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48 PSI tire pressure now recommended with new update?

crashmtb

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Nitrogen is a better (although more expensive) alternative. "Dry" compressed air is not a given, and it certainly isn't what you'll get from the onboard compressor in the R1T.

Firestone: "Nitrogen molecules are larger and slower moving than those of compressed air. Because of this, nitrogen won't seep out of your tires as quickly as air will, helping to maintain proper pressure for a longer period of time."
It’s impossible to get a pure nitrogen atmosphere inside of a passenger vehicle tire that only has one valve.
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zymolysis

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It’s impossible to get a pure nitrogen atmosphere inside of a passenger vehicle tire that only has one valve.
One can probably get fairly close; and since the oxygen leaks out at a faster rate, than does the nitrogen, the nitrogen percentage will probably go up over time, as one adjusts pressure (assuming that only nitrogen is used).
 

usofrob

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One can probably get fairly close; and since the oxygen leaks out at a faster rate, than does the nitrogen, the nitrogen percentage will probably go up over time, as one adjusts pressure (assuming that only nitrogen is used).
That's an interesting idea. But, I wonder how long that would take. My tires don't tend to lose much air when between swapping them for the seasons when I use my standard type air compressor (the kind with a small air tank). I feel like they lose about 0-?2 psi maybe over about 6 months. That's about 2.5% of the air pressure for my 40 psi tires (not Rivian). How much faster does the oxygen leak out than the nitrogen? And is it really the oxygen that you're trying to get out? I thought it was the humidity that was the problem. How fast does that leak out?
 

zymolysis

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How much faster does the oxygen leak out than the nitrogen? And is it really the oxygen that you're trying to get out? I thought it was the humidity that was the problem. How fast does that leak out
Here's the quote from Firestone:
"Nitrogen molecules are larger and slower moving than those of compressed air. Because of this, nitrogen won't seep out of your tires as quickly as air will, helping to maintain proper pressure for a longer period of time."
My anecdotal experience indicates that since I have been using nitrogen (at Costco), in previous vehicle, I haven't needed to add pressure as much. FWIW, I would guess that Costco is using some kind of nitrogen concentrator, the same concept as an oxygen concentrator (which people with breathing/lung problems use), since I haven't seen nitrogen tanks at Costco, so it probably isn't very pure nitrogen (instead, just a much higher percentage of nitrogen). Just speculation on my part.
 

zymolysis

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My tires don't tend to lose much air
Mine do. I have had my R1T for 6 months. I topped up the tires up after I had owned it for several months, and now they have all dropped about 6 PSI. It may be slightly cooler now than it was in late May or June, but that won't account for that much change (these are all hot months in Phoenix).
 

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usofrob

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Mine do. I have had my R1T for 6 months. I topped up the tires up after I had owned it for several months, and now they have all dropped about 6 PSI. It may be slightly cooler now than it was in late May or June, but that won't account for that much change (these are all hot months in Phoenix).
I definitely see my tire pressures go up and down with temperature. But, when I check at about the same temperature after many months, I don't tend to see much loss unless I have a hole in my tires. However, throughout the year with the tires that are on the car (I swap with summer/winter), I do have to adjust the tire pressures based on temperature rise/fall for the seasons in Michigan. So, I'm testing the tires that were sitting in my basement compared to the last time I had them on.

On a side note, when I've taken one of my vehicles to autocross (a parking lot racing event), after each heat I might have to let out some air to keep the tire pressures exactly where I want them to be as the air inside the tires heat up. Then at the end of the day when I go home, I have to add a lot of air back at ambient temperature.
 

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I see many off-road here in the Mojave desert or Mexico TCarry this type of quick fill system

it’s your choice , please use what you want as I will.

There deflators work well also .

IMG_2097.png
That’s for CO2 not nitrogen.
 

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Make sure you check with a digital gauge every vehicle I have owned the sensors were off by 1-3 psi. My current R1T is off by -1 psi so 47 is 48 psi. The digital display from the rear compressor is off by 2 so 46 is 48 psi. I use two different digital gauges to confirm. My Model YP and Model S were off by 3 psi.
My manual gauge shows and the on board air compressor when attached show 48 and my display shows 46. It's weird. Wasn't an issue with my OEM 21's...
 

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You can fill any size for 35.00 cylinder at a local compressed gas distributor.

I have two 220 cu ft tanks for my application.

I know longer use a coil hose thou
 

zymolysis

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That’s for CO2 not nitrogen.
From the Powertank website:
"Both regulators are dual gas, meaning they work with both CO2 and nitrogen (N2). You would use your Power Tank regulator with N2 if you need to service shocks, hydraulic bump stops, or air struts."
 

av8or

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From the Powertank website:
"Both regulators are dual gas, meaning they work with both CO2 and nitrogen (N2). You would use your Power Tank regulator with N2 if you need to service shocks, hydraulic bump stops, or air struts."
Thanks, I didn’t know that. I’ve used co2 for years for airing up, and back in the day to run air tools on the trail. I had no idea the same tank and regulator could be used for nitrogen.

Edit: I guess it’s not the same tank.
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