Sponsored

macb00kemdanno

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brandon
Joined
Feb 19, 2024
Threads
1
Messages
49
Reaction score
94
Location
Garner, NC
Vehicles
2021 Tesla Model 3 SR+. 2023 Tesla Model Y LR
I know, we don't agree. That is OK.

But just to explain a little more - all refueling stops are inconvenient. Unless you can refuel without any extra effort, which may come with inductive charging, it will always be something unproductive and inconvenient. Yes, 5-10 minutes of inconvenience is better than 30, but that doesn't change the fact that we refuel because we have not, not because we want to.

I want my refueling stops to be as few as possible, and as convenient as possible. If I am forced to stop every 200 miles, it will be VERY inconvenient. If I can refuel when it coincides with another planned stop, then the inconvenience factor is reduced substantially. Longer range cars improve flexibility and reduce the inconvenience of a refueling stop.

My wife's Jeep GC-L can easily go 500 miles on the highway between refueling stops. We drove it down to the OBX last week, drove it all round there to various restaurants, and home. We never had to stop once to refuel. In fact, it still has a quarter of a tank of gas remaining. I have taken my Mach-e and I am forced to charge while there. I have a 240V outlet at the house so that makes it easier, but it is still a hassle. A hassle my wife has no desire to deal with.

Personally I hate refueling. The inconvenience to me is very annoying, so I am willing to pay more for a longer range vehicle. I will pay for big ass battery, and you can pick the model with the smallest battery, and we both will be happy.
I get what you're saying; it just seems edge-case to what Rivian is trying to achieve. The average American worker commutes 15 to 20 miles one way, not 143 miles. The R2 is being aimed at the heart of the market, not outliers.

To your point about paying for a “bigass” battery while I get the small one. Remember, the R2 is all about reducing costs to appeal to more mainstream buyers. Cutting costs is a big part of everything Rivian is doing at the moment to survive as an automaker. Putting an expensive 400- to 500-mile battery pack in an R2 makes no economic sense for Rivian, even though it may satisfy edge-case users. Rivian will gladly sell you an R1T or R1S Max Pack with 400+ miles of EPA range if you want range.

I understand your frustration about charging times, but I guess it depends on the frequency of the “inconvenience.” My Model 3 has a 263-mile EPA range. 99% of the time, I charge it at home. I mainly drive around town and, at most, to my parents’ house, which is 80 miles away. So I can easily get away without needing to Supercharge on the way to visit them in my car. I’ve put 43,000 miles on the car in less than three years, mainly driving within the state, taking the kids to school, running errands, etc. I work from home, so a work commute doesn’t factor into the equation.

We drove from our home in Garner, NC down to my in-laws’ beach house at Holden Beach for Easter weekend. I charged my wife's Model Y to 90 percent at home, and then we drove the 150 miles down here to Holden, doing 80 mph most of the way along I-40. We arrived with a 28 percent charge and plugged it in Friday night into the NEMA 14-50 that I had installed here two years ago. That was the epitome of convenience for us. If we didn't have the 14-150 charger here, we'd just hit up the Supercharger in Leland on the way out for about 5 minutes to get enough charge to make it home.

When I travel out of state in my Model 3, it’s from central NC to Baltimore, MD for an occasional Orioles game and to see extended family. That’s maybe twice a year. I usually make two stops during the 350-mile trip up there -- once in Petersburg, VA to charge for 20 minutes and grab a bite to eat/bathroom break and again for about 15 minutes closer to DC. I'm in my mid-40s, and my bladder doesn't last as long as it did when I was in my 20s and 30s, so I welcome the stops :)

I will add that a lot of my opinion about range, charging times, and charger availability is formed by the Tesla Supercharger network for long-distance travel (which is vast and reliable). If it had to deal with the crapfest that is Electrify America or some of the other shoddy setups that I've seen, it'd probably be a different torry.

So, yes, we don't agree. And yes, I get your desire for more range. But the R2 is not the vehicle to satisfy that need, and it was never designed to be.

The end goal of BEVs is not to burden vehicles with 150 to 200 kWh battery packs. The end goal is to make charger availability as ubiquitous as gas stations (with similar fillup times) and to make batteries lighter, more powerful, more efficient, and less expensive.
Sponsored

 

mkhuffman

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mike
Joined
Nov 9, 2020
Threads
0
Messages
428
Reaction score
532
Location
Virginia
Vehicles
Ford Mach-E GT, Jeep GC-L, VW Jetta
I get what you're saying; it just seems edge-case to what Rivian is trying to achieve. The average American worker commutes 15 to 20 miles one way, not 143 miles. The R2 is being aimed at the heart of the market, not outliers.

To your point about paying for a “bigass” battery while I get the small one. Remember, the R2 is all about reducing costs to appeal to more mainstream buyers. Cutting costs is a big part of everything Rivian is doing at the moment to survive as an automaker. Putting an expensive 400- to 500-mile battery pack in an R2 makes no economic sense for Rivian, even though it may satisfy edge-case users. Rivian will gladly sell you an R1T or R1S Max Pack with 400+ miles of EPA range if you want range.

I understand your frustration about charging times, but I guess it depends on the frequency of the “inconvenience.” My Model 3 has a 263-mile EPA range. 99% of the time, I charge it at home. I mainly drive around town and, at most, to my parents’ house, which is 80 miles away. So I can easily get away without needing to Supercharge on the way to visit them in my car. I’ve put 43,000 miles on the car in less than three years, mainly driving within the state, taking the kids to school, running errands, etc. I work from home, so a work commute doesn’t factor into the equation.

We drove from our home in Garner, NC down to my in-laws’ beach house at Holden Beach for Easter weekend. I charged my wife's Model Y to 90 percent at home, and then we drove the 150 miles down here to Holden, doing 80 mph most of the way along I-40. We arrived with a 28 percent charge and plugged it in Friday night into the NEMA 14-50 that I had installed here two years ago. That was the epitome of convenience for us. If we didn't have the 14-150 charger here, we'd just hit up the Supercharger in Leland on the way out for about 5 minutes to get enough charge to make it home.

When I travel out of state in my Model 3, it’s from central NC to Baltimore, MD for an occasional Orioles game and to see extended family. That’s maybe twice a year. I usually make two stops during the 350-mile trip up there -- once in Petersburg, VA to charge for 20 minutes and grab a bite to eat/bathroom break and again for about 15 minutes closer to DC. I'm in my mid-40s, and my bladder doesn't last as long as it did when I was in my 20s and 30s, so I welcome the stops :)

I will add that a lot of my opinion about range, charging times, and charger availability is formed by the Tesla Supercharger network for long-distance travel (which is vast and reliable). If it had to deal with the crapfest that is Electrify America or some of the other shoddy setups that I've seen, it'd probably be a different torry.

So, yes, we don't agree. And yes, I get your desire for more range. But the R2 is not the vehicle to satisfy that need, and it was never designed to be.

The end goal of BEVs is not to burden vehicles with 150 to 200 kWh battery packs. The end goal is to make charger availability as ubiquitous as gas stations (with similar fillup times) and to make batteries lighter, more powerful, more efficient, and less expensive.
I want Rivian to survive, and I agree they need to keep very tight control of the cost of the R2. So I don't expect them to offer a long range version like what I really want. Eventually, though, I think it will be cost effective to increase the size of the batteries so that longer range is possible. Like the R1, as you mentioned. Although for me the final max pack usable capacity was a huge letdown. I was really hoping for 180 kWh.
 

Gen(R3)Xer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2024
Threads
3
Messages
187
Reaction score
128
Location
Ohio
Vehicles
Honda Fit
Rivian R2 Specs leaked via website source code!!!

- Starting price $47,500
- Range up to 330 miles
- 0 to 60 in 3 seconds
- Seats 5
- Length 185.6 in
- Width 75 in
- Width with Mirrors 84.4 in
- Height 66.9 in
- Max Ground Clearance 9.8 in
- Wheelbase 115.6 in
- Wheel and Tire Diameter 32
- Approach Angle 25°
- Departure Angle 27°







Source Code:

GH4JDkJWUAAX5lo.jpeg
What happened to the $45K starting price? Is this the dual motor? Now I just need to know how fast the vehicle charges and what the charging curve looks like.
 

godfodder0901

Well-Known Member
First Name
Jared
Joined
Mar 12, 2019
Threads
24
Messages
3,390
Reaction score
6,404
Location
Washington
Vehicles
2004 Honda Civic EX, 2022 Rivian R1T LE
What happened to the $45K starting price? Is this the dual motor? Now I just need to know how fast the vehicle charges and what the charging curve looks like.
Still there. This post was from a leaked page before the reveal. Start of the lowest optioned R2 will be $45,000.
 

Sponsored

Gen(R3)Xer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2024
Threads
3
Messages
187
Reaction score
128
Location
Ohio
Vehicles
Honda Fit
If true I think people will be happy with those specs.
Even better if it qualifies for the full EV tax credit. Then you’re looking at a $40K crossover EUV. I can’t remember the exact saying, but if a vehicle drops by $5,000, X% more people can afford to buy it. Sorry I can’t remember the exact percentage. All I know is that Rivian has a winner on its hands, if it can get it ramped up and out the door.
 

Gen(R3)Xer

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2024
Threads
3
Messages
187
Reaction score
128
Location
Ohio
Vehicles
Honda Fit
Still there. This post was from a leaked page before the reveal. Start of the lowest optioned R2 will be $45,000.
Ah, I see. So Rivian wanted to surprise people who already analyzed the page. Plus they showed off two fantastic concept vehicles as well. I hope they all come to fruition.
Sponsored

 
 




Top