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P.S.Mangelsdorf

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Canthoney

Canthoney

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Based on my reading of it and some other comments I’ve seen, I don’t know if this will ever be a feature. It sounds like something they can do, but it is also very risky if the conditions aren’t perfect. I’m personally OK if they don’t put the tank turn feature in, it’s a cool gimmick but obviously not very useful. I would be more interested to see if they could ever do rear wheel steering, or the crab walk like the GMC Hummer EVs or if they would require additional hardware
 

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Based on my reading of it and some other comments I’ve seen, I don’t know if this will ever be a feature. It sounds like something they can do, but it is also very risky if the conditions aren’t perfect. I’m personally OK if they don’t put the tank turn feature in, it’s a cool gimmick but obviously not very useful. I would be more interested to see if they could ever do rear wheel steering, or the crab walk like the GMC Hummer EVs or if they would require additional hardware
I can't imagine how it could function without completely different hardware in the rear.
 

sevengroove

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Based on my reading of it and some other comments I’ve seen, I don’t know if this will ever be a feature. It sounds like something they can do, but it is also very risky if the conditions aren’t perfect. I’m personally OK if they don’t put the tank turn feature in, it’s a cool gimmick but obviously not very useful. I would be more interested to see if they could ever do rear wheel steering, or the crab walk like the GMC Hummer EVs or if they would require additional hardware
I agree, rear wheel steering is far more useful especially for how large these vehicles are. I am shuddering thinking about how I'm going to tackle the mini roundabouts here on Seattle's residential streets, and fully anticipate needing a multi-point turn to navigate a few of them in the R1S.
 

Sean

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I'm in the camp for I'd love to get it but I understand the complexity and the only surprising thing is that they put out the feature in the first place without having a lot of it worked out.
 

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Based on what my focus RS will do just by varying the speed of each rear wheel… rivian’s own “drift mode” will be more than enough for hooligans purposes, and should get pretty close to zero turning radius with enough right foot 🤣
 

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Put it all together, and Tank Turn is really only easy to do in the middle of a big, flat, slippery field. Making it work anywhere else is a big challenge. The places a Tank Turn would actually be useful off-road are never level, wide-open spaces.
This is really the crux of the issue. Makes total sense to delay until they figure it out.
 

Forager1

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I agree, rear wheel steering is far more useful especially for how large these vehicles are. I am shuddering thinking about how I'm going to tackle the mini roundabouts here on Seattle's residential streets, and fully anticipate needing a multi-point turn to navigate a few of them in the R1S.
That’s easy. Here’s what I do in my Supercrew Long-bed F150: for right turns and straight pass through you go the normal way ( counter clockwise). For left turns, you get close to the intersection and verify no traffic and then go clockwise. I think the R1T wheel base is small enough it won’t be a problem, but If it is then that’s how you do it.

Edit: directionally challenged
 
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sevengroove

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That’s easy. Here’s what I do in my Supercrew Long-bed F150: for right turns and straight pass through you go the normal way (clockwise). For left turns, you get close to the intersection and verify no traffic and then go counter clockwise. I think the R1T wheel base is small enough it won’t be a problem, but If it is then that’s how you do it.
I think you might have gotten the counter/clockwise directions mixed up but yea, I think that might have to be the solution. The one thing I dislike as a pedestrian about those left turns is that it is hard to anticipate when a vehicle is about to pull one, especially if the driver is not paying attention to pedestrians. It happens very rarely in my experience, to be fair. With all vehicles meant to go in one direction, it's easier to predict how/when to cross the street.
 

Forager1

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I think you might have gotten the counter/clockwise directions mixed up but yea, I think that might have to be the solution. The one thing I dislike as a pedestrian about those left turns is that it is hard to anticipate when a vehicle is about to pull one, especially if the driver is not paying attention to pedestrians. It happens very rarely in my experience, to be fair. With all vehicles meant to go in one direction, it's easier to predict how/when to cross the street.
Gah! Yes, you are right and I’ve corrected that. I agree, it’s uncommon that peds or another vehicle approach these small residential intersections at the same time as my need to left turn. If it’s a pedestrian I wave them through (they have right of way anyway). If it’s a vehicle, you just have to bite the bullet and do a 3 point turn or mount a curb.

Regarding tank turn, I’ve wondered for a while if the issue with rolling it out wasn’t likely due to the underlying physics of making 4 wheels tank turn (which have to break static friction), versus 2 tank treads (which constantly maintain static friction). This is probably why we see K-turn being emphasized as a preferred solution —it’s more practical in real world use and in design application.
 
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