Autolycus

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DuckTruck

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https://www.tn.gov/environment/news...er-on-electric-vehicle-charging-stations.html

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) announced today it is partnering with electric vehicle (EV) automaker and automotive technology company Rivian to install Rivian Waypoint EV charging stations at Tennessee State Parks.
The goal is to have charging stations available at all 56 state parks systemwide, depending on the availability of electricity and planned future park upgrades.
“Tennessee is at the forefront of innovation and infrastructure development, and we're committed to the future of the automotive industry,” Governor Bill Lee said. “This collaboration will support Tennessee jobs and enhance our already unmatched state parks.”

“As Tennesseans increasingly rely on electric vehicles, our state parks can play a significant role to enable recreation in all corners of our state,” TDEC Commissioner David Salyers said. “TDEC is committed to clean air, and the shift toward electric vehicles is an excellent step forward for air quality.”
“Tennessee’s State Parks will be home to some of our very first Rivian Waypoints and at the forefront of our plan to provide accessible EV charging to those adventuring in America’s most beautifully preserved environments,” Matt Horton, executive vice president of Energy and Charging Solutions at Rivian, said.

Rivian will oversee the design and installation of the Level 2 chargers, which are compatible with all EV models currently on the road. The open-network chargers can provide up to 11.5 kilowatts of power, enabling EV drivers to top up on miles while enjoying a day trip or an overnight campout. EV charging at Tennessee State Parks will initially be free and drivers will be able to easily monitor their vehicle’s charging session via the Rivian app. Any potential future cost to drivers may be dependent on systemwide utilization to recover electricity costs.
In addition to overseeing design and installation, Rivian will provide any necessary utility upgrades associated with the charger installation at no cost to the state or taxpayers. Rivian will also cover all network access fees, equipment service, and maintenance for 10 years.

Under the estimated timeline, Rivian will begin site surveys and engineering over the summer, with installation beginning as early as fall 2021 and stretching into March 2022.
“We are very excited for this partnership, and for TDEC and Tennessee State Parks’ commitment to sustainable travel, ensuring residents and visitors enjoy the state for generations to come,” Mark Ezell, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development, said. “Tennessee offers unsurpassed natural beauty, and we’re thrilled this project will bring visitors to state parks, rural communities and cities.”
Founded in 2009, Rivian has development centers in the United States, Canada, and England, including a 3.3-million-square-foot manufacturing plant in Normal, Ill. More information is available at rivian.com.



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The agreement with Rivian is the latest development stemming from TDEC’s commitment to power the growth of EVs across Tennessee and reduce barriers to transportation electrification. Earlier this year, TDEC and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) announced a partnership to develop a statewide EV charging network that will provide fast-charging stations every 50 miles along Tennessee’s interstates and highways. The initiative is designed to add approximately 50 new fast-charging locations throughout the state.


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I think the combination of this partnership, the plan to have TVA charging stations every 50 miles, and Tennessee's growing footprint in automotive manufacturing increases the likelihood we'll hear that they'll be home to Rivian's next production facility(ies).

I hope we continue to see additional State Park partnerships across the land. More importantly, I'd like to see all States step up to the plate to fill in the holes in our charging network. As we move forward with upgrading our national power grid, it's the perfect time to provide increased capacity and facilities in addition to improving transmission efficiencies and reliabilty. What happened in Texas last Winter and the annual Summertime blackouts around the country should be a thing of the past. Also, we need to grow the infrastructure needed to support the increasing EV charging needs in both single and multi-family setttings.

I know the anti-nuke crowd won't be happy, but modern nuclear plants may be exactly what we need to help clear the atmosphere of fossil fuels' greenhouse gasses. It also would help us gain greater energy independence. Wind and solar are great in many respects, but you can't dial up the wind when you need it. Also, the last time I checked, the Sun still hides behind the Earth for an average of twelve hours a day. West of the Cascades, we can go weeks without seeing our shadows outside.

I was playing in the Columbia River Gorge this past Tuesday, and from the area around the Stonehenge replica near Maryhill, Washington, I was looking at the John Day Dam on the Columbia River, several giant windmill farms, a number of solar arrays, the upper glaciers on Mount Hood (which feeds the rivers that flow into the Lower Columbia River and it's dams), and the tide-driving Moon. Not far upstream from the John Day Dam is Oregon's lone (and recently-decommissioned) coal-fired power plant and the Hanford Nuclear facility in Washington. Hanford serves as one of several symbols as to what can go wrong with nuclear. That said, every form of power has its downsides and its limitations. Just ask any neighboorhood bird what it thinks of wind and solar stations. You'll likely get a similar answer to that from a native Columbia River salmon about their feelings related to the dams and their turbines.

Rather than drone on longer about sources of eletricity, there's no denying that we're always going to need more of it, especially if our fleet of vehicles is going to be electrified. Luckily, I-84 runs along the Oregon side of the Columbia River and is home to several Electrify America stations. Thanks to addressing the gap in Wyoming, that I-84/I-80 network now stretches all the way from the West coast to NYC. That said, all of the other areas explored around here in my gas-powered cars the past two weeks would make my backside pucker with range anxiety in an EV, due of the lack of additional stations off the beaten path.

We need more zip for the trip!

I'm sure in 20 years, if I'm still around, these types of trips in my then-20-year-old (OK, maybe 19-year-old) R1T will be a piece of cake. As soon as I get it, I'm going to take the same group of friends on the same wine-tasting trip using only electricity. I'll just have to plan out the trip meticulously to keep the pucker factor to a minimum. I rolled back into my driveway at 10 p.m. with exactly 250 miles on the odometer, and that was pretty much there and back without any detours.

Cheers! :champagne:🥂🍷

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DuckTruck

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Don’t sleep on Tennessee, y’all!

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RT,

I love your State, and I love Dolly, but It's gonna take awhile to "unsee" that. Maybe next time, a video of Faith, Amy, or Sheryl?​
Your State has more musical talent per capita than pretty much any other place on the planet! Furthermore, it seems to be a magnet for people trying to escape less-friendly or decaying locales.​
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