Lucid Motors SUV

Hmp10

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Lucid Motors has just hinted that its September 9 reveal of the production version of its Lucid Air sedan will also include a preview of the working prototype of a full-size SUV built on the same platform.

Lucid has said for some time that the second vehicle in its 10-year product plan would be an SUV, but no one had expected it to be this far along in development at this point.

https://insideevs.com/news/438819/lucid-motors-electric-suv-prototype/

Does it look familiar . . . ?

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That’s a Range Rover lol. So close to that.
 

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I've been very impressed with what I've seen from Lucid. I have no doubt it will be an impressive SUV technically & aesthetically, but still think Rivian is more my style.
 
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My guess is that this SUV is aimed more at the MB GL, BMW X7, and Range Rover crowd than the R1S, which will be better suited for off-roading and other heavy-duty service.

Although I have a deposit on a Lucid Air Dream Edition (the launch model) and am confident this will be a nice SUV, I'm still keeping my R1S reservation in case I decide to add an electric SUV to the stable.
 

Jehorton

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My guess is that this SUV is aimed more at the MB GL, BMW X7, and Range Rover crowd than the R1S, which will be better suited for off-roading and other heavy-duty service.

Although I have a deposit on a Lucid Air Dream Edition (the launch model) and am confident this will be a nice SUV, I'm still keeping my R1S reservation in case I decide to add an electric SUV to the stable.
What is their asking price for these vehicles?
 
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Hmp10

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What is their asking price for these vehicles?
No idea about the SUV, other than it'll probably be expensive. The sedan on which it is based will likely range from just over $60k to upwards of $150k, depending on number of motors (1, 2, or 3), battery pack sizes, and some very pricey options.
 

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The Lucid Air is a beautiful car. However for an suv or rally car as a second to the future R1T in our family, it seems Rivian is a better match for our lifestyle.
 
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Hmp10

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I'm a huge Lucid fan. People forget that it was Peter Rawlinson (Lucid CEO and CTO) -- not Elon Musk -- who actually engineered the original Model S, using the cutting-edge technology of that era. The car won the Car of the Year in 2012 and showed the world what EVs could be.

I see no reason why, ten years later, he cannot do the same thing again. Everything so far released about the car -- its aerodynamics, its ADAS system, and now its range -- confirm he's on the path to succeed. Yet the internet boards are full of Tesla fanboys deriding everything about Lucid. It all smacks of unleashed panic.

All that being said, I'm keeping my Rivian R1S reservation.

I think Tesla, Lucid, and Rivian are at the forefront of EVs -- each in a different market space -- and have the best chances of the non-legacy manufacturers to remain there. I want to drive all three before I bow off the stage.
 

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I'm a huge Lucid fan. People forget that it was Peter Rawlinson (Lucid CEO and CTO) -- not Elon Musk -- who actually engineered the original Model S, using the cutting-edge technology of that era. The car won the Car of the Year in 2012 and showed the world what EVs could be.

I see no reason why, ten years later, he cannot do the same thing again. Everything so far released about the car -- its aerodynamics, its ADAS system, and now its range -- confirm he's on the path to succeed. Yet the internet boards are full of Tesla fanboys deriding everything about Lucid. It all smacks of unleashed panic.

All that being said, I'm keeping my Rivian R1S reservation.

I think Tesla, Lucid, and Rivian are at the forefront of EVs -- each in a different market space -- and have the best chances of the non-legacy manufacturers to remain there. I want to drive all three before I bow off the stage.
Its really bad when I'm trying to learn more about EVs from different EV owners, but all the replies are from fan boys... i understand the panic you mentioned since this will be my first and there is tons of misinformation.
 
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Hmp10

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I've had a Tesla Model S P90D since 2015. My brother, who pores over every tidbit of EV information available, has a 2018 Model 3. I've schooled myself in everything I can find about the Lucid Air.

I'm neither a Tesla fanboy nor a Tesla hater. It's just one of many high-performance cars I've owned over the years. I have a very dim understanding of some of the technical information that is out there. However, if you can live with a layman's perspective from an EV owner, I'd be glad to give you my opinion on any particular issue you're exploring.
 

Babbuino

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I've had a Tesla Model S P90D since 2015. My brother, who pores over every tidbit of EV information available, has a 2018 Model 3. I've schooled myself in everything I can find about the Lucid Air.

I'm neither a Tesla fanboy nor a Tesla hater. It's just one of many high-performance cars I've owned over the years. I have a very dim understanding of some of the technical information that is out there. However, if you can live with a layman's perspective from an EV owner, I'd be glad to answer any questions you have.
Thanks that would be awesome.
First charging. Do I need to install any specific plug for an ev or a regular dryer outlet works, and how much of an increase you see in your electric bill [ just for reference since prices vary]
Can it be charged from a generator?
Do the car companies usually give the adaptors or do you usually need to buy them separate? [ ccs, tesla, 110v, 220v]
Since these wont be used with the Tesla sc network, which companies offer super charging, im guessing i would need to have an account with each.
Have you used a better route planner? Been playing with it, but sometimes it sends me through a longer route, but it says that the driving time is reduced[ i dont think it can calculate traffic]
Range wise, for tesla for example, if the epa says 300miles, how accurate is it? Mainly in the highway only. Not worried about city. I think epa does the highway at 60mph which is prob too slow.
For rivian specifically would be the range off road since the batteries are larger and there wouldnt be drag, but the motors are working harder. Prob cant answer this one, but an opinion would be welcome too :D
 

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First charging. Do I need to install any specific plug for an ev or a regular dryer outlet works,
For practical charging rates most install a 50A outlet or permanently wire in a 60A "charger" obtainable from many sources (search EVSE on Amazon).

...and how much of an increase you see in your electric bill [ just for reference since prices vary]
As prices vary I will just note that in the winter time the car accounts for 5.8% of my electric consumption and in the summer 6.8%. But note that with COVID my driving is down quite a bit.


Can it be charged from a generator?
Yes but most people don't do that as it costs way more to do it than to charge it from the line. If your power goes down for a week and you need to get out you can, of course, charge from your house backup generator but need to realize that the truck will draw as much as 11.5 kW which may overload the generator. So you would need to reduce the charge rate. Tesla recommends that you do not charge from a 'privately owned' generator. There are considerations with small (contractor) generators.

Do the car companies usually give the adaptors or do you usually need to buy them separate? [ ccs, tesla, 110v, 220v]
The company gives you a portable "EVSE" which with Tesla, and I expect Rivian, has an adapter for a standard 120V household outlet. Tesla used to give a couple of other adapters but you now have to buy these separately. The NEMA 14-50R is no doubt the most popular (to the point that Tesla used to include an adapter for this one) as they are pretty much everywhere. There are adapters for dryer outlets.

Since these wont be used with the Tesla sc network, which companies offer super charging, im guessing i would need to have an account with each.
Electrify America (EA) is the one you will be using with your Rivian as it has DC chargers with enough oomph to charge one in reasonable time. But there are many others. Use PlugShare to see which companies operate in the areas you intend to drive in. Yes, you will need an account with each but most allow you to set up one quickly upon arrival at the station.


Have you used a better route planner?
Yes, all the time. Use it to plan trips, to compare what a trip in a Rivian will be like compared to one in a Tesla, etc.

Been playing with it, but sometimes it sends me through a longer route, but it says that the driving time is reduced[ i dont think it can calculate traffic]
Actually I think maybe it can if you subscribe to the Premium service (for a fee). But in any case it gives you lots of flexibility. You can dial in head/tail winds, extra vehicle weight, your own estimates of consumption etc. But it finds the "optimum" route based on its optimality criteria - not yours. It may, and this is especially the case with Rivian, send you pretty far off the most direct route to get you to a 150 kW EA charger (probably at a Walmart) even though there is a 50 kW station right along the route.


Range wise, for tesla for example, if the epa says 300miles, how accurate is it? Mainly in the highway only. Not worried about city. I think epa does the highway at 60mph which is prob too slow.
You can't really ask how accurate it is. You should ask what the uncertainty is. Based on records of my driving the X 90% of the drives I make deliver range from 94 miles less than the EPA range to 173 miles over the EPA range (351 miles) at between 40 and 50 miles an hour. As speed increases to 70 mph range reduces, on average, to 78% of that. The EPA range is a guideline only!


For rivian specifically would be the range off road since the batteries are larger and there wouldnt be drag, but the motors are working harder. Prob cant answer this one, but an opinion would be welcome too :D
Off road range isn't really even comparable to EPA range. The biggest range eaters are high speed (won't have that off road), kinnetic loss (going up and down hill) and, probably the biggest, rolling resistance from loose gravel, mud, sand etc.
 
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Hmp10

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Do I need to install any specific plug for an ev or a regular dryer outlet works, and how much of an increase you see in your electric bill [ just for reference since prices vary].

I charge from a FEMA 14-50 dryer plug. Newer EVs often sell wall-mount chargers, but I think FEMA plugs still come with the car (or are available from the car manufacturer). The real issue is to have adequate amperage to maximize charging speed. I installed a 50-amp line to charge my Tesla, which only draws 32 amps. I also installed a 100-amp line at the same time for a future EV, which will now be used by my Lucid Air.

When I got the Tesla, I'm sure my electric bill went up. However, whatever the increase was, it fell within the month-to-month variance I had been seeing, so I never got a direct measure. However, due to A/C needs in south Florida, my electric bill typically runs between $400-500 a month. If your monthly bill runs lower, you'll probably see an increase more clearly than I did.

Can it be charged from a generator?

Yes. I kept my Tesla charged off a generator during the 9 days we were without power after Hurricane Irma in 2017. I was the only one of my friends who stayed mobile during that time, as the few service stations that could pump gas were reserved for emergency responders.

Do the car companies usually give the adaptors or do you usually need to buy them separate?

In 2015 my Tesla came with a full set of adapters. I think Tesla and most EVs now only provide a home charging cord in addition to whatever adapter its charging stations use (Supercharger, CCS, etc.).

Since these wont be used with the Tesla sc network, which companies offer super charging, im guessing i would need to have an account with each.

It varies with the charging stations you will use. I can only speak to Electrify America, with whom Lucid has an agreement but whose chargers can be used with any brand that has a CCS or a CHAdeMO plug or an adapter. You can use an Electrify America charger without an account by swiping or entering a credit card. (I think this is the case with all other providers, but I'm not sure.)

You can also set up an account with Electrify America to ease the log-on to their system. If you sign up for a $4 monthly fee, your credit card information is kept on file and instantly logs you in when you plug your car in. You also get a discount on the charging price if you have this feature.

Have you used a better route planner? Been playing with it, but sometimes it sends me through a longer route, but it says that the driving time is reduced[ i dont think it can calculate traffic].

Frankly, I haven't found a route planner I like. I'm hoping the Lucid will have Electrify America locations loaded into its navigation system. I think A Better Route Planner may use speed limit data to determine the travel time on one route versus another, rather than real-time traffic flow.

Tesla has its Supercharger locations loaded into the navigation system, but my brother, who takes more road trips than I, has found that some Tesla Superchargers have come on line that were not showing in his navigation system, despite keeping it updated over the air.

Range wise, for tesla for example, if the epa says 300miles, how accurate is it?

That's a hard one. There are so many variables, and they almost always reduce the actual range you'll get relative to the EPA rating: weather, roadway topography, speed, acceleration habits, traffic conditions.

I sometimes drive my Tesla across "Alligator Alley", which is a smooth, flat, straight, lightly-traveled stretch of Interstate 75 across the Florida Everglades. Several times I have done an informal range test on this road when the weather is clear and the temperature has been between 80-90 degrees. I set the A/C to 72, run the audio system at medium volume, and set the cruise control at 75 mph. Traffic is almost always light. I use the highway roadside markers to measure mileage. I have found that, in these conditions, the car uses up approximately 10 miles of indicated range for every 6 miles of actual road travel.

I should point out, though, that many other people, including posters on this forum, have found their cars get closer to EPA range in the conditions and manner in which they drive. Also, driving exclusively at interstate speeds is the kind of driving when EVs are at their least efficient. The more mixed driving you put into the mix, the more likely you're going to approach the EPA range.

My problem with that is that EVs accelerate with such venom that I have trouble keeping my right foot under control. It's just such a hoot to blast away from a stop any time traffic allows.

For rivian specifically would be the range off road since the batteries are larger and there wouldnt be drag, but the motors are working harder. Prob cant answer this one, but an opinion would be welcome too.

You're right. I really can't answer this one. My impression is that R. J. Scaringe, like Peter Rawlinson at Lucid, doesn't make claims he can't substantiate. I think his pronouncements about real-world range are going to be as reliable as you can get, given all the variables mentioned earlier.
 
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Hmp10

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I can tell you this, Babbuino.

Like so many, I worried about charging issues, reliability issues, cost issues, etc. before I got my first EV.

Within a week of the car's delivery, those things fell into the rearview mirror. Driving an EV was just so much damned fun that I have never looked back.

And that was over five years ago. I think anyone buying an EV today from a company as buttoned-down as Rivian appears to be has even less reason to worry.
 

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Brand/Model specific forums are generally biased source of information. In pre-COVID days, I would have suggested you attend a National Drive Electric Week event where you would have gotten to chat with various owners, see a variety of EVs and often get a chance to test drive some outside of the dealership environment. For the most part those events have gone virtual this year, but would still be an excellent source of info:
https://driveelectricweek.org/

Plug In America also has an EV support program that allows you to call in and ask questions. One time for free for non-members, then a small fee (or you can become a supporter :)):
https://pluginamerica.org/why-go-plug-in/ev-support-program/

You can also look for a local chapter of the Electric Auto Association. This is a 501(c)(3) organization of volunteers founded in 1967. IT took off in the oil crisis of the 70's as a resource for those looking to convert their gas vehicles to electric. Today, they still have a few people doing conversions, but mostly just help guide people with exactly the info you are looking for.
https://www.electricauto.org/
There are a number of chapters in FL

First charging. Do I need to install any specific plug for an ev or a regular dryer outlet works
EVSE's are available with a wide variety of plugs, and are available with a 30A plug that should match your dryer outlet (unless it is the older style, but switching outlets is relatively easy). Dryer circuits will provide much faster charging than a 120V outlet, but slower than the Rivian is capable of.

There is a 30% Tax Credit that expires this year for the purchase and installation costs of charging equipment. If you install a dedicated circuit (and even upgraded your panel/service if needed) it would qualify even if you do not yet have an EV.

... how much of an increase you see in your electric bill [ just for reference since prices vary]
You can ball park it on the conservative side at 2.2 mi/kWh. If your incremental electric cost is $.12, it would be ~$54 per thousand miles ($.12/2.2 gives you the cost per mile).

Can it be charged from a generator?
Most manufacturers say "no" in the owners manuals, but many people do. It can be problematic with the grounding protocol of the J1772 standard and you would definitely want a sine wave type generator.

Do the car companies usually give the adaptors or do you usually need to buy them separate? [ ccs, tesla, 110v, 220v]
You are talking the two different "ends" for charging? There will most likely be a portable charge cord included with the Rivian. It is usually just used for 120V charging, but a few companies offer them with plug adapters (Nissan, Tesla) that allow them to be used on both 120 and 240V circuits. I think that Rivian will probably offer the latter, but they are readily available in any case.

On the vehicle side, the Rivian will use a CCS1 type connector. The plugs on both 120V and 240V charging stations use the upper part (J1772), when you plug into a DC Fast Charger, there are two additional pins that are used (the "nozzle" is physically bigger as well)

1597420534642.png


Tesla uses CCS2 in Europe, but has their own connector in the US. They provide an adapter to the J1772 standard to US owners.
There is a "Tesla Tap" available that would allow you to use Tesla 240V charging stations. These are fairly common at hotels/restaurants (Tesla provided them for free). These are commonly called "destination chargers" (instead of Superchargers that are Tesla's version of DC fast charging). They are often installed in blocks of four - 3 Tesla and one Clipper Creek J1772 (but sometimes one of each or just the Tesla). They are usually free to patrons as they are not set up for any payment method. Looking for Hotels/B&B's with these can be an integral part of route planning on long trips.

Since these wont be used with the Tesla sc network, which companies offer super charging, im guessing i would need to have an account with each.
Yes, you would need an account with each. There is a standard in place that would allow querying the vehicle and billing that way (as opposed to a fob/card/phone app), but implementing it has been problematic since there would need to be a centralized database that all the charging companies could query. Tesla owns their own network and therefor keeps that info themselves (some vehicles are free for life, others have a limited free amount, some always have to pay)

Have you used a better route planner? Been playing with it, but sometimes it sends me through a longer route, but it says that the driving time is reduced[ i dont think it can calculate traffic]
I haven't, but many people use it alongside PlugShare (both have their strengths and weaknesses)

Range wise, for tesla for example, if the epa says 300miles, how accurate is it? Mainly in the highway only. Not worried about city. I think epa does the highway at 60mph which is prob too slow.
EPA hwy has an average speed of 48 mph with some acceleration/deceleration. A 300 mile EPA rating will be a combined rating, with the highway portion a bit lower (and city higher). It would likely be something like 280. This is something that we will have to wait and see, but 75 mph will yield lower range than the EPA why rating in most circumstances. Cold/wet/snowy weather (and also hot to a lesser degree) will impact range.

For rivian specifically would be the range off road since the batteries are larger and there wouldnt be drag, but the motors are working harder. Prob cant answer this one, but an opinion would be welcome too :D
Off road could be rock crawling up a steep slope or just traveling along a dirt road. So ??

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