Anyone buying the $500 Rivian Wall Charger?

HTownB

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FWIW, I only used the mobile charger for my Tesla for the 4 years I owned it. I plugged it into a NEMA 14-50 outlet in the garage and never once unplugged it to take it with me. Based on that experience, I'm not buying the Rivian wall charger.

The use case for the Rivian is a little different (and the charging network is not as vast yet), so maybe I find myself wanting the wall charger down the line so I can just keep the mobile charger in the truck.
Same here. I’d be more interested in just an extra standard charger cord for the right price.
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nfrank

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I want to buy two of the wall chargers for $500. Compared to others on the market everything else rated at 48amps with a 25ft cord is at least $700.
 

JeremyMKE

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Did we ever confirm who makes the Rivian Home Charger? Rumor had it at Wallbox but I dont think that has been confirmed.
 

ironpig

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I have a Tesla charger now and I think I'm going to add a 3rd party charger of the Rivian and anything else we might drive in the future.

Blink is announcing a new charger this week (HQ series) that has Vehicle 2 Grid and wifi etc. I'm sure there may be others coming out of CES.

I'll see what's the best, fastest and most full featured home charger closer to when my Truck is ready and install it before it arrives.
 

sheydon

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I watched that Chargepoint review video someone posted earlier (thank you).

I have a new question. I see they mention using the "Chargepoint App" to control the device - how is the 'charging' actually controlled - via the Rivian vehicle App or via the charger app? If i install a non-Rivian charger will I have to make sure the two apps are somehow coordinated? I always was under the impression the actual charging controller was on the vehicle... but then why would Chargepoint offer an app to help me manage charging.

Also, is there any benefit (other than pricing and rebates) to having a 3rd party charger over the Rivian Charger?

Sorry, I'm confused - but I'm sure someone here can help straighten me out.

Thanks!
 

SANZC02

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I watched that Chargepoint review video someone posted earlier (thank you).

I have a new question. I see they mention using the "Chargepoint App" to control the device - how is the 'charging' actually controlled - via the Rivian vehicle App or via the charger app? If i install a non-Rivian charger will I have to make sure the two apps are somehow coordinated? I always was under the impression the actual charging controller was on the vehicle... but then why would Chargepoint offer an app to help me manage charging.

Also, is there any benefit (other than pricing and rebates) to having a 3rd party charger over the Rivian Charger?

Sorry, I'm confused - but I'm sure someone here can help straighten me out.

Thanks!
It is probably a combination of both.

My example, I use an off brand charger for my Model S. I have the charger setup so unless I override the setting it only charges in off peak windows. That way I can plug the car in anytime without concern of peak windows. I then use the settings in the Tesla to set max charge level.

I would expect the Rivian to behave similarly.
 

sheydon

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It is probably a combination of both.

My example, I use an off brand charger for my Model S. I have the charger setup so unless I override the setting it only charges in off peak windows. That way I can plug the car in anytime without concern of peak windows. I then use the settings in the Tesla to set max charge level.

I would expect the Rivian to behave similarly.
Thanks @SANZC02

But, if I ONLY had Rivian (vehicle and wall charger) - would it be "both" or would there just be one app to interface with?

Scott
 

ironpig

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Thanks @SANZC02

But, if I ONLY had Rivian (vehicle and wall charger) - would it be "both" or would there just be one app to interface with?

Scott
Likely just one app - the Rivian app. I think they way to look at it is that the Car app - whether it be Rivian, Tesla or any other EV - is where you are going to be setting all your charging limits and monitoring how much charge your car is getting.

If you have a 3rd party charger - you might ALSO have another app that allows some other settings like limiting charging to certain hours, interfacing with your energy provider, etc.

But for the most part you are always going to be using the vehicle's app as the primary interface.

(this could all be wrong if the Rivian charger has it's own app, but I assume it's like Tesla and it's just integrated in the Rivian app)
 

godfodder0901

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Likely just one app - the Rivian app. I think they way to look at it is that the Car app - whether it be Rivian, Tesla or any other EV - is where you are going to be setting all your charging limits and monitoring how much charge your car is getting.

If you have a 3rd party charger - you might ALSO have another app that allows some other settings like limiting charging to certain hours, interfacing with your energy provider, etc.

But for the most part you are always going to be using the vehicle's app as the primary interface.

(this could all be wrong if the Rivian charger has it's own app, but I assume it's like Tesla and it's just integrated in the Rivian app)
It's all in one. Look in the app under "add a Rivian product":
Screenshot_20220103-200027_Rivian.jpg
 

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I have 2 wall connectors (chargers) on order but will most likely not get them as I need / want 48amp load sharing units. This pretty much puts me in the Wallbox or Juicebox realm. Hopefully Rivian can / will add this ability to theirs.
 

AndroidAppBundle

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No. Consensus in Tesla-world is that brand specific EV chargers are novelty eyecandy bling.

A NEMA 14-50 plug will charge a Tesla at 30mi/hr. A at-home level 2 charger (beit brand specific charger like a Tesla wall charger, or a Chargepoint charger) will charge at 44mi/hr. Note - these are figures Tesla publishes. No clue on Rivian, (information is scarce, and they don't publish a lot of details).

If a home has 2 EV, then a level 2 charger makes more sense. If there is just one EV, and overnight charging is possible, there will be very few scenarios where L2 charging at home is needed.

Beyond that, it does not make sense to buy a L2 charger that only works with certain vehicles. People don't want to have to buy two chargers because of compatible reasons.

Lastly, most people want WiFi enabled level 2 chargers, and some also want L2 chargers with API's they can access. Chargepoint, juicebox etc have these features.

But most people who don't want to spend money unnecessarily, will just get a NEMA 14-50 outlet installed and buy a adapter (who own Tesla's). I assume the same will hold true for Rivian.

Is anyone buying the $500 wall charger? Does that charge faster than the standard charging wire that comes with the car?
 

CommodoreAmiga

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A NEMA 14-50 plug will charge a Tesla at 30mi/hr. A at-home level 2 charger (beit brand specific charger like a Tesla wall charger, or a Chargepoint charger) will charge at 44mi/hr. Note - these are figures Tesla publishes. No clue on Rivian, (information is scarce, and they don't publish a lot of details).
Rivian does publish this info.
[email protected] would give you 16 miles range per hour charging. (This is the max you’d get with the included portable charger)

[email protected] would give you 20 miles range per hour charging.

[email protected] would give you 24 miles range per hour charging. (This is the maximum “Level 2” rate for Rivian)


If a home has 2 EV, then a level 2 charger makes more sense. If there is just one EV, and overnight charging is possible, there will be very few scenarios where L2 charging at home is needed.
Level 1 charging would get you only 3 miles of range per hour charging. That won’t meet most peoples needs, imo.

Beyond that, it does not make sense to buy a L2 charger that only works with certain vehicles. People don't want to have to buy two chargers because of compatible reasons.
im not aware of any exclusive/proprietary EVSEs. Almost all of them are J1772 so they plug-and-charge anything but a Tesla. They can be used to charge a Tesla with an inexpensive adapter. The Tesla EVSEs plug-and-charge Teslas (obviously) but will also work with any other EV with an adapter.

you only get into “exclusive” territory when you start talking about some DC fast chargers or the new “inductive” charging loops that are being teased.
 

AndroidAppBundle

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Good find. I still can’t find where Rivian publishes this. I know Tesla publishes theirs in a few spots (e.g. Tesla Store https://shop.tesla.com/product/gen-2-nema-adapters )

Can you share the URL so that everyone can reference it?

Also, would a NEMA 14-50 outlet with adapter (charging at a rate of 30mi/hr with a Tesla) be considered Level 1 or Level 2? Is Level 1 charging limited to charging from a NEMA 5-15? Trying to understand the distinction between them.

It seems that NEMA 14-50 with adapter, charging at 30mi/hr, is level 2 (ish?).

If the circuit is rated for 50 amp, aren’t you only supposed to pull 40 amp, for safety reasons? That is my understanding. If yes, wouldn’t [email protected] require a 60 amp breaker?

Has anyone been able to test out the charging and see if Rivian exceeds (or fails to meet) the stats you had shared?

Rivian does publish this info.
[email protected] would give you 16 miles range per hour charging. (This is the max you’d get with the included portable charger)

[email protected] would give you 20 miles range per hour charging.

[email protected] would give you 24 miles range per hour charging. (This is the maximum “Level 2” rate for Rivian)




Level 1 charging would get you only 3 miles of range per hour charging. That won’t meet most peoples needs, imo.


im not aware of any exclusive/proprietary EVSEs. Almost all of them are J1772 so they plug-and-charge anything but a Tesla. They can be used to charge a Tesla with an inexpensive adapter. The Tesla EVSEs plug-and-charge Teslas (obviously) but will also work with any other EV with an adapter.

you only get into “exclusive” territory when you start talking about some DC fast chargers or the new “inductive” charging loops that are being teased.
 

AndroidAppBundle

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I would be interested to see Juicebox/Chargepoint at-home L2 chargers vs. NEMA 14-50 charging speeds with Rivian. Does anyone have those details?
 

CommodoreAmiga

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Good find. I still can’t find where Rivian publishes this. I know Tesla publishes theirs in a few spots (e.g. Tesla Store https://shop.tesla.com/product/gen-2-nema-adapters )

Can you share the URL so that everyone can reference it?
https://rivian.com/experience/charging
There's a section on both the wall charger and portable charger. Under the wall charger they say "up to 25 miles per hour" which I assume is them "rounding". I will explain more, below. For the portable charger they specifically say 16 miles for 240V and 3 miles for 120V.

https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/noframes/44462.shtml

The EPA also lists certified efficiency for the R1T at 48 kWh / 100 miles. That's 480 Wh per mile, which is measured "at the wall" and includes inefficiencies in the charging circuit. The Rivian Wall Charger is 11.5 kW capable, per their website -- but we can also independently confirm since 240V * 48A = 11,520W = 11.52 kW. To turn that into "miles of range per hour of charging" we simply divide the rate by the amount of energy to go one mile, so 11,520 / 480 = 24 miles per hour.

Also, would a NEMA 14-50 outlet with adapter (charging at a rate of 30mi/hr with a Tesla) be considered Level 1 or Level 2? Is Level 1 charging limited to charging from a NEMA 5-15? Trying to understand the distinction between them.
NEMA 14-50 would be "Level 2".

Level 1 = 120V AC
Level 2 = 208-240V AC

There is no official "Level 3" but people colloquially refer to DC Fast Charging (DCFC) as "Level 3".

It seems that NEMA 14-50 with adapter, charging at 30mi/hr, is level 2 (ish?).
It is Level 2.

If the circuit is rated for 50 amp, aren’t you only supposed to pull 40 amp, for safety reasons? That is my understanding. If yes, wouldn’t [email protected] require a 60 amp breaker?
Yes, and yes. National Electric Code (NEC) specifies that circuits be de-rated to 80% when running constant loads, like EVSEs. So a 50A circuit would be limited to charging at 40A. To run a 48A EVSE you'd need a 60A circuit. NEMA 14-50 is limited to 50A, so any "plug in" EVSE will be limited to 40A. A 48A EVSE is going to require a "hard wired" installation.

Has anyone been able to test out the charging and see if Rivian exceeds (or fails to meet) the stats you had shared?
The EPA has certified the 48 kW / 100 miles result. All the math checks out. No surprises.
 
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