Rivian is doing itself a disservice by not publishing a charging curve

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I am new to EVs so please correct me if I am wrong but if we assume efficient is 2 miles per KE (it is something like 2.3 but rounding for simplicity) then the claim to charge 140 miles in 20 minutes would mean around 70kw (more like 65kw) in 20 minutes. That is half the battery so 10-60%in 20 minutes. Also that would equate to roughly 190kw rate during that charge period. Is this right?
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They were the one that pulled 185 yesterday, but also had their charging limit set to 100%. So it said time to charge was 1 hour and 12 minutes to finish charging from 20%. Which, as most of us no, you'll almost never do. But at the same time, most people don't know that they have it set to charge to 100%, and think it's very slow charging.

Another employee pulled 191 kw peak on a road trip from, I believe, Normal to CA. He said he thought it was pulling more than 150kw up to around 80%.

edit: I wonder if that's a 200kw charger, or a 350kw charger from EVGO.
A good question. I also need wonder if the EVGo or EA chargers share circuits like V1/2 SuperChargers do? I still pretty frequently have to explain how that works to Tesla drivers.
 
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I am new to EVs so please correct me if I am wrong but if we assume efficient is 2 miles per KE (it is something like 2.3 but rounding for simplicity) then the claim to charge 140 miles in 20 minutes would mean around 70kw (more like 65kw) in 20 minutes. That is half the battery so 10-60%in 20 minutes. Also that would equate to roughly 190kw rate during that charge period. Is this right?
Yeah, tt's about 45% of the usable battery following Rivian's numbers. Part of the question is if that's in a specific range (10-55%?), or if there's some room on what state of charge you can plug it in. For example would you also get it from 35 to 80%?

It'd be an average of about 178 kw.
 
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A good question. I also need wonder if the EVGo or EA chargers share circuits like V1/2 SuperChargers do? I still pretty frequently have to explain how that works to Tesla drivers.
EA's don't (generally). I'm not sure about the higher power EVGo chargers. Chargepoint offers a lot that do.
 

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Yeah, tt's about 45% of the usable battery following Rivian's numbers. Part of the question is if that's in a specific range (10-55%?), or if there's some room on what state of charge you can plug it in. For example would you also get it from 35 to 80%?

It'd be an average of about 178 kw.
Thanks, I agree knowing the Soc that gets the quick charge would be good to know. At least we know it charges around 190kw for a wide chunk of time.
 

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Just wanted to drop in my 2 cents. I have a reservation but won't buy unless I know what the charging curve is like. I have an older EV now, and it is great road trip car except for the slow charging curve. I just won't buy another EV that takes too long to charge to 80 or 90% as it takes too much time on trips. I also might sell my Rivian stock if the curve sucks. Once people start getting Rivians and other EVs, if they have to wait an hour for an 80% charge, they are going to be unhappy. This becomes especially important to Rivian and other CCS vehicles as there are so few fast CCS chargers (at least in the PNW). I recently counted only 14 CCS plugs on I-5 between Portland and Seattle.
 
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Just wanted to drop in my 2 cents. I have a reservation but won't buy unless I know what the charging curve is like. I have an older EV now, and it is great road trip car except for the slow charging curve. I just won't buy another EV that takes too long to charge to 80 or 90% as it takes too much time on trips. I also might sell my Rivian stock if the curve sucks. Once people start getting Rivians and other EVs, if they have to wait an hour for an 80% charge, they are going to be unhappy. This becomes especially important to Rivian and other CCS vehicles as there are so few fast CCS chargers (at least in the PNW). I recently counted only 14 CCS plugs on I-5 between Portland and Seattle.
I'd be curious how you got to that count. I view the PNW as an area that has quite a few CCS plugs (I live in the area as well), and quickly counting I get closer to 40 CCS plugs between Seattle and Portland. I'm guessing you're looking at south of Olympia, north of Portland and within like... 2 minutes of I-5?
 

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edit: I wonder if that's a 200kw charger, or a 350kw charger from EVGO.
EVGO lists that particular charger "Micaiah" as a 350kW charger, fwiw. You can look them up in the app by their names.
 

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It takes two to tango. People in this thread are forgetting the inconsistent nature of charging speeds, especially with Electrify America. One location may be pushing consistent and fast speeds, while another be very, very slow. You just never know.

For instance, this past summer tried to drive from Denver to Kansas City, and Electrify America had throttled the charging speeds in Flagler, CO, Colby, KS, Hays, KS, and Salina, KS, since those locations are super low use. The 350kW units were only pushing 35kW or 36kW. It does not matter what the charging curve of the vehicle is when the charging location is facing challenges. It does not matter what the vehicle's charging curve is if two of the charging stations are down, and the other two are being used by super slow charging Chevy Bolts.

A Rivian charging curve is a "nice to know," but there will be many other factors that affect real charging speeds. I have used 40 different Electrify America chargers in 11 states. The only consistency amongst them is that there is no consistency. This is the lesson to learn with electric vehicles, especially ones depended on Electrify America for long distance driving.

That is part of the adventure of CCS compatible EV's - the unknown. Just be prepared for all scenarios, and have a back up plan. Hell, I remember driving between Denver and Las Vegas before the Electrify America locations were open in Salina, UT and Green River, UT, and I was in a 2019 Audi e-Tron with 200 miles of range. You had to go 150 miles out of your way to use a CCS charger while heading east, and then you had to hope a slow charging Chevy Bolt was not hogging the 50kW charger in Moab on the way back. It did not matter that the e-Tron has a generous 150kW charging speed to 80%.

I am not trying to lecture, or preach, but don't be too critical of Rivian for not providing full details on charging curves since they all too well know that there are lots of factors out of their control when it comes to charging a vehicle, especially for long distance EV driving dependent on an inconsistent network like Electrify America.
 

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It takes two to tango. People in this thread are forgetting the inconsistent nature of charging speeds, especially with Electrify America. One location may be pushing consistent and fast speeds, while another be very, very slow. You just never know.

For instance, this past summer tried to drive from Denver to Kansas City, and Electrify America had throttled the charging speeds in Flagler, CO, Colby, KS, Hays, KS, and Salina, KS, since those locations are super low use. The 350kW units were only pushing 35kW or 36kW. It does not matter what the charging curve of the vehicle is when the charging location is facing challenges. It does not matter what the vehicle's charging curve is if two of the charging stations are down, and the other two are being used by super slow charging Chevy Bolts.

A Rivian charging curve is a "nice to know," but there will be many other factors that affect real charging speeds. I have used 40 different Electrify America chargers in 11 states. The only consistency amongst them is that there is no consistency. This is the lesson to learn with electric vehicles, especially ones depended on Electrify America for long distance driving.

That is part of the adventure of CCS compatible EV's - the unknown. Just be prepared for all scenarios, and have a back up plan. Hell, I remember driving between Denver and Las Vegas before the Electrify America locations were open in Salina, UT and Green River, UT, and I was in a 2019 Audi e-Tron with 200 miles of range. You had to go 150 miles out of your way to use a CCS charger while heading east, and then you had to hope a slow charging Chevy Bolt was not hogging the 50kW charger in Moab on the way back. It did not matter that the e-Tron has a generous 150kW charging speed to 80%.

I am not trying to lecture, or preach, but don't be too critical of Rivian for not providing full details on charging curves since they all too well know that there are lots of factors out of their control when it comes to charging a vehicle, especially for long distance EV driving dependent on an inconsistent network like Electrify America.
I personally don't mind Rivian not providing that info, considering the truck has been delivered since last september anyway. What I mean here is that this is the kind of info that would have been useful prior to the vehicle being delivered.

What is totally abnormal is not seeing any charge curve after 4 months from a single owner.
 

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Just wanted to drop in my 2 cents. I have a reservation but won't buy unless I know what the charging curve is like. I have an older EV now, and it is great road trip car except for the slow charging curve. I just won't buy another EV that takes too long to charge to 80 or 90% as it takes too much time on trips. I also might sell my Rivian stock if the curve sucks. Once people start getting Rivians and other EVs, if they have to wait an hour for an 80% charge, they are going to be unhappy. This becomes especially important to Rivian and other CCS vehicles as there are so few fast CCS chargers (at least in the PNW). I recently counted only 14 CCS plugs on I-5 between Portland and Seattle.
I'm in the same situation as you. My current EV definitely doesn't charge as fast as I would like, based on a lot of roadtrips and thousands of miles accumulated.

The charge curve might be a deal breaker for me as well.
 

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I'd be curious how you got to that count. I view the PNW as an area that has quite a few CCS plugs (I live in the area as well), and quickly counting I get closer to 40 CCS plugs between Seattle and Portland. I'm guessing you're looking at south of Olympia, north of Portland and within like... 2 minutes of I-5?
I'm curious as well. I think Electrify America alone has at least 20 CCS plugs between Seattle and Portland and Chargepoint has a bunch too. I worry more about going east into the mountains personally... There are 3 CSS chargers in Monore and only a couple in Leavenworth and a lot of fun places to play in between.
 

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I like Bjorns for the EQS. It's just an interesting comparison between it and a couple of other reference cars (like the E-tron GT).

Kris' is a good example of the curve for it when the battery is relatively cold as well, as he noted. I'd really like it more manufacturers started showing battery temp to the driver.

That being said, combining this with Bjorn's curve is a good example of the "standard curve." Once the battery warmed up for Kris, it's basically the same curve as what Bjorn logged. Give or take a few kw.
I must have missed Bjorn's video. But TBH, I am not following the EQS that much, because I cry myself to sleep when I see the starting price of it. I personally feel like the Lucid Air might be a better vehicle, but time will tell.
Also, I don't want to think of the repair cost associated with that Hyper Screen!
 
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EVGO lists that particular charger "Micaiah" as a 350kW charger, fwiw. You can look them up in the app by their names.
Neat! Thanks! I haven't had a chance to use an EVGO charger yet.
 
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I must have missed Bjorn's video. But TBH, I am not following the EQS that much, because I cry myself to sleep when I see the starting price of it. I personally feel like the Lucid Air might be a better vehicle, but time will tell.
Also, I don't want to think of the repair cost associated with that Hyper Screen!
lol. I doubt I'll either ever even get in an EQS or a Lucid, but I was curious to see what a the EQS would do with a big ass battery and a 400v system. And I just find it interesting to see how each manufacturer is approaching the cars.

Interestingly, I've never found a Mercedes interesting at all. The EQS is not a great looking car, but I think the interior, and from what it sounds like driving dynamics of it, are pretty neat.
 
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