Autolycus

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The link below is to a Google Map that I have created with 3 layers. It is pretty raw right now, so I'll put all the information about it first. The link should stay good even as I try to polish things up over time.

I also can't promise that it will always be up to date. If Rivian changes locations on their map, well... those aren't going to be updated on mine because I won't necessarily ever learn that they've updated it, and too many updates will simply take time that I might not have for this project. If someone lets me know, I might be able to do one-off updates. If someone lets me know of major changes to the RAN map, I can probably do some bigger updates.

The 3 layers:
1) The RAN addresses that are "known" or guessed based on information in other threads in this forum -- right now it's the Salida, CO location and the locations shared for CA that were based on utility jobs involving PG&E.

2) Crudely-place points for RAN locations based on the Rivian.com map. They're crudely placed because all we can extract from the Rivian map is a fairly high-level of zoom with large icons. The icons appear to mostly be placed in the city or general area anyway. These are not exact locations and should only be treated as being within a 10-15 mile radius. They also don't reflect actual charging stations, just the areas that Rivian is loosely planning to put locations. I hope to name these points, but that's very time-consuming. A possible solution for that might be coming, and if it does will be reflected in an updated version of this layer. These points are based on the RAN map on 6/26/2021.

3) Electrify America locations I pulled from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's data on alternative fuel stations, including EV chargers. This data is good as of 6/26/2021.

https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/2/edit?mid=1F-jpeAQfTwoHqy4dYtOStXLckGA714TJ&usp=sharing

If there are any features that people think are critical to this being usable, let me know and I can try to add them. Please keep in mind that some of this is time consuming and I do have a full-time job and other responsibilities and hobbies, so I make NO promises about adding anything or when it might happen. :)

If anybody is interested, I can share a geo-referenced TIFF file of the RAN map that I screen-capped from their website in pieces, stitched together, and then geo-referenced in QGIS. It can be opened in Google Earth if anybody wants to play with that at all. I can also share a KML file that has all of these unlabeled RAN points.

Finally, if automating the point names isn't doable, I will probably have to defer to others who are interested in crowdsourcing some of this. In that situation, I can share the map through Google Drive to let others edit. More on that if needed.

UPDATE (7/9/21):
1) I added a 4th layer: Rivian service and/or sales locations. I will start adding to it this weekend based on location information in this forum. (minor update 7/10: I added the ones that looked like very solid addresses from the thread on service centers and showrooms)
2) I am starting to add fields for additional data for each point, including status (permit, construction, online, ??). I will also try to have Google use different icons and/or colors for each status. It should work perfectly, but there are so few points with different statuses right now that I'm not 100% sure it will scale the way I expect. (minor update 7/10: I have also added a field for the source for the info, usually a URL to a RivianForums post or to a news article.)
3) Automating the point names for my "crude placement" layer was going to end up being trickier than the time it would actually save. I was able to churn out about 100 in an hour while watching tv (so not moving as quickly as I could with 100% attention). I will keep churning on that over time. Eventually I will get them all named, but honestly I don't think the names really matter all that much, so I'm not in a big rush.
4) I am going to look at some other options for this whole setup beyond just the basic Google My Maps. Those may allow a little more flexibility on crowdsourcing updated locations or status. "Free" is currently the most important criterion though, so I think it's going to stay where it is for now. The good news is that the data should be easily exportable from My Maps, so work done now won't go to waste if I change later.





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SoCal Rob

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Thanks for doing the work and sharing! I am curious to see the actual location of the Yucca Valley/Joshua Tree site. Hopefully Rivian will publish, or some sleuth will find, the specific site. It’s a great general location with off-roading possibilities in the Yucca Valley to Big Bear area, Joshua Tree National Park and mining roads, plus Johnson Valley.
 

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One of the cool things that becomes apparent when looking at combination of RAN and EA is that Rivian seems to have put some effort in to supplement EA and generally isn't planning on stations in the same places that EA is. Which I suspect makes their build out even more aggressive since they may have to fight for new backbone installations to get the power where they need vs piggybacking on EA and Tesla.
 

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Thanks for putting this together. I hope this is not comprehensive because there are still a number of worrisome gaps based on this map, even though the number of sites listed exceeds Rivian's initial 600-site count.
 
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Autolycus

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Thanks for putting this together. I hope this is not comprehensive because there are still a number of worrisome gaps based on this map, even though the number of sites listed exceeds Rivian's initial 600-site count.
It is "comprehensive" in that it reflects all of the points they show on their map to be built by the end of 2023. I imagine they will add more sites in the future. I don't think this will be the location of every charging station they ever build, just like a "coming soon" map on Tesla.com in 2017 would not have show many many stations that now exist.
 

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It is "comprehensive" in that it reflects all of the points they show on their map to be built by the end of 2023. I imagine they will add more sites in the future. I don't think this will be the location of every charging station they ever build, just like a "coming soon" map on Tesla.com in 2017 would not have show many many stations that now exist.
I meant comprehensive in terms of their initial 3,500 chargers across 600 sites. One of Rivian's stated goals for RAN was to provide access to currently inaccessible areas, which this map doesn't really demonstrate. Outside of I-94, this network wouldn't significantly improve access beyond what is already covered by the public fast charging infrastructure, and it leaves significant gaps that would require Rivian owners to use the public charging infrastructure.

Basically, there are at least a dozen charging site locations that I was hoping to see with the initial RAN build out that are nowhere on that map.

To end on a positive note, I do think that a number of the RAN sites that are near existing public charging sites are still beneficial, as we are starting to see the load on those public sites increase thanks to healthy Bolt EV, ID.4, and Mach-E sales.
 
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Autolycus

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I meant comprehensive in terms of their initial 3,500 chargers across 600 sites. One of Rivian's stated goals for RAN was to provide access to currently inaccessible areas, which this map doesn't really demonstrate. Outside of I-94, this network wouldn't significantly improve access beyond what is already covered by the public fast charging infrastructure, and it leaves significant gaps that would require Rivian owners to use the public charging infrastructure.

Basically, there are at least a dozen charging site locations that I was hoping to see with the initial RAN build out that are nowhere on that map.

To end on a positive note, I do think that a number of the RAN sites that are near existing public charging sites are still beneficial, as we are starting to see the load on those public sites increase thanks to healthy Bolt EV, ID.4, and Mach-E sales.
I hate to say it, but prepare to be disappointed. I think this is going to be pretty close to it through at least 2023. Beyond that, who knows. They haven't announced any plans beyond this current map, so it's impossible to do anything more than baseless speculation.

In general though, I think you're overstating it when you say it only really improves things in the I-94 corridor. They are definitely adding sites in some parts of the country that are current very lacking and that do involve a lot of outdoor/adventure activities:

1) Oregon. EA covers I5 and I84 corridors and then there's a random station in Bend. RAN covers those plus US-97 and several sites along the Oregon coast that are pushing it for EA's network.

2) Rocky Mountain States. EA covers the major interstate corridors and that's it. RAN give significantly better access to the pretty much all of Colorado and Wyoming, the major Utah parks, and the Grand Canyon. EA's current expansion plans for that region include a few more stations in Denver and along the Frontage Range and that's it. That are massive gaps in the Rockies for EA and other major networks. It looks to me like the RAN will fill in a lot of those.

3) Northeast, especially VT, NH, and ME. EA is pretty sparse. For EA I see just 1 station in Albany, 1 station in Manchester, 2 stations in southern Maine along I95 to Portland, and 19 stations concentrated in metro areas of CT, RI and MA. The RAN map has stations all the way up to Canada on all of the I87, I91, I93, and I95 corridors plus a station way the heck up near the border at Calais. That's HOURS of additional driving north that will be supported by RAN that are not supported by EA--and is not in of EA's public expansion plans.

That's not to mention other smaller gaps that don't seem too big but that can be a real problem for hiking or scenic drive trips in Southern Appalachia, like the Blue Ridge Parkway, and other areas of the country. It doesn't seem like much, but RAN sites in Robbinsville, Cherokee, and Blowing Rock, NC plus Sevier County TN open up a LOT of outdoor activities that can be a real challenge with the EA network (and Tesla as well). There's a DCFC wasteland in N. Georgia and NC/TN mountain region with Asheville and Knoxville (both along I-40) as the only options for DCFC.

There are certainly still gaps in the RAN. I recommend you email Rivian and suggest where more stations make sense and why. I imagine they will keep a good list of such things and if a potential site looks promising, they'll eventually add it to their plans.
 
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Autolycus

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Here are maps of the areas I was talking about:

Screen Shot 2021-06-30 at 4.29.56 PM.png


Screen Shot 2021-06-30 at 4.30.53 PM.png


Screen Shot 2021-06-30 at 4.31.37 PM.png


Screen Shot 2021-06-30 at 4.32.09 PM.png
 

NewsCoulomb

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I hate to say it, but prepare to be disappointed. I think this is going to be pretty close to it through at least 2023. Beyond that, who knows. They haven't announced any plans beyond this current map, so it's impossible to do anything more than baseless speculation.

In general though, I think you're overstating it when you say it only really improves things in the I-94 corridor. They are definitely adding sites in some parts of the country that are current very lacking and that do involve a lot of outdoor/adventure activities:

1) Oregon. EA covers I5 and I84 corridors and then there's a random station in Bend. RAN covers those plus US-97 and several sites along the Oregon coast that are pushing it for EA's network.

2) Rocky Mountain States. EA covers the major interstate corridors and that's it. RAN give significantly better access to the pretty much all of Colorado and Wyoming, the major Utah parks, and the Grand Canyon. EA's current expansion plans for that region include a few more stations in Denver and along the Frontage Range and that's it. That are massive gaps in the Rockies for EA and other major networks. It looks to me like the RAN will fill in a lot of those.

3) Northeast, especially VT, NH, and ME. EA is pretty sparse. For EA I see just 1 station in Albany, 1 station in Manchester, 2 stations in southern Maine along I95 to Portland, and 19 stations concentrated in metro areas of CT, RI and MA. The RAN map has stations all the way up to Canada on all of the I87, I91, I93, and I95 corridors plus a station way the heck up near the border at Calais. That's HOURS of additional driving north that will be supported by RAN that are not supported by EA--and is not in of EA's public expansion plans.

That's not to mention other smaller gaps that don't seem too big but that can be a real problem for hiking or scenic drive trips in Southern Appalachia, like the Blue Ridge Parkway, and other areas of the country. It doesn't seem like much, but RAN sites in Robbinsville, Cherokee, and Blowing Rock, NC plus Sevier County TN open up a LOT of outdoor activities that can be a real challenge with the EA network (and Tesla as well). There's a DCFC wasteland in N. Georgia and NC/TN mountain region with Asheville and Knoxville (both along I-40) as the only options for DCFC.

There are certainly still gaps in the RAN. I recommend you email Rivian and suggest where more stations make sense and why. I imagine they will keep a good list of such things and if a potential site looks promising, they'll eventually add it to their plans.
As someone who is somewhat knowledgeable about the public charging infrastructure as a whole, I would caution against limiting your assessment of the public charging infrastructure's capability to Electrify America's branded network (per the map). While it is true that EA hosts a majority of the nation's >50 kW charging stations, they are by no means the sole provider of faster public charging. In addition to Electrify America's own, branded chargers, they are also funding additional charging hardware that will support routes such as I-90 through South Dakota.

Also, GM is funding what appears to be 600+ EVgo charging sites with 350 kW chargers, and their scheduled buildout is similar to Rivian's. ChargePoint is ramping up their production of 125 kW paired chargers (CPE250), and in addition to the dozens of sites where they are already deployed (such as in Colorado and Eastern Oregon), hosts such as 7-Eleven have announce hundreds more of those sites. And these are not just upcoming chargers. Some of these faster than 50 kW charging networks are already built out (though they are still expanding), such as Francis Solar's 150 kW charging network and Evolve NY's 350 kW charging network.
 

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Finally, if automating the point names isn't doable, I will probably have to defer to others who are interested in crowdsourcing some of this. In that situation, I can share the map through Google Drive to let others edit. More on that if needed.

This is a great effort, and I'm wondering how you and the community feel about crowdsourcing 'improved' guesses of the locations based upon local knowledge of the proposed sites. For example I'm very familiar with the I-93 corridor from Boston to Canada and suspect Rivian would prefer to utilize the Hooksett rest areas, which are south of the I-89/93 interchange (and have banks of Tesla chargers already) as well as the Franconia Notch parking lot instead of a location in Lincoln, NH (keeping in the sprit of Rivian's desire for chargers in parks 'where you play')

...I'm not certain if this is constructive or not...
 
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Autolycus

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As someone who is somewhat knowledgeable about the public charging infrastructure as a whole, I would caution against limiting your assessment of the public charging infrastructure's capability to Electrify America's branded network (per the map). While it is true that EA hosts a majority of the nation's >50 kW charging stations, they are by no means the sole provider of faster public charging. In addition to Electrify America's own, branded chargers, they are also funding additional charging hardware that will support routes such as I-90 through South Dakota.

Also, GM is funding what appears to be 600+ EVgo charging sites with 350 kW chargers, and their scheduled buildout is similar to Rivian's. ChargePoint is ramping up their production of 125 kW paired chargers (CPE250), and in addition to the dozens of sites where they are already deployed (such as in Colorado and Eastern Oregon), hosts such as 7-Eleven have announce hundreds more of those sites. And these are not just upcoming chargers. Some of these faster than 50 kW charging networks are already built out (though they are still expanding), such as Francis Solar's 150 kW charging network and Evolve NY's 350 kW charging network.
I tried to pull the NREL list for EVGo's network, but I am getting errors, unfortunately. I'd love to add it and others to my Google Map as new layers. As you note though, EA has the vast majority of the existing >50kW stations. Just from a quick look at Plugshare, EVGo has a pretty small number of >50kW stations and a good number of 50kW stations. You're absolutely right that all of these networks will be expanded. Most of that will happen closer to cities and along major interstate routes because that's where demand will be the highest. Most of those networks will overlap quite a lot. There will also be some networks that see opportunities in more remote areas where there might only need to be a few actual chargers to support demand. Rivian will probably be a part of that, and their map already shows a decent amount of willingness to build in areas that others haven't so far.

Looking at Plugshare for some of the areas I mentioned earlier... Wyoming seems to have a grand total of 1 charger site that is at least 50kW. The 4-corners area has several 50kW sites but there are gaps that make it very difficult to really do much exploring in that area. There's a big gap in 50kW sites in Oregon between Bend and Klammath Falls, just 2 sites >50kW along the coast, and only the 1 EA site (in Bend) along the US 97 corridor that's >50kW.

The good news is that in 10 years, charging stations should be ubiquitous in nearly every decent-sized market and along any even moderately-trafficked route.
 

NewsCoulomb

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I tried to pull the NREL list for EVGo's network, but I am getting errors, unfortunately. I'd love to add it and others to my Google Map as new layers. As you note though, EA has the vast majority of the existing >50kW stations. Just from a quick look at Plugshare, EVGo has a pretty small number of >50kW stations and a good number of 50kW stations. You're absolutely right that all of these networks will be expanded. Most of that will happen closer to cities and along major interstate routes because that's where demand will be the highest. Most of those networks will overlap quite a lot. There will also be some networks that see opportunities in more remote areas where there might only need to be a few actual chargers to support demand. Rivian will probably be a part of that, and their map already shows a decent amount of willingness to build in areas that others haven't so far.

Looking at Plugshare for some of the areas I mentioned earlier... Wyoming seems to have a grand total of 1 charger site that is at least 50kW. The 4-corners area has several 50kW sites but there are gaps that make it very difficult to really do much exploring in that area. There's a big gap in 50kW sites in Oregon between Bend and Klammath Falls, just 2 sites >50kW along the coast, and only the 1 EA site (in Bend) along the US 97 corridor that's >50kW.

The good news is that in 10 years, charging stations should be ubiquitous in nearly every decent-sized market and along any even moderately-trafficked route.
Yes, PlugShare still needs to work on their filters a bit. They put the burden on the charging provider to include charging speed in the profile, which they often don't do. EVgo is a bit of an odd duck right now because they also host a large number of 100 kW chargers, which might or might not be considered "fast," depending on how we look at them.

As for Wyoming, EA might have finally gotten the message on that as they've committed to expanding to that state. The gaps they left on I-25, I-80, and I-90 are indefensible given the purpose of their network.

I suppose my big concern for Rivian is, there are very specific gaps that EV owners from every automaker I know of (including Tesla) have been asking to be addressed. For instance, you're clearly concerned with Eastern Oregon, but as someone from California (with the largest EV-owning population in the United States), how is it that I can't drive from Reno to Bend, OR directly? In any EV. If this is the complete RAN map, it doesn't address that either. From where I'm sitting, the four DC fast charging sites already on Highway 97 in Eastern Oregon are better than the nothing at all we have on Highway 395 in Northern California and Eastern Oregon.

It looks like Rivian will address a worrisome gap in New Mexico, but I don't know whether Truth or Consequences is going to be enough. There's a lot of rough country without adequate coverage. Carlsbad, Roswell, and Socorro all need fast chargers, in my opinion.
 

R1S Maineiac

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Here are maps of the areas I was talking about:

Screen Shot 2021-06-30 at 4.29.56 PM.png


Screen Shot 2021-06-30 at 4.30.53 PM.png


Screen Shot 2021-06-30 at 4.31.37 PM.png


Screen Shot 2021-06-30 at 4.32.09 PM.png
there is not much level 3 charging available in Maine anyway, outside of Tesla. The state is helping out, but all of their dcfc stations top out at 50 kW.
 

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