autonomy

djshock

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Anyone know any specifics on Rivians plans for autonomy. I'm looking to get into the EV world with my next car purchase. I believe that it may be my last purchase with the way I feel autonomous cars are developing. I wonder how sensible it is to buy an EV that is not capable of full autonomy.
 

EyeOnRivian

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Anyone know any specifics on Rivians plans for autonomy. I'm looking to get into the EV world with my next car purchase. I believe that it may be my last purchase with the way I feel autonomous cars are developing. I wonder how sensible it is to buy an EV that is not capable of full autonomy.
"According to Rivian, its vehicles will eventually offer Level 3 autonomous driving systems with over-the-air software update capability, much like that of Tesla. Vehicles will be equipped with Level 2 technology at launch, which uses a series of cameras and radar hardware. Over time, Rivian will use driver data to work toward higher levels of autonomy."

Source: https://insideevs.com/news/353101/rivian-r1t-electric-truck-amazon-event/

I've heard / read similar statements from Rivian reps including RJ.
 

Hmp10

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This sounds as if Rivian is not going to repeat the Tesla mistake of over-selling the capabilities of its autonomous driving systems.

However, despite Musk's habit of over-hyping everything, Tesla will probably arrive sooner at higher levels of truly functioning autonomy simply because, by starting earlier, they have been able to accumulate more driver data to feed their AI computing programs than anyone else involved in autonomous driving development.

I'm hoping that at some point automakers and autonomous driving developers such as Waymo will begin pooling their data to hasten the advent of full autonomous driving for all. At this stage, though, having more data than the next guy is seen as a competitive advantage rather than a way to enhance safety for all on the road.
 

Alan Burns

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Montana in the winter on mountain passes where all the road lines are buried under packed snow, patches of black ice mean if you are in cruise control when you cross into one you will end up in the ditch. Rule 1 in Montana winter driving is Turn Off the Cruise Control.Then there is US 12 over Lolo Pass where semis with 53' trailers can't physically keep any of the trailer wheels on the right side of the road on curves.

Lots of narrow 2 lane roads with no shoulders and center lines and edge lines which do not get refreshed until late August. Speed limits are 70 except the 35, 45 and 55mph recommended speeds.

Autonomous vehicles are going to work sooooo well.

Alan
Missoula
 

Hmp10

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The first rule of driving safely with autonomous control is knowing when to turn it off, just as the first rule of manual driving in bad weather is to adjust speed and technique to conditions. A few Tesla drivers have already learned this the hard way.

We are in the very early days of autonomous driving and, as the recent Consumer Reports testing of Tesla's newest autopilot showed, some manufacturers claim -- and some drivers believe -- that they function better than they actually do at this point.

There are still some very basic questions on the table, with some manufacturers betting on a wider and more complex array of sensor hardware (such as adding lidar) and others betting on more sophisticated AI computing with less-complicated sensors (Tesla's approach).

New technologies often bring this kind of debate. I'm old enough to remember the early days of antilock braking and the hot debates over whether it augmented or reduced safe vehicle handling in emergency situations. (There was an ancillary debate about whether antilock brakes could even be manufactured reliably enough for consumer use. Mercedes was the early driver behind antilock braking, and its system had almost 2,000 components. Manufacturing defect rates at the time were such that some people claimed it was statistically almost impossible to build a system that would work as designed, as every system would necessarily contain some defective components.)

There were certain situations, at least in the early days of the technology, when antilock braking actually did increase risk. Eventually, of course, antilock braking prevailed, as data began to accumulate that more accidents were avoided or reduced in severity than were caused or exacerbated by the technology. On the other hand, brake-by-wire went in the other direction. I had a 2004 Mercedes SL55 that was the first production car in which Mercedes installed another new technology it was pushing: brake-by-wire systems. The system had recurrent problems (I had two brake failures myself), and within two years Mercedes quietly pulled the system from the market.

Autonomous driving technology will never be totally risk free, no matter what its proponents will claim. It will or won't make it in the marketplace depending on conclusions not about whether it prevents all accidents, but whether it prevents more accidents than it causes.
 
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