CommodoreAmiga

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Apples to oranges.
The volvo video you show is of the moderate overlap, not the small overlap test. The small overlap is the one that give manufacturers fits.
The moderate has a 40% vehicle width overlap, the small 25%.

Small overlap (applies to 2016 to 2021 models):
I still see no deformation of the A-pillar in the Volvo test.





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kanundrum

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Apples to oranges.
The volvo video you show is of the moderate overlap, not the small overlap test. The small overlap is the one that give manufacturers fits.
The moderate has a 40% vehicle width overlap, the small 25%.

Small overlap (applies to 2016 to 2021 models):

Looks the same to me.

Volvo XC 90 2016 thru 2021
3675.jpg


vlcsnap-2021-02-19-23h04m03s584.png


TBH everything is moot, its not the same angle and we are just going by 1/100 of a frame. I will say for now I am in confidence of their safety crash ratings and I don't see anything out of the ordinary but results will speak for their selves.
 

CommodoreAmiga

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Looks the same to me.

Volvo XC 90 2016 thru 2021
3675.jpg


vlcsnap-2021-02-19-23h04m03s584.png


TBH everything is moot, its not the same angle and we are just going by 1/100 of a frame. I will say for now I am in confidence of their safety crash ratings and I don't see anything out of the ordinary but results will speak for their selves.
Yes, we'll have to wait for full videos that we can analyze. But those two views you've posted look pretty clear to me... The Volvo A-Pillar is straight and maintained it's position. The Rivian A-Pillar appears it may have buckled and bent outward, at the bottom.
 

mkennedy1996

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Looks the same to me.

Volvo XC 90 2016 thru 2021
3675.jpg


vlcsnap-2021-02-19-23h04m03s584.png


TBH everything is moot, its not the same angle and we are just going by 1/100 of a frame. I will say for now I am in confidence of their safety crash ratings and I don't see anything out of the ordinary but results will speak for their selves.
Did anyone else notice that the wheels don't appear to be one piece rims, but appear to have a hubcap for appearance. See attached photo:
vlcsnap-2021-02-19-23h04m03s584.png
 

electruck

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The Rivian A-Pillar appears it may have buckled and bent outward, at the bottom.
We definitely need some better video but zoom in and take a close look at this region. I'm not convinced there isn't a piece of debris creating the illusion of more deformation than there really was. In particular, follow the line of crash test "target" decals running down the a-pillar and note the additional white blotch which appears to overlap the decal at the base of the a-pillar.

apillar_small_overlap_3.png
 

electruck

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Did anyone else notice that the wheels don't appear to be one piece rims, but appear to have a hubcap for appearance. See attached photo:
vlcsnap-2021-02-19-23h04m03s584.png
Kind of looks like that but the fact that these are flow formed wheels means that is actually the face of the wheel after being sheared off the barrel.
 

CommodoreAmiga

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We definitely need some better video but zoom in and take a close look at this region. I'm not convinced there isn't a piece of debris creating the illusion of more deformation than there really was. In particular, follow the line of crash test "target" decals running down the a-pillar and note the additional white blotch which appears to overlap the decal at the base of the a-pillar.

apillar_small_overlap_3.png
I hope you’re right. I WANT Rivian to ace the crash tests. As I mentioned, previously, safety is one of my utmost concerns.

But it seems you can agree that this picture does raise some questions. Perhaps the A-Pillar has deformed? Perhaps it’s debris? Perhaps the pillar “flexes” as energy is transmitted around the cage and this frame captures the pillar in a state that it does not remain? We don’t know yet.

Ultimately, we need to see the full crash test video, including slow-motion, and be able to play/rewind and analyze.
 

CommodoreAmiga

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Did anyone else notice that the wheels don't appear to be one piece rims, but appear to have a hubcap for appearance. See attached photo:
vlcsnap-2021-02-19-23h04m03s584.png
Kind of looks like that but the fact that these are flow formed wheels means that is actually the face of the wheel after being sheared off the barrel.
Yep, they are one-piece wheels, based on the latest info we have from Rivian. This is simply the wheel face sheering off. That is not uncommon for this type of crash, so it doesn’t concern me.
 

Ladiver

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What does it matter if the A pillar is deformed? The passenger compartment was safe and the truck is totaled. A live person would survive. That’s what I look for in safety. The vehicles are designed to crumble around the passenger compartment.

I don’t think you can buff this one out!
 

kanundrum

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I hope you’re right. I WANT Rivian to ace the crash tests. As I mentioned, previously, safety is one of my utmost concerns.

But it seems you can agree that this picture does raise some questions. Perhaps the A-Pillar has deformed? Perhaps it’s debris? Perhaps the pillar “flexes” as energy is transmitted around the cage and this frame captures the pillar in a state that it does not remain? We don’t know yet.

Ultimately, we need to see the full crash test video, including slow-motion, and be able to play/rewind and analyze.

I was also thinking the A Pillar Trim is a little flared naturally by design so could be weird angles.

1613804164779.png

In any case as mentioned before a 720p screenshot is probably not enough evidence to base anything off of so I will definitely wait for IIHS results.

The test could also be older with a improved design so I will hold nay judgement until we know "FINAL INFORMATION" what ever day that may be 😂 😂 😂
 

CommodoreAmiga

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What does it matter if the A pillar is deformed? The passenger compartment was safe and the truck is totaled. A live person would survive.
We don't know how the dummy inside fared. We haven't seen the data. The reason the (possible) deformation concerns me is that the NHTSA crash tests are quite specific and controlled. They don't test every edge case nor do they test at every speed. Although they are certainly better than nothing, it's not reasonable to assert the NHTSA tests cover all scenarios we subject ourselves to, while operating our vehicles on public roads.

The frontal small-overlap test is done at 40mph with a stationary barrier. Imagine traveling down the highway at 55-70mph and a car traveling in the opposite direction (also at 55-70mph) crosses over the double-yellow/median. You swerve, and although you don't hit completely head on, there is a small-overlap. The amount of energy that must be dissipated is considerably greater than in the NHTSA test. Not only are you traveling at a much faster speed (higher energy) but also the object you're colliding with is not stationary, but rather is traveling at a high speed towards you (higher energy).

IF the A-pillar deforms in the NHTSA test -- even if it passes the test -- I'm concerned that it may fail in the real-world.

I'm not saying it will. I'm simply saying it's a concern I have, and I want to see more data.
 

DucRider

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IF the A-pillar deforms in the NHTSA test -- even if it passes the test -- I'm concerned that it may fail in the real-world.
If the A pillar does not deform, but winds up pushed into the passenger compartment?
 

skyote

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I'm not knowledgeable in this stuff, but feel this is probably safer than anything I currently drive.
 

CommodoreAmiga

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If the A pillar does not deform, but winds up pushed into the passenger compartment?
Sure that’s not good. What if you get a splinter in your eye? What if you tripped fell in the shower? We can go on and on and on about bad things… But there are plenty of vehicles who pass this test without the forming the a pillar in the a pillar doesn’t go in and kill you either.
 

DucRider

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Sure that’s not good. What if you get a splinter in your eye? What if you tripped fell in the shower? We can go on and on and on about bad things… But there are plenty of vehicles who pass this test without the forming the a pillar in the a pillar doesn’t go in and kill you either.
The point is the actual cabin intrusion and forces applied to the test dummies are vastly more important than whether any particular part bends. None of this can be reliably derived from the videos.

As an example (XC90):
1613851070863.png


1613851146557.png


Vehicles are designed to function as a system and focusing on a single part may or may not be indicative of the overall results. The Dodge Ram shows no A pillar deformation but has problems with cabin intrusion and forces applied to the test dummies in even the moderate overlap test.

Too soon to draw conclusions about occupant safety until the actual test data is released, but if a non-deforming A pillar is a "must have", you'll likely need to move on to another vehicle.
 

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