Ambri: A Battery that Could Change the World

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There is some VERY interesting Internet info on an MIT startup company, Ambri, begun by a Professor Donald Sadoway and some of his students.

The battery consists, currently, of a low density liquid metal, a salt layer (in the middle as an electrolyte), and a high density liquid metal, Antimony on the bottom. There is a sketch of this provided for understanding.

This is (currently) not something that can be used in other than commercial applications. However it overcomes all the overheating problems of lithium based batteries, is easily recyclable, and projected to last 10 years. The battery materials actually become more highly refined as the battery is used.

This is the sort of battery that should be hoped for, eventually, for EVs, because of its simplicity, low cost and ease of manufacture.

The link to the interview is:
and titled: “Ambri: A Battery that Could Change the World

Typical usage would be wind farms, dedicated residential power and virtually anything, currently, that is a stationary power source. The battery requires that it be heated to operating temperature for it to function.

How it works is the low density metal on the top, when a load is applied, wants to join with the metal in the bottom as it passes through the electrolyte. As a result it becomes ionized and electrons pass through the circuit creating electrical energy. The battery is recharged in reverse. The electrolyte moves downward during discharge as the low density metal is ionized passing through the electrolyte. The electrolyte moves oppositely when the battery is charged. It appears from the description that some sort of sight gage could be used to reveal the state of charge/discharge.

It’s also evident, unless other design considerations are introduced, that the battery must always be operated with the low density metal on top. How vibration and position might effect it could also be an issue, since the materials are in liquid form (not suggested for aircraft engaged in acrobatics, unless gyroscopically positioned-LOL).

I’m not an electrochemist either, but possibly with further research small batteries needed for various other uses might be created using this principal
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Craigins

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I've been watching them for awhile.

Best application would be for augmenting DCFC stations. Similar to the one posted here in Colorado that was using a lithium based solution.

The temps required and the liquid nature I can't see it being used in mobile applications.

Sadly a coworker said that the technology is not commercial ready yet. Which kind of shows with their press release history.
 

RideAlong

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Sounds interesting - right up to when there is a container breach 😬
 
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