Rivain R1T vs Ford Lightning F-150

Cactus

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Recent online articles from Slash Gear and Engadget cited Marques Brownlee’ evaluation of a platinum F-150. He stated and showed that the F-150 with 80% charge had 360 miles and that Ford indicated that range was calculated with 1000 pounds of extra weight.
If true, that’ s great but it shouldn’t really turn anyone from Rivian because after all, doesn’t Rivian supply the battery packs to Ford? So unless Ford is doing something different with software battery mgmt, then Rivian’s and Ford’s range be very similar? Why would Rivian allow any company for which they supply battery packs to have more range than their flagship product?

Ford’s lower frunk sill is a better design unless Rivian is thinking about front end accident repair which could include the whole hood even in a minor Front end collision on the F-150.
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thrill

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...Ford’s lower frunk sill is a better design unless Rivian is thinking about front end accident repair which could include the whole hood even in a minor Front end collision on the F-150.
I think Rivian is thinking more about 3feet wading depth.
 

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I've never heard that they supply Ford with packs. They don't even use the same company for cells. Rivian uses Samsung and Ford uses SKI
 

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Ford hasn't released the range numbers yet for the Platinum trim level. (the fine print) It's a $90K truck, certainly has a bigger battery pack then the others. Has more to do with the size of battery and not about software battery management. Just like we can upgrade our battery size.
 

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I'm just switching to the "Max Pack" hoping for 400-plus miles knowing it means getting a Rivian about this time in 2022. That or the F150 Lightning once validated performance features and EPA rating are published. Both offer appealing attributes.
 
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I had read an article over a year ago that Rivian would supply battery packs in skateboard format to Ford. If that was the plan in the rapidly evolving battery world, clearly those plans changed. Ford has partnered with SK Innovation.
https://www.motortrend.com/news/2022-ford-f-150-lightning-battery-tech-cobalt/

So why exactly did Ford invest in Rivian?
There were talks of future developments between the two companies. As far as I know, the only one stated so far was for Rivian to help make a small Lincoln branded SUV with their skateboard technology. This plan was cancelled earlier this year or at least put on hold for the time being.

Ford has always stated that the F150 would be all Ford
 

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I had read an article over a year ago that Rivian would supply battery packs in skateboard format to Ford. If that was the plan in the rapidly evolving battery world, clearly those plans changed. Ford has partnered with SK Innovation.
https://www.motortrend.com/news/2022-ford-f-150-lightning-battery-tech-cobalt/

So why exactly did Ford invest in Rivian?
Here is a Motor Trend article discussing the invstment;

https://www.motortrend.com/news/for...a's early days as an electric vehicle startup.
 

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Recent online articles from Slash Gear and Engadget cited Marques Brownlee’ evaluation of a platinum F-150. He stated and showed that the F-150 with 80% charge had 360 miles and that Ford indicated that range was calculated with 1000 pounds of extra weight.
If true, that’ s great but it shouldn’t really turn anyone from Rivian because after all, doesn’t Rivian supply the battery packs to Ford? So unless Ford is doing something different with software battery mgmt, then Rivian’s and Ford’s range be very similar? Why would Rivian allow any company for which they supply battery packs to have more range than their flagship product?

Ford’s lower frunk sill is a better design unless Rivian is thinking about front end accident repair which could include the whole hood even in a minor Front end collision on the F-150.
Ford’s is in partnership with SK for batteries. Samsung will provide Rivian’s.
 

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So why exactly did Ford invest in Rivian?
I hope not to keep them out of Texas, until after the F-150 Lightening starts production in the spring of 2022. Texas is Ford Country, and they want it to stay that way, or at least I would if it were up to me. Not good for me though, if it were to be true. I see where Rivian is most likely shipping first, which may not include some southern states, where Ford has good sales. No southern states at all, so far. Maybe there will be notice to some tomorrow.

I've seen some members here with order numbers higher than mine, that have been contacted by their guides. Congratulations to them all. However, there will be some Texans that will switch to Ford, if the F-150 Lightening becomes available to them before the Rivian.

Prove me wrong Rivian. Send some R1T Silver/Blk Mtn to Texas soon!:D
 
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Does anyone think Ford's battery tech (SK Innovations) is better than Rivian's? Rivian is so silent, that they risk losing sales.
 

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I'm just switching to the "Max Pack" hoping for 400-plus miles knowing it means getting a Rivian about this time in 2022. That or the F150 Lightning once validated performance features and EPA rating are published. Both offer appealing attributes.
That may actual be before I get my "Launch Edition". I will defiantly be on the MaxPack band wagon depending on EPA numbers. Standing pat on LE for now but this week may let us make an informed decision, or not.
 

ja_kub_sz

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Does anyone think Ford's battery tech (SK Innovations) is better than Rivian's? Rivian is so silent, that they risk losing sales.
Ford hasn't even disclosed what size battery the vehicle has, nor it's price.

As much as we know... I'd say there's more that we don't considering those are pretty big pieces of information. I just find it strange that Ford announces the range of this vehicle at it's unveiling and then they sprinkle in this new EPA estimation based on a 1,000lb load limit, which seems unusual because it's not something that we've really seen as commonplace when it comes to speculation on range of other electric vehicles.

I kind of laughed because I think to myself there was a time I took a road trip with five people in my Model S with all of our luggage, probably pretty close to a 1,000lbs. I don't really remembering any noticeable difference in my range. Maybe it's a gimmick? Who knows? I'm just very surprised how that information came about.

But again, I don't think Ford's tax credit is going to even be in existence very long due fleet/commercial sales for their base model electric truck. Your regular every day truck owner is going to have to compete for those 250k units that may be spoken for quite early on.

Probably why we're hearing all this discussion about a new $2,500 Made in America tax credit, and coupled with that a $2,500 union worker tax credit because Ford knows that they're credit won't last long and these new initiatives will definitely benefit them and keep their products favorable in the eyes of consumers looking for EV tax credits.

Ford doesn't have a made to order model that Rivian, Tesla, and other EV manufacturers are committed to. Ford builds in bulk (and has to), sells to dealers, fleets services, etc. and vehicles will sit on lots waiting for buyers. 250k trucks come and go quickly with all those potential buyers.

The lightning does have some pretty appealing qualities, but the XLT jumps the price $13,000 (53k) and that doesn't include the extended battery. Let us know how much the extended battery costs and then maybe we can start talking about how competitive the Lightning will be at its price point.

This could very well be why so many legacy auto manufacturers don't disclose their battery pack kilowatt size. All of these batteries are sourced by third-party companies and their pricing is something that is fairly consistent as far as the market goes. More so nobody is making batteries exponentially cheaper than anybody else and the battery pack being one of the greatest cost for these vehicles tells a great deal. If you know who's making the batteries, and you know the size of the pack, you can then reasonably estimate what the price and margins will be.

If Ford were to disclosed that its to pack sizes for the Lightning were 150kWh and 200kWh would their range estimates be as impressive to everyone? I feel like there's something more that we don't know yet, and that something is important.

I can say is I do love the frunk of the lightning, and it's subtle aesthetic accents that differentiated from regular F-150 while still holding true to the overall look of the brand and vehicle.

It is a very interesting vehicle, and I did love my F-150 Platinum when I had it. I can say that that was the best truck I've ever had... So far! 😎

R1T can't come soon enough!
 
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timf

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Ford doesn't have a made to order model that Rivian, Tesla, and other EV manufacturers are committed to. Ford builds in bulk (and has to), sells to dealers, fleets services, etc. and vehicles will sit on lots waiting for buyers. 250k trucks come and go quickly with all those potential buyers.
I would argue that Ford is more made to order than Tesla. Ford builds what their dealers order, and in the case of EVs they only accept customer special orders and not typical dealer stock orders. Tesla on the other hand has a very limited number of variations, and builds their cars based on general demand and not specific customer orders. When a customer places an order, they are matched with either an existing car in inventory or one coming down the production line. This is essentially a centralized inventory system, and while it creates the appearance of custom ordering, the orders do not directly drive the production schedule.

Rivian appears to be taking the same "not really built to order" approach as Tesla. This is why configuration drives priority moreso than reservation order, and why you can't mix and match seat and trim colors or add tow hooks without the reinforced underbody. The production process is designed for efficiency, and not customization. Every truck may be matched to a buyer before production starts, but the manufacturer dictates the production schedule rather than the customer.
 
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