Cost of a recharge at a public EV charging station

DuckTruck

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Download ABRP and you can see it a couple ways
Agreed,

There is plenty of info on their site at:

https://abetterrouteplanner.com/

You can find pricing info for many of the major players in the charging world, as well as learn about their routing system. It was one of the first to allow you to input either the R1T or R1S as your vehicle, with any of the three battery packs and your projected payload. After entering your path from any one point to another, it will give you turn by turn instructions along the way using your charging preferences to get you there.

As noted here, other systems will do the same, as well as provide info on their charging rates. Some of the systems are more regional, but downloading all of them into your phone might help in a pinch.
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Killer95Stang

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If I am reading this correctly, You can get about 600 miles for $50. That would be about half the cost of Diesel fuel for my Silverado Duramax.

Brian
Yes, but if your Duramax sits in your driveway for 3 weeks or longer, when you start it up you still get 600 miles. If you let your EV sit for extended periods of time in cold weather, you won't have the same miles left due phantom battery drain. That doesn't dissuade me from buying my first EV, because I plan doing most of my charging at home from solar. My case is different, mainly due to my take home work car. I only fill up my F150 about every two months.
 

CommodoreAmiga

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Assuming 1k/mo that is theoretically the average American that comes out to adding $.40/100 miles
Very few EV owners will use DCFC for all (or even most) of their charging. So I don’t think it’s fair to use the total miles driven in the calculation.

for example, my napkin math indicates I’ll pay considerably more to charge my Rivian on some long trips compared to my gas SUV…. But on the 360 other days a year, I end up significantly ahead in the EV thanks to charging at home, where my electric rate is much less expensive and I gain the convenience of never having to stop at a gas station. So overall, the EV is a much better choice, for me, even if it’s more expensive and takes a little longer on one or two journeys a year.

each person must make that determination for themselves, based on their own use case.
 

thrill

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Yes, but if your Duramax sits in your driveway for 3 weeks or longer, when you start it up you still get 600 miles...
Let it sit for six months, even significantly less if it contains ethanol, and it'll probably not start at all. Meanwhile, a plugged in EV is always "fresh".
 

ajdelange

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... If you let your EV sit for extended periods of time in cold weather, you won't have the same miles left due phantom battery drain.
Cold weather doesn't really have a whole lot to do with it. I find that almost half the energy going into the car goes to phantom drain and it's in a heated garage. The reason for the high phantom drain is that there are a couple of nifty third party apps that keep track of what your car is doing, its battery health... that poll the car fairly frequently for data. It's also because I am retired and the car isn't driven that much.

I haven't seen anything on Rivian's phantom draw yet and I haven't seen any apps like Stats or TeslaFi offered for it yet either so the extent of phantom drain will clearly be different but there will be some. The vehicle has to maintain some housekeeping functions when parked.

That doesn't dissuade me from buying my first EV, because I plan doing most of my charging at home from solar. My case is different, mainly due to my take home work car. I only fill up my F150 about every two months.
Solar is, of course, great in many ways but isn't the panacea some may at first think. To begin with, the sun doesn't shine much in the winter around where I live. This last week it has snowed twice and temperatures have stayed, for the most part, below freezing, so many of the panels have prduced 0 for the whole week. That's the first time this has happened but keep in mind that it can happen.
 

Mjhirsch78

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This almost make the case for PHEVs like Rave4 prime.
Nope. The request was what is the cost of 100% public charging, so these numbers represent that. That will not be the case for the vast majority of ev owners.

On average over 80% of charging is done at home. So that cost per 100 miles drops to $0.09-0.15/kw.
Sedan shifts to $3.30/100 miles
Truck shifts to $5/100 miles
assuming 12k miles per year with 80% home charging you are looking at a huge savings with an EV
 
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Max

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Nope. The request was what is the cost of 100% public charging, so these numbers represent that. That will not be the case for the vast majority of ev owners.

On average over 80% of charging is done at home. So that cost per 100 miles drops to $0.09-0.15/kw.
Sedan shifts to $3.30/100 miles
Truck shifts to $5/100 miles
assuming 12k miles per year with 80% home charging you are looking at a huge savings with an EV
I think what you may have missed in my comment is that Rav4 Prime is a PHEV.
  • If you charge at home, you still can charge at home with Prime at the same rate so I don't see your point about home rates except with prime when you drive on electricity, you drive more efficiently so it still cost you less in electricity.
  • If you drive less than 40 miles daily, you have all the advantage of EVs locally and all the security of ICE on road trips. It looks like by your calculation, it will cost less than R1S on both cases.
  • If you go on a road trip, you don't have to plan or stress out about when and where to stop.
  • Your charge/fuling time is reduced on long road trips
  • You still get 1500 watts, 120V plug
  • Prime has 500+ mile range.
  • Prime weighs less than R1S, you pay less for tires and enjoy other advantages of lighter vehicles.
  • If you have to replace the pack, you would spend less
  • If you are not towing, you could pay ~$30K less for Rav4 Prime than you would for R1S
There are definitely some disadvantages that come with complexity and ICE parts of prime but I would say advantages listed above can be mighty compelling depending on individual use case. In fact for me, towing capability is the main difference and I am still not convinced BEV is the right choice for long distance towing.

I am not trying to be argumentative or be in one "team" vs the other. I am just sharing the real thoughts going through my mind in my shopping adventure.
 

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... If you let your EV sit for extended periods of time in cold weather, you won't have the same miles left due phantom battery drain.
Considering that most times EVs are charged from home and, especially in cold weather, one pre-conditions the vehicle for such cold climates, why would anyone subject their vehicle to extended periods not getting charged and subject to phantom drain?
 

r1t_kev

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Considering that most times EVs are charged from home and, especially in cold weather, one pre-conditions the vehicle for such cold climates, why would anyone subject their vehicle to extended periods not getting charged and subject to phantom drain?
Scratched my head on this one too. Outside of ditching your car at the airport for weeks, I can't think of another scenario where you'd leave your EV unplugged for extended periods (in the winter especially). It seems like an easy choice to plug-in and forget - after all, that's what the BMS is for no?
 

Mjhirsch78

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I think what you may have missed in my comment is that Rav4 Prime is a PHEV.
  • If you charge at home, you still can charge at home with Prime at the same rate so I don't see your point about home rates except with prime when you drive on electricity, you drive more efficiently so it still cost you less in electricity.
  • If you drive less than 40 miles daily, you have all the advantage of EVs locally and all the security of ICE on road trips. It looks like by your calculation, it will cost less than R1S on both cases.
  • If you go on a road trip, you don't have to plan or stress out about when and where to stop.
  • Your charge/fuling time is reduced on long road trips
  • You still get 1500 watts, 120V plug
  • Prime has 500+ mile range.
  • Prime weighs less than R1S, you pay less for tires and enjoy other advantages of lighter vehicles.
  • If you have to replace the pack, you would spend less
  • If you are not towing, you could pay ~$30K less for Rav4 Prime than you would for R1S
There are definitely some disadvantages that come with complexity and ICE parts of prime but I would say advantages listed above can be mighty compelling depending on individual use case. In fact for me, towing capability is the main difference and I am still not convinced BEV is the right choice for long distance towing.

I am not trying to be argumentative or be in one "team" vs the other. I am just sharing the real thoughts going through my mind in my shopping adventure.
Fair enough, but there is a big if. IF you plug in, the costs will come pretty close. I looked up the RAV4 and it can do 40 miles on a charge. Based on daily driving habits, that means it will be all electric except for road trips. However, this report makes that assumption a bit harder to accept: https://www.sciencefocus.com/news/plug-in-hybrid-cars-are-they-really-the-eco-friendly-choice/
Scroll down to the section explaining why PHEV emit so much more than expected.

So while it is awesome cost-wise and environment-wise if PHEV is used the way it COULD be, changing habits is hard. To each their own and I appreciate the conversation. It is an interesting time in the automotive world.
 
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RideAlong

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reports of $80 fast charges coming in - FYI
 

DuckTruck

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reports of $80 fast charges coming in - FYI
I may have missed those reports of actual $80 "fillups", but I thought they were just related to the potential for a complete charge of the Max Pack's 180 kWh bundle when paying full price at ElectrifyAmerica. As noted elsewhere, with EA, a $4.00 monthly fee knocks that down by 25%. Still way higher than charging at home, but that's little solace to someone without the ability to plug into the electrical system in multi-family housing, or someone with only street parking.
 

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Cold weather doesn't really have a whole lot to do with it. I find that almost half the energy going into the car goes to phantom drain and it's in a heated garage. The reason for the high phantom drain is that there are a couple of nifty third party apps that keep track of what your car is doing, its battery health... that poll the car fairly frequently for data. It's also because I am retired and the car isn't driven that much.

I haven't seen anything on Rivian's phantom draw yet and I haven't seen any apps like Stats or TeslaFi offered for it yet either so the extent of phantom drain will clearly be different but there will be some. The vehicle has to maintain some housekeeping functions when parked.

Solar is, of course, great in many ways but isn't the panacea some may at first think. To begin with, the sun doesn't shine much in the winter around where I live. This last week it has snowed twice and temperatures have stayed, for the most part, below freezing, so many of the panels have prduced 0 for the whole week. That's the first time this has happened but keep in mind that it can happen.
I have solar panels on my current home, and while recently I am not generating a lot of power in the winter, the way our solar works in oregon is that we accrue the power on a yearly basis(March-Feb every year). So between March and Sept, I over produce solar power and Nov-Jan, I consume more than i produce. For the year, I produce more power than I consume leading to my monthly electric bill be capped around $10/month. I agree, solar is not a panacea, but I do feel better generating renewable energy and hopefully later in the year I can use some of that to fuel my R1T;)
 

Killer95Stang

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Considering that most times EVs are charged from home and, especially in cold weather, one pre-conditions the vehicle for such cold climates, why would anyone subject their vehicle to extended periods not getting charged and subject to phantom drain?
Although my situation is different than most, I have a take home work vehicle that must be garaged, and two hotrods that take up the rest of the garage. The Rivian and my F150 will live 100% outside in Sunny Socal weather (what's snow?). Sometimes I go a whole week without driving my personal car, because I go from work to sleep to kids homework to work to sleep... and then repeat. Inbetween that, I may drive about 10 miles total to and from the gym in a week. Biggest stretch was 14 days straight of 15 hour days at work without even looking at my truck. I've had instances where my regular ICE vehicles are dead, because of phantom battery drain or just not being driven long enough to keep the battery topped off. I use battery tenders for most of the cars, but even that gets old on the daily driver. Because of where I have to park, about 15 feet from the garage, I probably won't leave the EV plugged in all the time. So like I said, my situation is different.
 
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