100 for 400 miles (20 gallons). Max pack is 400 mile range. So $80 isn't terrible. But, I didn't get an EV until I installed solar. So my EV gas station is on my roof. If I didn't have solar, I would get a much more efficient EV than a Rivian.
 
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