Fenwayfan77

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I started with the WA State .gov page and I'm pretty sure that's a dead end. So in an effort to find this public information one would need to scour random City or County websites for what appear to be local government meeting minutes such as these for the plans?

Thoughts?!?! 🤔
Have fun with that!!! Lol. Well, I’m personally not doing that digging! Ha. However, Google is pretty smart. You’d prob have a better shot by narrowing your search to all things “Rivian LLC” or similar and narrowing your time period to the last week or 24 hours for the most focused results. It may not pull back everything but you will catch a lot.





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Bumble1978

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Have fun with that!!! Lol. Well, I’m personally not doing that digging! Ha. However, Google is pretty smart. You’d prob have a better shot by narrowing your search to all things “Rivian LLC” or similar and narrowing your time period to the last week or 24 hours for the most focused results. It may not pull back everything but you will catch a lot.
Right...my first thought was what's so special about Salida, CO? What would be equivalent cities elsewhere?!!? Let the Googling begin! :cool:
 

azbill

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Right...my first thought was what's so special about Salida, CO? What would be equivalent cities elsewhere?!!? Let the Googling begin! :cool:
What is special about Salida is that it is the city leasing them the land, and that lease had to be voted on and made public. That is why someone found this. When Rivian does a lease with a private entity, nothing has to be made public.

I also found on Plugshare that Salida currently has 2 Chargepoint 62.5KW DFDCs.
 

Bumble1978

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What is special about Salida is that it is the city leasing them the land, and that lease had to be voted on and made public. That is why someone found this. When Rivian does a lease with a private entity, nothing has to be made public.

I also found on Plugshare that Salida currently has 2 Chargepoint 62.5KW DFDCs.
Rad, solid sleuthing!

The only other fitting attribute about Salida in general and where it's physically located is that in the past few years it has popped up on some various online publication lists for 'Top Small U.S. Towns to visit near Outdoor Adventure Locations'. Hmmm.....situated near a North/South and East/West highway interchange, near National Forest land.

A pattern may be developing...as soon as we hear of another one.
 

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When Rivian does a lease with a private entity, nothing has to be made public.
Electrical permits are another way to sleuth out installations
 

Rivianmd

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Figured I’d put this here. What is the benefit of buying a level 2 charger like a juicebox vs using the OEM 240v plug and installing a nema 14-50 plug with same amperage? Am I missing something.
 

DucRider

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Figured I’d put this here. What is the benefit of buying a level 2 charger like a juicebox vs using the OEM 240v plug and installing a nema 14-50 plug with same amperage? Am I missing something.
Most likely the OEM cordset (portable EVSE) will be 32A (from the numbers Rivian has put out there). A hardwired EVSE can supply the Rivian with 48A, and one connected to a circuit with a 14-50 could be either 40A or 32A (depending on the the wire gauge and breaker size).
Many people also want to carry the OEM cord with them, and outlets/plugs are not designed for that kind of duty cycle (one of the J1772 plug design parameters was to address that issue).
 

Rivianmd

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Thanks for the response. I assume they will offer for purchase portable EVSEs. I think for my needs 32a will be enough
 

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Thanks for the response. I assume they will offer for purchase portable EVSEs. I think for my needs 32a will be enough
Right now it appears it will be included. If you are looking for a 2nd one, pricing may be higher that installing an EVSE at home.
 

ajdelange

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Any news of ClipperCreek being bought by Rivian or at least a partnership
If Company A is in a market where relativity condensers are commonplace it often goes to an established manufacturer of relativity condensers and contracts with it to build a version of a relativity condenser with Company A's logo on it rather than undertake the design and development of its own relativity condenser. This is clearly what has happened here. It is improbable, but not, of course, impossible, that there is any relationship between Rivian and Clipper Creek beyond a contract for X units.
 

ajdelange

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Figured I’d put this here. What is the benefit of buying a level 2 charger like a juicebox vs using the OEM 240v plug and installing a nema 14-50 plug with same amperage? Am I missing something.
Just one advantage really. Obviously if you charge at home, as most of us will, you won't unplug the OEM charger and put it back in the truck every morning. This gives you the opportunity to go off on a road trip and leave it dangling in your garage. Many of us, especially those who tend to be forgetful, prefer the security of knowing that the OEM charger is a permanent part of the vehicles kit.

My neighbor leaves his Tesla UMC dangling over the edge of his fence so he can conveniently plug in his S when he gets home. Should I ever want another mobile charger and had my parents not raised me as well as they did I would know where to get one at a five finger discount.

Beyond that a hard wired, permanent installation is always neater than a cable trailing across the garage floor.
 

Bumble1978

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If Company A is in a market where relativity condensers are commonplace it often goes to an established manufacturer of relativity condensers and contracts with it to build a version of a relativity condenser with Company A's logo on it rather than undertake the design and development of its own relativity condenser. This is clearly what has happened here. It is improbable, but not, of course, impossible, that there is any relationship between Rivian and Clipper Creek beyond a contract for X units.
This assumes that Company B's Widgets, Engineering, Testing, Production, QC, and Logistics are reliable, which in this case is definitely true. I hear Clipper Creek EVSE's are solid.

Sounds similar to what EnelX did with Juicebox after a minor facelift.

Logical observations all around, good sir. :cool:
 

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https://apple.news/AU6nHW-lpSIydYQqeRIK1BA

This is the problem with Electrify American and networks other than Tesla. Hoping Rivian can mirror Tesla.
That is the inherent problem with manufacturers touting charging in "up to" xx miles in xx minutes. So many variables in play on both driving and charging efficiency.
I have not heard that the Mach-e does any battery prewarming in anticipation of fast charging (Tesla does if it knows that is where you are headed), but Rivian has more than hinted about their "smart" battery pack adjusting to differing conditions. During cold December conditions in NJ, I would fully expect to get much less the the optimal "up to" number touted by Ford. But I've been around EVs for a long time and the general public would likely have no clue of what factors impact the range per mile metric that manufacturers use to avoid talking about scary terms like kWh.
 

ajdelange

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There certainly have been a host of reliability problems with EA stations in the past and there will continue to be until, eventually, the majority are ironed out. Tesla has a tremendous advantage over EA in that they only have one OEM's vehicles to interface with and that is their own. But they still have to be able to interface across all their models. The nature of the interface (Telsa or EA) is set by standards. These abound in modern life. If you buy a 1" IPT die from any manufacturer and thread a piece of pipe with it that piece of pipe will thread into any IPT fitting from any other or the same manufacturer. The would be manufacturer buys a copy of the standard which has frawings showing taper, thread pitch, thread depth etc. and builds his dies so that pipe cut with them match the drawing. It is the same with the chargers except that the interfaces are not only specify mechanical and electrical properties such as which communication protocol is to be used at what baud rate and what events must take place in which order during a charging session. If a vehicle doesn't charge properly someone didn't implement the standard correctly or the standard has a fundamental flaw. Both happen and it sometimes takes a while to get a robust standard and to get the kinks ironed out of everyone's implementation.

All that notwithstanding I wouldn't take this writer too seriously. He does not appear to understand the distinction between kW and kWh and is probably unaware of charge taper. If you pull into a Tesla V3 SC (250 kW) at 85% SoC to marvel at 250 kW charging you will be very disappointed as your car will only accept a fraction of that in order to protect the battery,
 

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