Home Charging Speed

doeboy

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I drive about 250 miles per day commuting to work. I leave at 5:00am and return about 7:00pm. assuming most of my battery charge is used up ( I drive 80mph most of the way ) with the 400mile range vehicle I expect to have less than 70miles of range remaining at the end of the day ( based on my model X real world range at 80mph) so with a charging speed of 25 mph/hr for the 10 hours at home my Rivian will not be fully charged for the next day. Is this the fastest home charging speed possible at home? thanks for any help here. My model X charged at 42 mph/hr.
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I drive about 250 miles per day commuting to work. I leave at 5:00am and return about 7:00pm. assuming most of my battery charge is used up ( I drive 80mph most of the way ) with the 400mile range vehicle I expect to have less than 70miles of range remaining at the end of the day ( based on my model X real world range at 80mph) so with a charging speed of 25 mph/hr for the 10 hours at home my Rivian will not be fully charged for the next day. Is this the fastest home charging speed possible at home? thanks for any help here. My model X charged at 42 mph/hr.
The only way to get faster charging would be to install a DC charger that can do more than 11.5kW charging. It would be expensive though.

With those daily mileage requirements, I’m not sure a Rivian is for you unless you can charge during the day.
 

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The only way to get faster charging would be to install a DC charger that can do more than 11.5kW charging. It would be expensive though.

With those daily mileage requirements, I’m not sure a Rivian is for you unless you can charge during the day.
Yeah I'd say you either need to find a place near where you work to charge or convince your employer to put in a level 2 charger at work or Rivian probably isn't in the cards as your commuter.
 

Dark-Fx

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Move closer to work.
The Rivian's onboard charger is not going to be adequate for you. Your only option is going to be putting a DCFC station in at your house, or stopping to charge somewhere on your route for 15-20 minutes every day. Cheapest unit that I would consider installing will still cost you 5 figures. Most of them rely on 3 phase, which you can't get in a residential setting very easily
 

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R1S/T aren't likely to be as efficient as Model X, at least based on aero - especially at 80 mph. You also might want to talk to Rivian about battery longevity when cycling the pack 10-95% on a daily basis.
 

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Assuming for a moment you drive from home -> office, spend the day there, then drive back from office -> home...

The absolute obvious and best solution - by far - is to have a charger installed at the office for (up to) 48A charging during the day.

Whether that involves talking to your boss, the owner of the company, the building manager or building owner... or all of them... That's by far your best bet here.

Second best is have a 50A outlet available for use at the office and bring your own Rivian portable charger for 32A charging during the day.
Even a 30A dryer circuit can safely give you 24A during the day, which should be more than enough.

Third best is to identify a DCFC (EA, etc) on your commute route where you don't mind stretching your legs for 15m to grab a coffee or a soda. That would be more than enough to get your electron budget into the black for the day.

Finally, install a DCFC at home. Which is not something remotely practical for most people.

You'd need 3-phase power, a hefty installation budget, and by relying on nightly DCFC to bring you from empty to full you'll probably actually start to notice battery degredation earlier than any other Rivian owner.

Edit: Found a home-targeting DCFC EVSE that does NOT require 3-phase power.

This guy charges at 25kw on 1-phase power (vs 11.5kw using level 2 at 48A) which would be enough for you, OP.

You just need a 165A breaker... 😆
 
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10*11 = 110kwh recharged per day.

It's probably doable, but you are super border line.

F150 might be a better option with the faster charger, but if you can get an outlet at work that's your best option.

I did pass my feedback that I'm sad not to see a 15kwh AC charger on the max pack, but not many do anymore. Your Tesla may have one depending on year.
 
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I drive about 250 miles per day commuting to work. I leave at 5:00am and return about 7:00pm. assuming most of my battery charge is used up ( I drive 80mph most of the way ) with the 400mile range vehicle I expect to have less than 70miles of range remaining at the end of the day ( based on my model X real world range at 80mph) so with a charging speed of 25 mph/hr for the 10 hours at home my Rivian will not be fully charged for the next day. Is this the fastest home charging speed possible at home? thanks for any help here. My model X charged at 42 mph/hr.
25 MPH charging is 32A at 240V. This is not the fastest option. Rivians can take up to 48V.

You'd want a 60A breaker installed, which gives you 48A rated with a 48A capable charger (haven't read the Rivian charger specs, would think it does this). You will need to 'hard wire' the charger not put in a plug as anything over 40A (in the us) requires hardwire to pass code in most areas.

This would give you 11.5 KW of charging instead of 7KW of charging, so you'd get about 30-34 miles in an hour of charging. So while not 2x as fast, about 60% more. That'd be about 330 miles of charging from 7pm to 5am.
 

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250 miles @ 80 mph is going to need at least 125 kwh. L2 will deliver at most 10.5 kW so you will need to charge at least 11.9 hrs Obviously some of that will have to be done during the day or at a DCFC
 

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25 MPH charging is 32A at 240V. This is not the fastest option. Rivians can take up to 48V.

You'd want a 60A breaker installed, which gives you 48A rated with a 48A capable charger (haven't read the Rivian charger specs, would think it does this). You will need to 'hard wire' the charger not put in a plug as anything over 40A (in the us) requires hardwire to pass code in most areas.

This would give you 11.5 KW of charging instead of 7KW of charging, so you'd get about 30-34 miles in an hour of charging. So while not 2x as fast, about 60% more. That'd be about 330 miles of charging from 7pm to 5am.
Rivian is quoting the 25 miles for the 48A Wall Charger and 16 miles for the 32A charge cord included with the vehicle.
EPA rated consumption "from the wall" is 2.08 mi/kWh (48 kWh/100 miles)
2.08 x 11.5 (48A)= 24 miles (or close to the 25 Rivian is quoting)
2.08 x 7.7 (32A) = 16 miles

Makes sense since:
48A is 50% more than 32A
24 miles is 50% more than 16
 

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Rivian is quoting the 25 miles for the 48A Wall Charger and 16 miles for the 32A charge cord included with the vehicle.
EPA rated consumption "from the wall" is 2.08 mi/kWh (48 kWh/100 miles)
2.08 x 11.5 (48A)= 24 miles (or close to the 25 Rivian is quoting)
2.08 x 7.7 (32A) = 16 miles

Makes sense since:
48A is 50% more than 32A
24 miles is 50% more than 16

Interesting. That does not jive with my three EVs results. They all have different size batteries yet 32A @ 240V always puts roughly 25 miles in an hour into them. My tesla with a 75 kwh battery takes longer to fully charge, but it has more miles than my 80 mile 24 kwh battery that takes three hours to charge to max. I haven't charge my Bolt since April (returned it lease was up) but again I got 25M of range in an hour of charging at 32A @ 240V.

Time will tell, when folks like out of spec motoring get them for more than a bit and can do their in depth testing, but that doesn't make sense to me based on my experience.

When our ID.4 gets here next week I'll see what it does as well, it's replacing the Fiat.
 

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25 MPH charging is 32A at 240V. This is not the fastest option. Rivians can take up to 48V.

You'd want a 60A breaker installed, which gives you 48A rated with a 48A capable charger (haven't read the Rivian charger specs, would think it does this). You will need to 'hard wire' the charger not put in a plug as anything over 40A (in the us) requires hardwire to pass code in most areas.

This would give you 11.5 KW of charging instead of 7KW of charging, so you'd get about 30-34 miles in an hour of charging. So while not 2x as fast, about 60% more. That'd be about 330 miles of charging from 7pm to 5am.
11.5kw from the wall is only about 10.5kw to the vehicle, at 2.4mi/kw is 25.2 mi/hr. It's basically the exact spec of my current EV which is on a 60amp circuit.
 

Dbeglor

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Interesting. That does not jive with my three EVs results. They all have different size batteries yet 32A @ 240V always puts roughly 25 miles in an hour into them. My tesla with a 75 kwh battery takes longer to fully charge, but it has more miles than my 80 mile 24 kwh battery that takes three hours to charge to max. I haven't charge my Bolt since April (returned it lease was up) but again I got 25M of range in an hour of charging at 32A @ 240V.

Time will tell, when folks like out of spec motoring get them for more than a bit and can do their in depth testing, but that doesn't make sense to me based on my experience.

When our ID.4 gets here next week I'll see what it does as well, it's replacing the Fiat.
You can't compare mi/hr across vehicles, because then you're not talking about just charging speed, you're talking about driving efficiency once charged.
 

Trekkie

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EPA rated consumption "from the wall" is 2.08 mi/kWh (48 kWh/100 miles)
2.08 x 11.5 (48A)= 24 miles (or close to the 25 Rivian is quoting)
2.08 x 7.7 (32A) = 16 miles

Makes sense since:
48A is 50% more than 32A
24 miles is 50% more than 16
208V is three phase power, at home with a dual legged (or whatever that's called) breaker you get 240V so with your math the numbers would be.

2.40 * 11.5 = 27.6
2.40 * 7.7 = 18.48
 

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You can't compare mi/hr across vehicles, because then you're not talking about just charging speed, you're talking about driving efficiency once charged.
I'm not comparing the wh/mi numbers, I'm stating exactly what the car reports when my charger is plugged into it and how long it takes to charge the battery.

yesterday I charged my Tesla X with a 75kwh battery. it charged for 6 hours 4m, added 152.35 miles of range. that comes out to 25.3 miles per hour.

yesterday I charged my Fiat 500E. It doesn't have fancy data logging like the tesla does, but when I plugged it in it said it'd be charged in 2hr 45m, based on its limited dash information that meant 25 miles in an hour of charging.
 
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