DuckTruck

Well-Known Member
First Name
Duck
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
1,943
Location
PNW
First Name
Duck
Vehicles
Corvair, BMW325, Acura Legend, XC60, '16 Caddy ELR
Then I think you should drop a line to the fellows at the Earth Rotation Service and tell them how much you appreciate what they do.
I did, but their answering service said they'd have to get back to me......in 24 hours.





Advertisement

 

ajdelange

Well-Known Member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
1,595
Reaction score
1,052
Location
Virginia/Quebec
First Name
A. J.
Vehicles
Tesla X Extended Range Plus 2019, Lexus, Landcruiser, SR5
Occupation
EE Retired
Apparent or siderial?
 

DuckTruck

Well-Known Member
First Name
Duck
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
1,943
Location
PNW
First Name
Duck
Vehicles
Corvair, BMW325, Acura Legend, XC60, '16 Caddy ELR
Unsurprisingly enough there is a trade association of convenience store owners and unsurprisingly enough they publish a magazine. A couple of years back that magazine had a long article about the benefits of adding charging at your store. The obvious one is that while the cars are charging the owners are inside buying. This is basically the model used with petrol at places like Cumberland Farms, Checkrite, WaWa..... today. There is already quite a bit of charging at convenience stores (Sheetz, WaWa, Checkrite....). I think we are going to expect to have to pay. While it is evidently true that the convenience stores make more money inside than they do at the pumps they still charge for gas. It isn't free to them no more will be electricity.


I don't but can only guess that they will do it the same way that Tesla does. Tesla maintains location and status information in a data base at the mother ship and sends info on the relevant stations to the car over the cell phone network. Real time info is then presented to the driver on the navigation display.

Start playing with it now so that you will be familiar with it when the truck arrives. It's very useful for newbies in learning what the capabilities of their new BEV will be.

In particular understand that the most important input to it is the consumption rate (Wh/mi or Wh/km). The main driver of it's "accuracy" is that number. As you drive your truck you will, if you are at all nerdy, learn to focus on that number and how it varies under various driving conditions. The vehicle will probably present it to you in various ways. Your personal driving style influences it a lot. Once you have a handle on what that number is for you you can put that into ABRP (or any other planning program) and get more "accurate" plans. OTOH, as was observed, the defaults ABRP uses seem to be pretty conservative and you can just run with that and still get a pretty good idea as to what you will experience on the road.
AJ,

Thanks for the education you've provided all along this path. When I drive my ELR, I watch and experiment with the usage rate, but with gasoline backup for when the battery is done, it's been a bit of a hobby. Once the R1T arrives, it'll be a critical function. I'll be watching that Wh/mi data and matching it to my driving style and habits closely to allow for the best results and outcomes.

I wish everyone great fun blowing things up this evening. I just hope those Teslas don't become part of the fireworks displays....
 

DuckTruck

Well-Known Member
First Name
Duck
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
1,943
Location
PNW
First Name
Duck
Vehicles
Corvair, BMW325, Acura Legend, XC60, '16 Caddy ELR
Last edited:

ajdelange

Well-Known Member
First Name
A. J.
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
1,595
Reaction score
1,052
Location
Virginia/Quebec
First Name
A. J.
Vehicles
Tesla X Extended Range Plus 2019, Lexus, Landcruiser, SR5
Occupation
EE Retired
That looks familiar. Old Town Square in Prague?
 

SteveInBend

Member
First Name
Steve
Joined
Oct 21, 2020
Messages
16
Reaction score
36
Location
Bend, Oregon
First Name
Steve
Vehicles
2015 Subaru Outback
Occupation
Retired
Adding to the Painted Hills/John Day River discussion. Took this photo along the John Day River north of the Painted Hills in October 2019. Gravel bike ride from Ashwood to Mitchell. About 50 miles. Half the group rode from Ashwood to Mitchell, the other half in the opposite direction. Did a car key swap in the middle.

JohnDayRiver_scaled.jpg
 

DuckTruck

Well-Known Member
First Name
Duck
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
1,943
Location
PNW
First Name
Duck
Vehicles
Corvair, BMW325, Acura Legend, XC60, '16 Caddy ELR
Adding to the Painted Hills/John Day River discussion. Took this photo along the John Day River north of the Painted Hills in October 2019. Gravel bike ride from Ashwood to Mitchell. About 50 miles. Half the group rode from Ashwood to Mitchell, the other half in the opposite direction. Did a car key swap in the middle.

JohnDayRiver_scaled.jpg
That sounds like the perfect time of year to visit the area. Still great weather, fewer people, and beautiful nights, to boot. Do you recall seeing much in the way of wildlife at that time? I've heard the birding can be great there at times. I just haven't researched when it's best for watching.
 

SteveInBend

Member
First Name
Steve
Joined
Oct 21, 2020
Messages
16
Reaction score
36
Location
Bend, Oregon
First Name
Steve
Vehicles
2015 Subaru Outback
Occupation
Retired
That sounds like the perfect time of year to visit the area. Still great weather, fewer people, and beautiful nights, to boot. Do you recall seeing much in the way of wildlife at that time? I've heard the birding can be great there at times. I just haven't researched when it's best for watching.
I don't recall much in the way of wildlife. Not a birder myself. Were probably a few hawks. But there were lots of goathead thorns in one section, for sure!
 

DuckTruck

Well-Known Member
First Name
Duck
Joined
Dec 23, 2020
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
1,943
Location
PNW
First Name
Duck
Vehicles
Corvair, BMW325, Acura Legend, XC60, '16 Caddy ELR
I used to travel the gravel there and thought those areas were devoid of wildlife. Then, I went birding there with friends who make the trip once a year, and now I see birds everywhere. Some birds of prey, but little ones all over the place. I just never saw them before. Makes the area feel more alive.
 

JeremyMKE

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jeremy
Joined
Sep 15, 2020
Messages
237
Reaction score
510
Location
Milwaukee, WI
First Name
Jeremy
Vehicles
E39 M5, Toyota Sienna, 2001 Yamaha Scooter
Occupation
Riviot

GHuff

Member
First Name
John
Joined
Feb 25, 2021
Messages
16
Reaction score
16
Location
Dallas
First Name
John
Vehicles
Tahoe / Jeep Wrangler
The lack of Texas location is mind boggling to me. 1 out of 10 Americans live in Texas. It is the second most populated state in the entire country. And most of this population is in 5 cities: Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin. It wouldn't be hard to hit these 5 cities hard.
-One location in San Antonio (7th largest city in US)
- 3 locations in Houston (4th largest city in US)
- 2 locations in Austin (11th largest city in US)
- 3 locations in Dallas (9th largest city in US)
- 1 location in Fort Worth (13th largest city in US)
Yes, Texas may not be what you would call an early adopter of EVs. But ignoring the Texas market is bad business. It's a numbers game. I would also bet that Texas market makes up a large percentage of Tesla sales (and Cybertruck pre-orders and Lightning Pre-orders).

On top of that, Texas is the king of SUVs, and pick up trucks. What does Rivian make? Oh, just a large SUV and a Pick Up Truck.
 
OP
OP
A

Autolycus

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 2, 2021
Messages
230
Reaction score
339
Location
ATL
Vehicles
ICE only :(
The lack of Texas location is mind boggling to me. 1 out of 10 Americans live in Texas. It is the second most populated state in the entire country. And most of this population is in 5 cities: Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin. It wouldn't be hard to hit these 5 cities hard.
-One location in San Antonio (7th largest city in US)
- 3 locations in Houston (4th largest city in US)
- 2 locations in Austin (11th largest city in US)
- 3 locations in Dallas (9th largest city in US)
- 1 location in Fort Worth (13th largest city in US)
Yes, Texas may not be what you would call an early adopter of EVs. But ignoring the Texas market is bad business. It's a numbers game. I would also bet that Texas market makes up a large percentage of Tesla sales (and Cybertruck pre-orders and Lightning Pre-orders).

On top of that, Texas is the king of SUVs, and pick up trucks. What does Rivian make? Oh, just a large SUV and a Pick Up Truck.
Most charging for intra-city driving is done at home. Rivian doesn’t need a RAN fast charger in every neighborhood. They need them in places that people need to charge: along major highway routes and in areas where people want to do outdoor recreation that’s not covered by other charging networks. The map of TX looks like it does a pretty good job of covering the major highway routes, especially between the big metro areas.
 

SeaGeo

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brice
Joined
Jan 12, 2021
Messages
669
Reaction score
1,052
Location
Seattle
First Name
Brice
Vehicles
Xc60 T8
Occupation
Engineer
Most charging for intra-city driving is done at home. Rivian doesn’t need a RAN fast charger in every neighborhood. They need them in places that people need to charge: along major highway routes and in areas where people want to do outdoor recreation that’s not covered by other charging networks. The map of TX looks like it does a pretty good job of covering the major highway routes, especially between the big metro areas.
And since everyone apparently in a mansion in Texas, charging at home should be easy compared to cities where people live primarily in apartments. 😁
 

Advertisement





 


Advertisement
Top