0-60 in 3 seconds: are you OK with that?

Discussion in 'R1S SUV Discussions' started by Another Brother, Jul 13, 2019.

  1. Edax Rerum

    Edax Rerum New Member

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    At risk of forming a tangent, I have shared this concern. I've been bracing myself to only have about 350 miles of real world range with the 180 kWh battery pack, just so I'm not too disappointed when it isn't over 400.
     
  2. Hmp10

    Hmp10 Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure the ranges cited by Rivian are based on a fully-charged battery pack. Unless Rivian will have graphene ball technology or some other new battery technology available to them by the time they build the vehicles, you won't be able to top the batteries off very often without accelerated degradation. Tesla recommends only charging up to 85% capacity for routine use. If that is the case for Rivian, you'll probably start most days with just under 350 miles of indicated range on the 185 kWh pack (410 miles x .85). Then you'd have to reduce the range further to adjust for actual driving conditions that impact range adversely: cold weather, precipitation, driving at typical interstate speeds, carrying a heavy payload, a lot of stop-and-go driving, etc.

    If you only charge up to 85% and want to drive your Rivian as you would most ICE vehicles (in other words, not trying to hyper-mile), my guess is that 250 miles is a more realistic figure for the 185 kWh pack. That's not as disappointing as it sounds. Drivers average about 1,000 - 1,200 miles a month on a vehicle. That would mean only 4-5 charges a month up to 85%. Unless you are on a road trip, it would be a very rare day in which most drivers would get anywhere near to driving 250 miles. If, like most EV drivers, you plug in every night at home, you would never have to think about range except on long road trips.

    In fact, I think any of the three battery packs would be more than sufficient for daily local driving for almost anyone without ever subjecting them to range anxiety. The real difference in the packs as far as range goes is that the larger packs give you more flexibility in planning long road trips -- both in terms of more route choices and less frequent charging stopovers.
     
  3. azjohnny

    azjohnny Well-Known Member

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    With BEVs I firmly believe go with the biggest battery you can afford. As stated in the post I would expect between 250-300 miles while charging to 80-85% whether at home or DC fast charging. As far as trips in the woods I am still concerned about charging locations. I frequent areas in norther AZ which do have some Tesla SCers ( a new being built close to the entry at the Grand Canyon south rim) I am still going to wait to see what the Tesla truck will look like but the R1S does suit me better ( easier and safer for a dog crate and hunting equipment)
     
  4. PoorPilot

    PoorPilot Well-Known Member

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    For reference, I see half a dozen or so places to charge at the I40/64 intersection with several more as you head north on 64 into the park. They may not be DC fast chargers, but it’s a place to charge. It also looks like there are a few places to charge on the North Rim.
     
  5. ElectricTrucking

    ElectricTrucking Well-Known Member

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    Not being a fast charger but it is a place to charge in my view is not good enough if you are just doing a stop for that purpose. Waiting for possibly hours would drive me insane.
     
  6. PoorPilot

    PoorPilot Well-Known Member

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    I hear you, but who knows what will be installed in the next year or two to supplement the slower charging spots. Another option is find a spot to charge that’s connected to a hotel. These are popping up at more and more places around the country. Again, you may not get the fast DC charging, but if you plug in at dinner time, then leave the next morning, you’re still going to get roughly 200 miles at even 20miles/hr charge rate. I specifically look for hotels with a charging spot now when I’m on a multi-day road trip. It’s like getting a free tank of gas while you sleep at most places.

    **I haven’t had much luck with the Blink network. The fastest rate I’ve seen was about 9miles/hour. Not worth it, in my opinion.**
     
  7. Lmirafuente

    Lmirafuente Well-Known Member

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    I posted this in another thread on this forum that may be relevant to the charging station subject...

    When I was at the Overland West Expo and talked with RJ he gave us a great bit of info on charging stations. He asked us if we knew how many gas stations there are in the USA. We clearly did not know and thought in the millions, but actually there are only 168,000. He also asked how long do you think it takes to get a new gas station built---It takes three years! Guess how long it takes to get a charging station up? --- It takes one month.

    You should also know that all Chevron gas stations will be outfitted with EV Charging stations. The first prototypes are already working here in California. ( https://electrek.co/2019/05/20/chevron-ev-charging-gas-stations/ ). The link I provided also indicates that other oil companies are seeing the writing on the walls for change. We are in the midst of the fourth industrial revolution--yes it is a thing. EV's are here to stay.
     
    Hmp10 and Brewbud like this.
  8. Jimmie311

    Jimmie311 Member

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    In Denver, I asked this question specifically. I was told that ride height would automatically adjust at certain speeds, but the driver would also have the option to override to the ride height of their choice - with the exception of the "squat mode," which can only be used while the vehicle is parked.
     
  9. Lmirafuente

    Lmirafuente Well-Known Member

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    I would concur on this too as I heard the same when I was at the Overland West Expo.
     

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