Dimensions of storage spaces

OverZealous

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I’m pretty sure the R1T is 51” between the wheels. If you look at the pics, and the website, it definitely shows everything as between the wheels. If nothing else, it’s probably 48” between wheels, since they specifically say a sheet of plywood:

EA8AD189-94F1-46CC-99D4-E4B64D8BCE2D.jpeg

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r1t_kev

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I don't recall seeing these frunk dimensions called out on the website until now:

Screenshot from 2022-01-13 10-22-44.png
 

Dark-Fx

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I don't recall seeing these frunk dimensions called out on the website until now:

Screenshot from 2022-01-13 10-22-44.png
I bought my cooler based off these dimensions but they absolutely aren't reliable. They are maximum dimensions of a non-rectangular space. Those dimensions equal about 18.2 cubic feet, but the bi-line says the frunk is 11 cubic feet. That's a huge discrepancy.
 

crashmtb

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I bought my cooler based off these dimensions but they absolutely aren't reliable. They are maximum dimensions of a non-rectangular space. Those dimensions equal about 18.2 cubic feet, but the bi-line says the frunk is 11 cubic feet. That's a huge discrepancy.
it is tapered below the folding shelf.
 

dpc166

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Well, fair. I guess I would expect (hope) a mid-size truck to fit stuff with the tailgate down for those occasional trips to home improvement stores, etc. I'm not expecting Ford Super Duty levels of utility, but something more than my Subaru would be nice. I can't even fit a half sheet inside my car - I've certainly looked a fool trying!
LOL, I have the plug-in Crosstrek and there's definitely a tough time ahead trying to fit plywood in my car, but I likely can't fit a half sheet in my car either. 4x4 plywood is difficult, 2x4 would be easy.
 

dpc166

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I’m pretty sure the R1T is 51” between the wheels. If you look at the pics, and the website, it definitely shows everything as between the wheels. If nothing else, it’s probably 48” between wheels, since they specifically say a sheet of plywood:

EA8AD189-94F1-46CC-99D4-E4B64D8BCE2D.jpeg

7F80E12E-47AD-423C-8644-17542E9E80D7.jpeg
I still don't quite like how that's worded because it could certainly mean that you can load plywood over the humps. Not a deal breaker, but you would need supports under the load so nothing bends (especially sheetrock).
 

Gearhead500

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I still don't quite like how that's worded because it could certainly mean that you can load plywood over the humps. Not a deal breaker, but you would need supports under the load so nothing bends (especially sheetrock).
There are no humps aka wheel wells
EDIT- I’m an idiot. Also see the next post 🤪
 
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OverZealous

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It appears the wheel humps are either under the bed overhang, or barely wider (and there's 3" to spare from the 51" spec).

If I ever get invited to an event, I'm definitely bringing a tape measure. While I know the primary use case these vehicles are designed for is not lumber, it's really the main reason I want a truck and not just a normal SUV. Here's hoping. It would be a real shame for the vehicle to miss that critical 48" width by what looks to be a really small amount.
 

dpc166

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It appears the wheel humps are either under the bed overhang, or barely wider (and there's 3" to spare from the 51" spec).

If I ever get invited to an event, I'm definitely bringing a tape measure. While I know the primary use case these vehicles are designed for is not lumber, it's really the main reason I want a truck and not just a normal SUV. Here's hoping. It would be a real shame for the vehicle to miss that critical 48" width by what looks to be a really small amount.
Yeah, if I'm buying this vehicle, it's to own it for 20 years so I would need it for all kinds of lumber when I need to do renovations, plus be able to handle whatever 20 years will bring.
 

OverZealous

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Yeah, if I'm buying this vehicle, it's to own it for 20 years so I would need it for all kinds of lumber when I need to do renovations, plus be able to handle whatever 20 years will bring.
I hear you, but I don’t think that it’s going to be realistic to get 20 years out of a first-run premium/luxury vehicle from a new company.

I only say this as someone who planned on driving a Model S until it fell apart, only to realize that luxury vehicles have a lot more points of failure, and are pretty expensive to maintain. I’m 7 years in, and starting to wonder about how much longer I want to fix stupid things out-of-pocket. Plus, the battery warranty is coming up, and I’m not sure I want to own this kind of vehicle without a battery warranty.

On top of that, the support network for Rivian is going to take some time to ramp up, so it might be a while before they are able to efficiently service them.

That’s all to say, I’m not discouraging you from getting one, but you may need to have tempered expectations vs a pure-utility pickup that has fewer points of failure. These are brand new, high-tech devices that are going to probably come with some headaches for a few years.
 

r1t_kev

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LOL, I have the plug-in Crosstrek and there's definitely a tough time ahead trying to fit plywood in my car, but I likely can't fit a half sheet in my car either. 4x4 plywood is difficult, 2x4 would be easy.
I've put so much in the back of my Crosstrek that I wouldn't have thought would fit: 8' lumber, big TV, Christmas trees, etc. The 4x4 piece of plywood was the kicker; I didn't even measure, just figured it had to fit. I stood in the Lowe's parking lot scratching my head and failing to insert that sheet in any opening at any angle. I was laughing at myself thinking about how ridiculous I must look. I literally had to borrow a buddy's truck to bring home a half-sheet. That was the day I decided my next car will be a truck.
 

sub

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While I know the primary use case these vehicles are designed for is not lumber, it's really the main reason I want a truck and not just a normal SUV.
When comparing a pickup and a SUV of the same external dimensions, the SUV usually has more room for lumber.

In an SUV you can fold the 2nd row, and use that space for your cargo. Unless you were looking at a 2-door pickup, the bed is going to be much shorter than the (folded) cargo space of an SUV. And for narrower items, the lumber can extend all the way to windshield, either by folding the passenger seat or sticking it between the two front seats. My Suburban has swallowed 12 foot lumber on numerous occasions - with the tailgate closed. How many pickup trucks could do that?

The R1T/R1S makes this comparison more complicated since the R1S is shorter. But in general the pros of a pickup over an SUV does not include lumber. It is the ability to haul things that will make a huge mess in the cabin, like unbagged soil, mulch, leaves, or gravel and for tall things were the roof gets in the way.
 

OverZealous

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When comparing a pickup and a SUV of the same external dimensions, the SUV usually has more room for lumber.
I don't entirely agree. There's more nuance to this. I have a 3-row Acadia right now, that I can fit 4x8 sheets in (width-wise).

  • The Acadia, with only 2 passengers, is still only 6.5' long inside to the front seats. So to get anything longer, you need the tailgate up, which is not a nice experience in winter.
  • The R1T has 7' of bed with the tailgate down, and can still carry 5 passengers. So you can run out to the grocery store, pick up a few 4x8 sheets, and come home, all while enclosed the vehicle, with your child(ren) & wife.
  • The width inside an SUV is usually narrower than the equivalent truck, simply because it has more creature comforts in the back seat (arm rests, nicer materials, etc). So in the case of my Acadia, the plywood just barely fits. The seatbelts get dragged along trying to slide it in.
  • The biggest reason to me, the inside of the SUV is a nice space. Throwing a bunch of plywood in there tears up the carpet & scratches trim, and more. In a pickup, the bed is designed for abuse (as you mentioned).
  • It's also a lot easier to slide materials in when the bed is flat and plastic, as opposed to a typical SUV with uneven or lumpy seats, carpet that snags on materials, etc.
I think the only time an SUV is truly better is when you grabbing something like a couple 2x4s or PVC pipe, which can slide all the way to the front between the seats. I've done this even in our Model S. However, I don't like this for the same reason of scratching up the interior (or damaging screens). And since you can grab a hitch extender for under $200, a pickup with roof bars and a tall extender means you can carry stuff much longer than the inside of the SUV fairly easily.

A van would be better in all cases, but that's getting to be a pretty special-purpose vehicle, and I'd just rent the one from the store in those cases that I needed it (or just have the materials delivered!)
 

sub

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I don't entirely agree. There's more nuance to this. I have a 3-row Acadia right now, that I can fit 4x8 sheets in (width-wise).

  • The Acadia, with only 2 passengers, is still only 6.5' long inside to the front seats. So to get anything longer, you need the tailgate up, which is not a nice experience in winter.
I think you missed the part I put in bold. When comparing SUV/pickup with the same exterior dimensions. The Acadia is 24" shorter than the R1T. It is also quite a bit narrower than the R1T or most full sized suv or pickups. So yes, it has quite a bit less space.

The bed on a crew cab pickup that was the same size as the Acadia would probably be so short that a 4x8 sheet of plywood would not stay in because half of the sheet would be hanging out past the end of the tailgate.

If your Acadia, grew an extra 24 inches in length to match the length of the R1T, you would be able to fit those 4x8 sheets with the tailgate closed, with room to spare.

I do agree with you though that a pickup with the tailgate open is a much nicer experience than an SUV with the tailgate open.
 
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