Lucid Air over 500 miles on a charge!

ajdelange

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Trying to fit marketing terms into binary categories is fraught with error.
It's actually the other way round. The problem come when marketers borrow engineering terminology in their campaigns and the lay public comes away thinking that the marketers terminology is somehow correct even though the marketers intention is to decieve rather than inform. That's clearly the case here. It can result, as it did here, in flawed syllogism. Premise A)The Mercedes has two degrees of freedom (True) Premise B)They call their system Active (True) Conclusion)To be active a system must have 2 degrees of freedom.

The latest Tesla Model S suspension is, from what I've read (I haven't ridden is a Tesla since the Roadster long ago), a hydraulic damping with electrically modulated valves, which they like to call "active damping".
That is, from what I can observe what it is. So it is a suspension system. And, as it requires a source of external energy (an air compressor) to operate it is not a passive suspension system. The WORLDS definition, used in untold numbers of industries and academia, of active is "not passive". Therefore, to say the Tesla system is not an active system is to deny the globaly accepted definition because it conflicts with your flawed reasoning that an active system must have two degrees of freedom which you arrived at by false syllogism. Now this does not mean that the Mercedes system is not active. If it is indeed lifting wheels independent of the roadway it must have an energy source to do that and is therefore an active system. But this does not mean that a system has to do that to be active.


That's not the same as an "active suspension",
It is clear to anyone with technical background, that the Tesla system is, an active system. Not the same as the Mercedes system but an active system nonetheless.

...which doesn't have an SAE definition I could casually find,
The E in SAE stands for Engineers. Engineers in many of its subdisciplines know perfectly well what Active and Passive mean. There would be no need for the SAE to promulgate its own definition of Active and Passive as those mean exactly the same thing to an automotive engineer as they do to an electrical engineer or mechanical engineer or biomedical engineer.


so it's going to be misused and misinterpreted
Well clearly you and Hmp are misinterpreting it but is not misused or misinterpreted by the engineers at SAE, at Tesla, or your faithful correspondent. But you are not technical people and so we overlook your little error. Our only suggestion is that you stop trying to sell those of us who do understand these things on your misconceptions. I've been dealing with active and passive devices for long enough that it's going to be pretty hard to convince me that the engineering/scientific community has been wrong all these years.



But, I've also read the Cybertruck is supposedly going to have an active suspension.
Well as the current cars (at least the X and the S) have it now I'd be surprised if the CT didn't. Were there to be a difference in the CT it might be to add that second degree of freedom. Easy enough (conceptually) to do by sealing the cylinder at the rod end and putting air ports on both sides of the piston.


Also, from what I've read (from their website), the Rivian will have an adjustable air suspension, where the adjustability is for height, and adaptive damping control, similar to the latest Tesla.
I don't doubt that. I'm not sure whether they will have the active component or not as I think the reason Tesla is able to do that is because of the incredible on board computing power.


There's no mention of an active suspension, as I believe they would have highlighted that as it's a significant performance (and comfort) improvement. It'd be nice to have.
When I picked up my new X which has the active suspension as opposed to my old one which didn't, I was told to expect a huge difference in ride comfort. To tell the truth judging from inputs to the sensor I used to use in most of my instrument flying the difference is not that great. I can still feel the road. Perhaps I haven't pushed all the right buttons in the right combination yet.
 
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ajdelange

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The base model has been announced with 406 mile range (EPA).
They gotcha!. It isn't EPA range (it can't be until EPA certifies it and it doesn't even exist yet). It is "projected range". BTW that doesn't mean that the EPA range won't come in at close to that number. I expect Lucid has been pretty careful to not "project" a number that is going to be too far off what the EPA will eventually certify.

We note that the Tesla X just got an extra 20 miles bringing it to 370. The X I bought less than 2 years ago was only 294! The S is 402. The Rivians will be 400 mi. So 400 miles is now getting to be more or less what we expect. I guess the goal posts have now been moved to 500 and we will presumably be there in a couple of years with the Cybertruck (and other players too, I am sure).
 
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ajdelange

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What would you have me ask them?
 

Babbuino

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Interview with Lucid's CEO
 

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