EV Battery Hits (Master list)

EdA

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Edward
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Okay, I do have questions about this. I've had a number of ICE vehicles in the past that were much more fuel efficient when you accelerated as fast as you could to your desired speed, and then just babied it to maintain that speed (completely contrary to what most believe). Some others have used a lot more fuel in doing that and required you to slowly ease up to your desired speed for the best fuel efficiency.

Not having had electric vehicles before, how do most fair in those regards? Technically it should take the same amount of energy to propel a vehicle to a given speed, so what's actually the most efficient? If I slowly ease it up to 60mph, or if I accelerate full blast to 50mph and let my momentum carry me to 60mph? I know the latter will be harder on the vehicle, but which actually uses less power?
As a two-time Tesla owner, they provide an energy graph and Wh/mi usage averaged over the past 30 miles. If you're doing a lot of rocket launches (or fun green light accelerations) versus driving with a moderate amount of acceleration you'll see much more energy usage.

The original Model S was rated for 265 miles and there's a guy who hyper-miled and drove for something like 18 hours straight at 25mph and got over 400 miles of range.

https://arstechnica.com/cars/2015/08/norwegian-hypermiler-drives-tesla-452-miles-on-a-single-charge/

So there's a happy medium between trying to set a world distance record and driving like you stole it. You just have to realize where you are on the spectrum, especially if you are cutting it close on range.
 

BigE

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This may be helpful for some as a cold-weather example with a Tesla Model 3.

 
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Rivian_Hugh_III

Rivian_Hugh_III

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Let's say I move to Canada in 5 years with my 316mi R1T.
Then there is a snow storm, and an emergency [emergency, so I'm only charged to 80%] occurs that I have to drive 40 miles from my home.
I have 20s, it's snowing, I'm not going +60 due to weather, but it's cold, so I must use the heater.
Looks like I won't make those 40mi without stopping for a quick charge since I only have 31.6miles range 😞
12.5+7.5+20+20+10+20=90%
Luckily for us that’s not how it works. You multiply the percentages of the positive percents (1.00 - diminishment percent), so:

(0.875 * 0.925 * 0.80 * 0.80 * 0.90 * 0.80) * 314 = 117.0906 miles of range
 
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