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Am I turning into a Wuss? Uncomfortable with transporting gasoline in R1T bed

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JohnB R1T

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Would an Automower work?

It wouldn't replace your riding lawn mower, but could supplement it.
No, this is buffel grass and coastal bermuda (think hay field). If I let it get long enough, I could bale it. I need something "tougher"
 
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duessell

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I had to buy gas for my snowblower a couple weeks ago. It felt slightly less conspicuous than when I did the same thing last year in my Model 3.
 

tren01t

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May I suggest rewatch of the 1980's classic, "The Road Warrior". Sounds like you're ready to wage a war for a tank of juice lol.
 

mikehmb

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No, youre not a wuss.

As a lifelong petrolhead and lover of all things combustion, I will say that gasoline is disgusting and I despise handling it. But it smells better burned with 2-stroke oil.

Speaking of combustion - Reno Air Races are in September, and its the last year ever, so get your tix now. I dont want to be the only Rivian in the parking lot.
 

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Riviot

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That much land and no ruminants on it? In Texas?
 

Foobar

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I've started using these No-Spill gas cans and MUCH prefer them over the old regular plastic ones. They're true to word and don't leak, splash or have any issues. So much so that I carry them inside my SUV after filling up, something I would've never considered doing with regular cans. Is it smart to carry inside a vehicle? Probably not.
I'll give another vote for these cans - they're what I use as well. Can get em from Amazon if you're so inclined.
 
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JohnB R1T

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I'll give another vote for these cans - they're what I use as well. Can get em from Amazon if you're so inclined.
I'm leaning towards these...I have a Tractor Supply 17 miles in one direction, 20 miles in another direction & 15 miles in a third direction.
 

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nc10

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Am I being a wuss here? Any thoughts? These are "good" gas cans (not the leaky kind).
From what I've read, gas can fires are a risk, but happen mostly when transferring in or out of the can. After spending decades working in chemical plants where you'd never, ever transfer a flammable liquid without being sure everthing was grounded on both ends, the way we pump gas into cars or fill cans seems wrong. For better or worse, later this year gas cans will include additional safety features to further reduce the risks. I saw a couple articles that stated the highest risk was when cans were nearly empty, which is consistent with a few drum related incidents I'm familiar with (flashing occurring in near empty drums).

Thinking out loud...

- Reading in between the lines, I'm pretty sure you are filling the cans safely, ie, while they are on the ground and not while sitting in the truck.
- My guess also is If the R1T gets hit you've got plenty of mass around the can, so its less likely the cans will be damaged and ignite than if they were in your car trunk or back of an SUV. (Just my guestimate). I think you are saying the same, feels safer to have the cans strapped in the bed rather than a trailer or hitch carrier.
- Drums and tote bins of flammable liquids are shipped by trucks routinely. We should probably worry more about those....

-For the the vapor above gasoline to ignite, the flammable content in the vapor space needs to be in a range of about 1.2%-7.1% gasoline by volume %, referred to as the lower and upper explosion limit (UEL, LEL).

- Too low, there's not enough fuel in the vapor to ignite. Too high concentration, there's not enough oxygen left (displaced by gasoline vapor). If your container is closed, the vapor and liquid are likely to be in equilibrium and consistent across the vapor space. Its its less likely to ignite on a hot summer day, because the vapor concentrentation above gasoline is (much) more than enough to displace enough oxygen to reduce ignition risks due to static electricity. Risk is higher at much lower temps. If the container is open to the air, its harder to predict, less likely to be at steady state or equilibrium across the vapor space, more possible there will be some spot near the can opening where the concentration is in a range that can ignite.
 
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JohnB R1T

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That much land and no ruminants on it? In Texas?
No, we keep the cows on bigger acreage...they get in the way of the operation of the oil wells on the smaller parcels of land. :CWL:
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