BigE

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Having now heard horror stories about driving the R1T in snow, and how we need dedicated snow tires on this amazing truck…it’s been a head scratcher for me. Here’s some rational thought from a guy in Minnesota. Having myself grown up in Wisconsin and learning to drive rear wheel drive cars, some with bias ply tires back in the day. In comparison , the Rivian R1T on any set of OEM tires should handle amazing.


 

COdogman

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Thanks for putting that video together! That will help many people.

I think most of us that are concerned about it live in places with some steeper roads and the real worry is going downhill on ice and trying to stop or take a corner. I know in MN you get the ice part (I've visited in February🥶), but in the mountains here we get snow storm after snow storm and the plows and traffic going over that packed snow every day turn it into packed ice that is like concrete and stays that way until spring. When that happens on a hill it gets very sketchy very quick if you even tap your brakes in the wrong spot.

Most of us are used to handling that in an ICE vehicle, but the measures you take in an ICE truck are not the same as an EV with pretty strong regen braking as soon as you slightly lift off the accelerator. That alone is enough to send the truck sliding on some steep roads. I don't have my truck yet but most feel like being able to adjust or turn off the regen braking would probably do the trick, allowing for the same tactics we would use in an ICE vehicle on ice.
 
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windblowlc

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Thanks for putting that video together! That will help many people.

I think most of us that are concerned about it live in places with some steeper roads and the real worry is going downhill on ice and trying to stop or take a corner. I know in MN you get the ice part (I've visited in February🥶), but in the mountains here we get snow storm after snow storm and the plows and traffic going over that packed snow every day turn it into packed ice that is like concrete and stays that way until spring. When that happens on a hill it gets very sketchy very quick if you even tap your brakes in the wrong spot.

Most of us are used to handling that in an ICE vehicle, but the measures you take in an ICE truck are not the same as an EV with pretty strong regen braking as soon as you slightly lift off the accelerator. That alone is enough to send the truck sliding on some steep roads. I don't have my truck yet but most feel like being able to adjust or turn off the region braking would probably do the trick, allowing for the same tactics we would use in an ICE vehicle on ice.
I cannot phrase it any better!
 

cbrcanuck

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Having now heard horror stories about driving the R1T in snow, and how we need dedicated snow tires on this amazing truck…it’s been a head scratcher for me. Here’s some rational thought from a guy in Minnesota. Having myself grown up in Wisconsin and learning to drive rear wheel drive cars, some with bias ply tires back in the day. In comparison , the Rivian R1T on any set of OEM tires should handle amazing.

While I only watched the first few mins and maybe you switched gears and addressed this, but....

...with all due respect, driving in "your" snowy conditions and driving in Pac NW snowy conditions are VERY different. I'm originally from Winnipeg (north of WI for those geographically questioning) and driving in that kind of snow, and on that flat of terrain is very easy. All season tires are fine. However, driving in the WET snow in the MOUNTAINS on the coast is a completely different animal. Every year I couldn't tell you how many vehicles of all shapes, sizes, engine types, 2WD, 4WD, AWD, ICE, EV, etc with all season tires slide off the road, into other cars, through intersections, etc. I have met many self-appointed expert flatlander snow drivers who get a rude awakening when they're sliding through an intersection into oncoming traffic in Vancouver snow.
 

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Most of us are used to handling that in an ICE vehicle, but the measures you take in an ICE truck are not the same as an EV with pretty strong regen braking as soon as you slightly lift off the accelerator. That alone is enough to send the truck sliding on some steep roads. I don't have my truck yet but most feel like being able to adjust or turn off the regen braking would probably do the trick, allowing for the same tactics we would use in an ICE vehicle on ice.
Nailed it!
 


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OP

BigE

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While I only watched the first few mins and maybe you switched gears and addressed this, but....

...with all due respect, driving in "your" snowy conditions and driving in Pac NW snowy conditions are VERY different. I'm originally from Winnipeg (north of WI for those geographically questioning) and driving in that kind of snow, and on that flat of terrain is very easy. All season tires are fine. However, driving in the WET snow in the MOUNTAINS on the coast is a completely different animal. Every year I couldn't tell you how many vehicles of all shapes, sizes, engine types, 2WD, 4WD, AWD, ICE, EV, etc with all season tires slide off the road, into other cars, through intersections, etc. I have met many self-appointed expert flatlander snow drivers who get a rude awakening when they're sliding through an intersection into oncoming traffic in Vancouver snow.
While I only watched the first few mins and maybe you switched gears and addressed this, but....

...with all due respect, driving in "your" snowy conditions and driving in Pac NW snowy conditions are VERY different. I'm originally from Winnipeg (north of WI for those geographically questioning) and driving in that kind of snow, and on that flat of terrain is very easy. All season tires are fine. However, driving in the WET snow in the MOUNTAINS on the coast is a completely different animal. Every year I couldn't tell you how many vehicles of all shapes, sizes, engine types, 2WD, 4WD, AWD, ICE, EV, etc with all season tires slide off the road, into other cars, through intersections, etc. I have met many self-appointed expert flatlander snow drivers who get a rude awakening when they're sliding through an intersection into oncoming traffic in Vancouver snow.
Not my video. I just shared it.
 

MountainBikeDude

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While I only watched the first few mins and maybe you switched gears and addressed this, but....

...with all due respect, driving in "your" snowy conditions and driving in Pac NW snowy conditions are VERY different. I'm originally from Winnipeg (north of WI for those geographically questioning) and driving in that kind of snow, and on that flat of terrain is very easy. All season tires are fine. However, driving in the WET snow in the MOUNTAINS on the coast is a completely different animal. Every year I couldn't tell you how many vehicles of all shapes, sizes, engine types, 2WD, 4WD, AWD, ICE, EV, etc with all season tires slide off the road, into other cars, through intersections, etc. I have met many self-appointed expert flatlander snow drivers who get a rude awakening when they're sliding through an intersection into oncoming traffic in Vancouver snow.
Amen Reverend!
 

NWCamper

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While I only watched the first few mins and maybe you switched gears and addressed this, but....

...with all due respect, driving in "your" snowy conditions and driving in Pac NW snowy conditions are VERY different. I'm originally from Winnipeg (north of WI for those geographically questioning) and driving in that kind of snow, and on that flat of terrain is very easy. All season tires are fine. However, driving in the WET snow in the MOUNTAINS on the coast is a completely different animal. Every year I couldn't tell you how many vehicles of all shapes, sizes, engine types, 2WD, 4WD, AWD, ICE, EV, etc with all season tires slide off the road, into other cars, through intersections, etc. I have met many self-appointed expert flatlander snow drivers who get a rude awakening when they're sliding through an intersection into oncoming traffic in Vancouver snow.
Wet vs Dry snow
 

Mathme

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I've lived in the Seattle area, Illinois, Nebraska, and Northern California and driven lots on snowy roads. I agree with posters above in that areas with hills are a different beast to drive in than the flatter states. Everyone has a different style of snow/ice to contend with.

In Northern CA, I'e driven ICE vehicles on both dedicated winter tires and all seasons over 7500 foot mountain passes. From my experience, you can get by in NoCal with M+S all seasons as if the roads are worse than what these tires can handle, they close. The challenge becomes once you are off the plowed roads in the city...tis easy to get stuck.

Like everything in life, there are trade-offs. For me, I'm leaning toward the 20s as they will be better in the snow and ice than the All Seasons.
 


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Nailed it!
My issue is mountain driving. We live in Colorado, and ski frequently, and sometimes get into some pretty hairy conditions coming over mountain passes or driving in the mountains. My issue is not the snow or the ice - its the downhill grade on snow/ice in a 7,000 pound vehicle that concerns me!
 

SeaGeo

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I've lived in the Seattle area, Illinois, Nebraska, and Northern California and driven lots on snowy roads. I agree with posters above in that areas with hills are a different beast to drive in than the flatter states. Everyone has a different style of snow/ice to contend with.
Yep.

Case in point, I literally didn't know anyone (and still don't) who puts winter tires on in South Dakota or Minnesota. Everyone I knew in school and all of my family just run with all seasons. Generally speaking the roads are straight, well maintain (usually...) and if you go off the road it's into a snow fill shallow ditch.

Meanwhile winter tires (and studs) are much more common out west for the reasons folks have discussed.
 

DTown3011

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Yep.

Case in point, I literally didn't know anyone (and still don't) who puts winter tires on in South Dakota or Minnesota. Everyone I knew in school and all of my family just run with all seasons. Generally speaking the roads are straight, well maintain (usually...) and if you go off the road it's into a snow fill shallow ditch.

Meanwhile winter tires (and studs) are much more common out west for the reasons folks have discussed.
I grew up in Michigan and never once put on nor thought about winter tires.

Living in Colorado for 15+ years, and spending time in the mountains, driving through the stuff that I do I can't imagine living without them!
 

crashmtb

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While I only watched the first few mins and maybe you switched gears and addressed this, but....

...with all due respect, driving in "your" snowy conditions and driving in Pac NW snowy conditions are VERY different. I'm originally from Winnipeg (north of WI for those geographically questioning) and driving in that kind of snow, and on that flat of terrain is very easy. All season tires are fine. However, driving in the WET snow in the MOUNTAINS on the coast is a completely different animal. Every year I couldn't tell you how many vehicles of all shapes, sizes, engine types, 2WD, 4WD, AWD, ICE, EV, etc with all season tires slide off the road, into other cars, through intersections, etc. I have met many self-appointed expert flatlander snow drivers who get a rude awakening when they're sliding through an intersection into oncoming traffic in Vancouver snow.
You should probably look at the latest maps 😉

all season tires are uselss in any appreciably wintry conditions. I’ve had the fun experience of crabbing down the highway, being blown sideways in an early November storm due to an unscheduled trip the day before winter tires were going on.

Iin fairness, snow in Vancouver catches out most Vancouver drivers, nevermind smug “you don’t know winter” prairie transplants.

my favourite winter drive is hwy 3, specifically salmo-creston, when it’s enough of a mess that the truckers are all resigned to the shoulder And out of the way.

PS it’s west coast style snow here this week. Like driving on goose poop. worse in the morning since it’s been near or above freezing in the daytime, but cold enough at night to freeze the mush solid.

Yep.

Case in point, I literally didn't know anyone (and still don't) who puts winter tires on in South Dakota or Minnesota. Everyone I knew in school and all of my family just run with all seasons. Generally speaking the roads are straight, well maintain (usually...) and if you go off the road it's into a snow fill shallow ditch.

Meanwhile winter tires (and studs) are much more common out west for the reasons folks have discussed.
is this why every driver I encountered this time last year on 29 southbound was doing 40mph at best, white knuckling it with their hazards on(a new one for me) just because of a little blowing snow?!
 

dleewla

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Thanks for putting that video together! That will help many people.

I think most of us that are concerned about it live in places with some steeper roads and the real worry is going downhill on ice and trying to stop or take a corner. I know in MN you get the ice part (I've visited in February🥶), but in the mountains here we get snow storm after snow storm and the plows and traffic going over that packed snow every day turn it into packed ice that is like concrete and stays that way until spring. When that happens on a hill it gets very sketchy very quick if you even tap your brakes in the wrong spot.

Most of us are used to handling that in an ICE vehicle, but the measures you take in an ICE truck are not the same as an EV with pretty strong regen braking as soon as you slightly lift off the accelerator. That alone is enough to send the truck sliding on some steep roads. I don't have my truck yet but most feel like being able to adjust or turn off the regen braking would probably do the trick, allowing for the same tactics we would use in an ICE vehicle on ice.
excellent points

in addition, i think a potential multiplier is that a bunch of people who are buying these vehicles have little to no experience in snow and ice conditions. think of all the Californians buying these and barely ever drive in snow. even us in PNW, if you live in King county, you dont drive in a lot of snow. its these same people taking these vehicles to explore places where the conditions are not going to be what they are used to. on top of that its an EV with regen braking, which a lot of people are not used to (and downhill in snow... yikes). on top of that, theres a ton of instant torque, which a lot of people are not used to. on top of that the R1T is probably twice the weight of any vehicle they have previously owned. sure the weight might help grip but if it slides, it also makes the slide worse.

so just something to be aware of and be vary cautious if you are new to EVs and new to snow/ice.
 

 
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