Hydraulic Lines Exposed to Damage?

R1T7777

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I went to Venice to check out the R1T and crawled under to look at the suspension and underbody. A couple of concerns popped up. One was that the plate under much of the body was a thin carbon fiber plate (likely backed by metal). I’d be concerned about damaging the (likely expensive) plate on rocks.

Additionally, the rear suspension has 2 hydraulic (?) lines that hang lower than and in front of the lower A arms. They have no bash plates or protection I can see, and seem extremely vulnerable to rock damage.
I know Rivian has done a lot of testing, and I trust their engineering, but definitely something to watch for.
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I would think that damaging the underbody plate is perfectly fine (scratches, scuffs, dings, etc.) so long as the damage doesn't compromise the plate itself. Its purpose is to absorb damage in order to protect the battery.

Any severe damage that would necessitate replacement is going to be better than severe damage that would have otherwise punctured the battery and possibly destroyed the entire car.
 

SoCal Rob

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3A0B6410-F0B9-48E5-A635-C3A7C2F855E4.jpeg

I went to Venice to check out the R1T and crawled under to look at the suspension and underbody. A couple of concerns popped up. One was that the plate under much of the body was a thin carbon fiber plate (likely backed by metal). I’d be concerned about damaging the (likely expensive) plate on rocks.

Additionally, the rear suspension has 2 hydraulic (?) lines that hang lower than and in front of the lower A arms. They have no bash plates or protection I can see, and seem extremely vulnerable to rock damage.
I know Rivian has done a lot of testing, and I trust their engineering, but definitely something to watch for.
As @bd5400 wrote, the plate is there to protect the battery pack and any damage taken by the plate which preserves the integrity of the battery is acceptable to me. I really don’t care if it gets scrapes and scratches on it since it isn’t part of the aesthetics to me.

I’ll be curious to see if the lines remain as shown in the production vehicles. It could be that they are flexible enough and short enough that they’ll just get brushed aside by obstacles rather than getting bashed by them, but probably worth a closer look at delivery time.
 

CommodoreAmiga

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As @bd5400 wrote, the plate is there to protect the battery pack and any damage taken by the plate which preserves the integrity of the battery is acceptable to me. I really don’t care if it gets scrapes and scratches on it since it isn’t part of the aesthetics to me.

I’ll be curious to see if the lines remain as shown in the production vehicles. It could be that they are flexible enough and short enough that they’ll just get brushed aside by obstacles rather than getting bashed by them, but probably worth a closer look at delivery time.
The problem comes from objects like fallen trees, where a branch could theoretically "hook" the line when driving over it. Then it's just a matter of whether the branch or brake line is stronger -- at least one must break.

I do hope they've found a way to better route/hide those lines.
 

Joel

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The problem comes from objects like fallen trees, where a branch could theoretically "hook" the line when driving over it. Then it's just a matter of whether the branch or brake line is stronger -- at least one must break.

I do hope they've found a way to better route/hide those lines.
This was probably the issues with the Rebel Rally vehicle.
 
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R1T7777

R1T7777

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As @bd5400 wrote, the plate is there to protect the battery pack and any damage taken by the plate which preserves the integrity of the battery is acceptable to me. I really don’t care if it gets scrapes and scratches on it since it isn’t part of the aesthetics to me.

I’ll be curious to see if the lines remain as shown in the production vehicles. It could be that they are flexible enough and short enough that they’ll just get brushed aside by obstacles rather than getting bashed by them, but probably worth a closer look at delivery time.
They are not flexible. They have a metal housing angled towards the front. Very crushable.
I’m not worried about aesthetics on the plate, more about durability. Metal dents, carbon fiber cracks. It just seemed a lot thinner than I expected. Like, it moved when I pushed on it with my hand.
 

lg3103

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are those lines in the same spot when the vehicle is at max height or just at a lower height setting?
 

DTM

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most carbon fiber components are somewhat brittle (depending on the resin used) & will fail without much deformation. The more laminations the stiffer the part is. I agree the lines should be protected by some manner of shield which can move with the suspension movement.
 
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R1T7777

R1T7777

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I would think that damaging the underbody plate is perfectly fine (scratches, scuffs, dings, etc.) so long as the damage doesn't compromise the plate itself. Its purpose is to absorb damage in order to protect the battery.

Any severe damage that would necessitate replacement is going to be better than severe damage that would have otherwise punctured the battery and possibly destroyed the entire car.
I don’t mind damage, I was just expecting it to be thicker and stronger.
 
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R1T7777

R1T7777

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If the lines don't get changed then that is a good candidate for some aftermarket brackets to protect them. I know I would be fabricating or purchasing something to prevent damage.
Was thinking the same thing, but hard to imagine where to attach said brackets.
 

SoCal Rob

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They are not flexible. They have a metal housing angled towards the front. Very crushable.
Just to be sure I understand correctly…

I was under the impression that each wheel has three hydraulic lines going to it: one for the friction/traditional/disc brakes and two for the suspension.

I recall an earlier discussion regarding the hydraulic brake line having a rigid metal piece joining the caliper to the flexible brake line.

Are you saying that these two lines, which I assumed were the suspension lines, are verified to have the same configuration as the brake line? From the pic it looks like two flexible lines, possibly wrapped, but I’m sure what you saw in real life was better than what I’m seeing in the pic.
 
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R1T7777

R1T7777

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are those lines in the same spot when the vehicle is at max height or just at a lower height setting?
They were exposed at both high and low suspension settings.
 

BigE

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They were exposed at both high and low suspension settings.
In your opinion, adding the Off-Road package, I think just adds the front tow hooks, plus front and rear skid plates which it sounds like you are referring to, but nothing additional to the battery protection per Rivian. Is this worth $2,000? In seeing your pictures, I'm thinking for me personally, no.

Edit: After looking more at your picture I'm really torn. If you remove those plates, what is there? It really looks like the Off-Road package makes the underbelly much more aerodynamic. If you remove the plates, do you have large empty pockets that may suck up debris from the rear tires or cause airflow disturbance under the truck at highway speeds? More reasons why Rivian needs to show us with and without....Please Rivian
 
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