Concerned with reliability of this new startup?

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HikerTom

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Tom
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Tom
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Personally, the last 4 cars I've purchased were all sight unseen and un-driven.
What were the 4 cars and how did it turn out?
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Sdvictor

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Victor
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What were the 4 cars and how did it turn out?
Subaru Outback Turbo - $36k
VW GTI - $35k
Mercedes E class wagon - $89k
Mercedes GLS450 - $95k

All turned out totally fine. You just need to research the heck out of everything. It doesn't hurt that I'm purchasing cars new with warranty, so that makes it easy. I'm personally not too concerned about whether or not i like it especially with the plethora of information available online these days. Worst case is you drive it for a few months, find out you don't like it, and then turn around and sell it for more than you paid for it.
 
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Temerarius

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2017 Tesla Model X, 2018 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel
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Personally, I'm not too worried.

I've owned a Tesla now for awhile, and, outside of one issue, most of the "reliability" issues that Consumer Reports calls out, were software issues that were generally quickly addressed via either a system reboot, or a cache purge (thanks MCU 1 and poor eMCC design!).

The one major issue I had was a compressor failure in my X, that resulted in it needing a tow. The upside was the car alerted Tesla if the issue before I noticed it. They called me and they sent the flatbed before I even knew I had an issue.

Out side of that, there was an issue I had with engaging my autopilot. And again, the car was reporting the issue to Tesla, they troubleshoot it, and had the parts on hand when the car went in for Service.

In both cases, I was in and out in a day (again, because it's a connected car, Tesla could see the issue, often before I did).

Otherwise, it's generally weird behavior of the center stack media control unit.

...and that was fixed via a recall and then an upgrade to MCU v2.

Am I worried about the drive train, battery, etc? No.

Suspension? A bit, it's complex, but again, nothing super new (and in use in other vehicles, so it's not a brand new system).

Media control/performance? Oh yeah, it will have issues, patches. And probably, at some point, a hardware upgrade.

However, compared to my experiences with ICE and legacy automakers... where it can be a game of Russian roulette... I feel way more confident on this purchase.

The power, networking, and body control unit architecture is all (most likely) set up to have less crap that can go wrong, and when it does, troubleshooting is way easier (a failure is one of a handful of control units, instead of one of hundreds that are sold daisy chained together).
 
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