Regen in conserve vs AP

Rtpdeacon

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Is there a difference in the amount of charge returned to the battery in regen mode vs AP? For example if you were to drive up a mountain in conserve and descend the mountain in AP, would you return more energy to the battery since you would have 4 motors generating charge?

 

odingrey

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Not sure about the actual power, but the regen feels the same. I'm pretty sure I'd be able to tell if it was halved. Rivian doesn't (yet) do brake blending, so I assume it's the same.
 

godfodder0901

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Since the rear motors are physically decoupled when in conserve, yes, you would have less regen capacity. That is, unless the truck re-engages the rear motors during regen events, which is highly unlikely.
 

Taco

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Since the rear motors are physically decoupled when in conserve, yes, you would have less regen capacity. That is, unless the truck re-engages the rear motors during regen events, which is highly unlikely.
100% agree - There are times coming off the highway that I'm like "WHOAAAA no regen!"
 

Dark-Fx

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Not sure about the actual power, but the regen feels the same. I'm pretty sure I'd be able to tell if it was halved. Rivian doesn't (yet) do brake blending, so I assume it's the same.
It's not halved but it doesn't feel quite as strong. Most of the braking power is in the front wheels of a typical vehicle anyway, so you aren't losing much.

Hard to say which mode would be more efficient at returning energy to the battery though.
 


CommodoreAmiga

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It is basically halved. The driver display even shows you this By greying out the bottom half of the regen display.
 

Rivian_Hugh_III

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It's not halved but it doesn't feel quite as strong. Most of the braking power is in the front wheels of a typical vehicle anyway, so you aren't losing much.

Hard to say which mode would be more efficient at returning energy to the battery though.
I’ve heard this said before (most braking in front) and I’ve never understood it. Not saying it’s not true, just seeking to learn why.

To me it’s akin to people saying there’s a difference in whether you push or pull a load. Why isn’t it the same?

Why don’t the front and rear brakes share the load equally?
 

Dark-Fx

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I’ve heard this said before (most braking in front) and I’ve never understood it. Not saying it’s not true, just seeking to learn why.

To me it’s akin to people saying there’s a difference in whether you push or pull a load. Why isn’t it the same?

Why don’t the front and rear brakes share the load equally?
Front tires have more weight on them under braking because it shifts forward. Forward momentum is trying to turn to angular momentum because you are stopping from the bottom side of the vehicle instead of from the middle.
 

jphillips97

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I’ve heard this said before (most braking in front) and I’ve never understood it. Not saying it’s not true, just seeking to learn why.

To me it’s akin to people saying there’s a difference in whether you push or pull a load. Why isn’t it the same?

Why don’t the front and rear brakes share the load equally?
I will offer the simple answer to help understand it and then look at the physics....

Simple analogy, remember riding your bike as a kid... Which brake felt stronger front or back?

Physics answer.... When you use brakes the vehicle weight shifts forward due to inertia. This puts more weight on the front and less on the rear. Road friction is proportional to weight (mass) and therefore so is braking power.... This is seen in all driving buy is at an extreme going downhill where your rear brakes are almost useless....
 

Rivian_Hugh_III

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Front tires have more weight on them under braking because it shifts forward. Forward momentum is trying to turn to angular momentum because you are stopping from the bottom side of the vehicle instead of from the middle.
Never thought about the angular momentum. That makes perfect sense to me. Thanks
 

 
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