Rivian vs Tesla skateboard chassis

Discussion in 'Rivian Versus Competitors' started by GreenMonster, Mar 7, 2019.

  1. GreenMonster

    GreenMonster Member

    Vehicles:
    MB GLE
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2018
    Location:
    Boston
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    7
    So Rivian and Tesla both use so called skateboard chassis. They look and sound very similar with both housing the battery packs, wheels, suspension, brakes, and motors. Does Rivian's skateboard have any improvements or advantages?
     
  2. ElectricTrucking

    ElectricTrucking Well-Known Member

    Vehicles:
    Porsche 911
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2018
    Location:
    Cave Creek AZ
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    71
    #2 ElectricTrucking, Mar 25, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2019
    My concern is about the issues of half shafts on the Model X and to a degree with the Model S. Many comments on the Tesla forums about this problem. I hope Rivian is aware of this problem which seems to be related to the air suspension on Tesla model X and S. Too high of a driving height and heavy acceleration seem to cause wear on the pivot points. Tesla, not having a solution blames aggressive driving. Some owners say they have the problem even though they drive their vehicle on low level. For this very reason I've shied away from Tesla. This could be a big design flaw. Lets hope Rivian goes in a different direction with their air suspension. Have not read about these issues with air suspension on ICE vehicles but maybe they don't have such a large range of height.
     
    Hmp10 likes this.
  3. Electric Rivilution

    First Name:
    Bill
    Vehicles:
    2016 Model X P90D
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2019
    Location:
    Scottsdale
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    10
    Yup. Half shafts on my Model X have been vibrating when full out accelerating and are due for replacement. Issue is they don't even have an ETA on when the replacement axle will come in. It's been 2 months already. :headbang: Hoping no such problems on Rivian's. Good thing is they can learn from all the teething issues that Teslas have experienced.
     
    Hmp10 likes this.
  4. GJMOH

    GJMOH Member

    Vehicles:
    2008 Lamdcruiser, 2014 Corvette
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2019
    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Do they touch on this issue here:(3:02)
    ?
     
  5. Hmp10

    Hmp10 Well-Known Member

    Vehicles:
    2015 Tesla Model S P90D; 2018 Honda Odyssey
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2019
    Location:
    Naples, FL
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    169
    It may be more than a matter of suspension height. Very few ICE vehicles of similar weight to a Tesla or Rivian are capable of the acceleration these vehicles are. I bought a Model S P85 precisely because I am an acceleration addict. I have been endlessly amazed at how fast a 5,000-pound sedan can accelerate. The tires are relatively skinny for a vehicle of that weight, so I'm sure the system is modulating the wheel spin. Even so, the Tesla is noticeably quicker than the Audi R8 V10 I traded in for it. But I have sometimes wondered how intense the strain on the driveline components must be. Tesla warns of accelerated driveline wear when you use "ludicrous" mode, but even doing full acceleration runs in "insane" mode (3.2 seconds to 60 in my car) must exert incredible force on the drive shafts, especially given the car's weight.

    At about three and a half years in, my Tesla developed a crack in a battery pack weld and a failure in the rear drive unit (inverter and motor combined). I half expected Tesla to run the history on my car and argue that the failures were induced by too much hard acceleration. They never uttered a word and replaced everything under warranty, even putting in a 90 kW battery pack, and upgraded J-generation rear motor, and all the software to a P90 model. (They even rebadged the car.)

    A Rivian is going to weigh almost 1,000 pounds more than a Tesla Model S while claiming the same acceleration figures as Teslas in "insane" mode. It means the driveline is going to have to be extremely robust, especially given the height adjustment range. I know of almost no production vehicles of that weight which can claim such quickness.
     

Share This Page